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PRESENTED I3Y 



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1 



The Leading 

Daily \ 
Newspaper 

qf the 

Motiorti 

Picture 

Industry 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Alert, 
Intelligent 

Faith fut 
Service to 
the Industry 
in All 
Branches 



OL. 36. NO. 1 



NEW YORK, MONDAY, JULY 2, 1934 



TEN CENTS 



^,oew Waivers Columbia Set 



3rderedEnded 
3n Protection 



Ircuit Ends Practice 
After Code Case 



Voluntary waivers of protection, 
eretofore generously granted by 
.oew's to independents, are being dis- 
ontinued by the circuit. The order 
as gone out to all bookers. 

Up to now Loew, in many instances, 
as been lending a helping hand to 
naffiliated exhibitors in tight spots 
n bookings and frequently has waived 
s protection on films to enable a 
nmpetitive house to spot book. In 
ome cases, the circuit has given up 
ix of seven days' clearance in order 
:> give a "small fellow" a break on 

needed picture. 

Playing the role, however, has had 
s boomerang. Recently, the circuit 
.as brought into the New York 

(Continued on page 3) 



Milwaukee Council 
Favors Film Drive 

Milwaukee, July 1. — The executive 
ommittee of the Milwaukee County 
Council of Churches has endorsed the 
lean films drive, according to Dr. E. 
_e Roy Dakin, vice-president. 

The council includes all Protestant 
hurches except Lutheran congrega- 
ions. The council expressed itself as 
in hearty accord with similar action 
aken by the Catholic brethren in pro- 
noting the Legion of Decency and 
•y the Federal Council of Churches of 
~hrist in America and the National 
ewish Welfare Assn." 



Kentucky Theatres 
Add Cent for Taxes 

Louisville, July 1. — One cent was 
idded in Louisville to each adult's 
heatre ticket beginning today to take 
are of Kentucky's three per cent 
ales tax. No tax will be added to 
ickets for children. 

Because collection of an exact three 
)er cent tax on each ticket would not 
)e possible, this plan was devised to 
•each an approximate sum. The plan 
ias been approved by members of the 
kate Tax Commission. 



All for Dime 

At the Selwyn Saturday for 
one thin dime: 

"The Cat and the Fiddle," 
"Palooka," the Baer-Carnera 
and Canzoneri-Klick fight 
films, plus a cartoon. 



For 48 with 
Westerns Cut 



Product to Be Divulged 
At Shore Meet Today 



By RED KANN 

Atlantic City, July 1. — Cutting 
down its outdoor action list from 12 
to eight, Columbia will throw its 
hat into the ring with 48 features and 
an assortment of shorts for 1934-35. 

District managers, branch managers 
and salesmen representing 16 eastern 
exchanges and Canada were assembled 
here tonight and ready for the gavel 
to sound Monday morning on the first 
of three convention days at which the 
product will be divulged and selling 
plans for the new season set up. 

Columbia will go ambitious next 
season. Elated by the box-office swath 
cut by "Lady for a Day" and "It 
Happened One Night," the compaiv 
is passing through its most successful 
vear. More deeply in the black than 

(Continued on page 6) 



Local 306 Men Ask 
Sherman to Resign 

Approximately 1,000 members of 
Local 306, of the operator's union, 
have asked Harry Sherman to resign 
as president of the organization. At a 
meeting held late last week the mem- 
bers took a vote on the question after 
Sherman had walked out of the session 
when those attending got out of hand. 
A report on Sherman's salary was 
also read and the request was made to 
reduce it from $18,200 a year to $200 
a week. 

The group has called a meeting for 
tonight when both these questions will 
be the main topics of discussion. 



Dowsley Talks Fight 
On Canadian Charge 

Toronto, July 1. — Word has been 
received here from C. L. Dowsley of 
Calgary, operator of seven houses in 
Alberta, that he will appeal a decision 

(Continued on page 3) 



Blame the NRA 

Portland, July 1. — A num- 
ber of suburbans have put in 
slides reading: 

"Due to the enforcement 
of NRA code, we are com- 
pelled to abolish the 15c 
price before 7 P.M., and also 
the 25c price after 7 P.M. 
We are therefore establish- 
ing a price of 20c general ad- 
mission any time for any 
seat. Kiddies a dime." 



New Officer 
To Get Code 
Enforcement 



Washington, July 1. — Preparing 
to undertake the second phase of its 
task — that of enforcing the codes it 
has developed during the past year — 
the National Recovery Administra- 
tion has created a new office to handle 
all code violations and complaints. 

An assistant administrator for field 
administration has been appointed, 
under whom will be placed the 48 
state compliance officers of the NRA, 
the compliance division in Washing- 
ton, including the compliance council, 
and a new division which will prob- 
ably be called the Code Authority 
Administration Office. 

The reorganization will centralize 
the receipt of all complaints of what- 

( Continued on page 3) 



Minnesota Decision 
Bumps Arbitration 

Minneapolis, July 1. — Arbitration 
clauses of the standard contract have 
been branded a violation of the Sher- 
man anti-trust law and "the strongest 
kind of coercion" by Supreme Court 
Justice Charles Loring. 

The decision was handed down in 
the Fox suit against A. B. Muller, 
Rex Theatre, Maple Lake, Minn., and 
the United Artists suit against W. H. 
Miller, Leb Theatre, Cloquet. Both 
operators had refused films. 



M.P. Research Council 
Seen After New "Front 



99 



Washington, July 1. — The M. P. 
Research Council is looking for a 
new "front" for its organization 
activities. The idea is to get some- 
body to take the place of Mrs. August 
Belmont, whose absence from the two- 



day session which ended here Friday 
night was conspicuous and the cause 
of much comment. 

It was generally believed here that 
the call for a session in the National 

(Continued on page 3) 



Consolidated 
New Force In 
RKO Affairs 



Notes Purchased Secured 
By Subsidiary Stock 

Consolidated Film Industries may 
exercise an influential voting stock 
power in RKO as the result of its 
acquisition of $1,825,208 of six per 
cent gold notes of RKO, which are 
secured by substantially all of the 
stock owned by RKO in its directly 
and indirectly owned subsidiaries. 

The RKO notes were acquired by 
Consolidated from Chemical Bank & 
Trust Co. and Commercial Investment 
Trust. Their original maturities were 
Jan. 1 and July 1, 1933, but under an 
agreement made between RKO and 
the banks early in 1933, extensions 
were obtained so that the first of the 
notes, in the amount of $25,208, plus 
interest, does not mature until today. 
The balance falls due Aug. 1 and the 
first of each succeeding month through 
Jan. 1, 1935, in the amount of $300,000. 
Today's maturity of $25,208 is being 
paid by RKO. Indications are, how- 
ever, that negotiations looking to 
extension of the Aug. 1 and subse- 

(Continued on page 3) 



Vancouver Excited 
Over New Film Plan 

Vancouver, July 1. — Another at- 
tack of filmitis is raging in Vancouver 
with the arrival of Gaston Glass, who 
says he represents Joseph I. Schnitzer, 
with plans to produce six to 18 pic- 
tures per year in Canada under the 
juota law. Glass says he has contracts 
from an unnamed major company for 
distribution, and all that remains is 
to work out some way to make the 
pictures. 

First worry is to obtain a building 
suitable for sound-proofing and making 
into a studio. 



Talley and Stallings 
Summon Big Meeting 

Shortly after arrival of Truman H. 
Talley, general manager, and Laurence 
Stallings, editor of Fox Movietone 
News, in Paris this week a general 

(Continued on page 3) 



No Issue Wednesday 

Motion Picture Daily will 
not publish Wednesday, July 
4, which is Independence Day 
and a legal holiday. 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Monday, July 2, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



(Registered U. S. Patent Office) 



Vol. 36 



July 2, 1934 



No. 1 



Martin Quigley 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 
MAURICE KANN 
Editor 

JAMES A. CRON 
Advertising Manager 



Published daily except Sunday and holi- 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub- 
sidiary of Quigley Publications, Inc., 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 1790 Broadway, New 
York. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Cable ad 
dress "Quigpubco, New York." All con- 
tents copyrighted 1934 by Motion Pictuie 
Daily, Inc. Address all correspondence to 
the New York Office. Other Quigley pub 
lications: MOTION PICTURE HERALD, 
BETTER THEATRES, THE MOTION 
PICTURE ALMANAC and THE CHI 
CAGOAN. . , TT . T ., 

Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Lite 
Building, Vine and Yucca Streets, Victor 
M. Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 40/ 
South Dearborn Street, Edwin J>. Clif- 
ford, manager; London Bureau: Remo 
House, 310 Regent St., London, W. 1, 
Bruce Allan, Representative. Cable address: 
"Quigpubco, London"; Berlin Bureau: 
Berlin • Tempelhof . Kaiserin - Augustastrasse 
28, Joachim K. Rutenberg, Representative; 
Paris Bureau: 19, Rue de la Cour des- 
Noues, Pierre Autre, Representative; Rome 
Bureau: Viale Gorizia, Vittorio Malpassuti, 
Representative; Sydney Bureau: 102 Sus- 
sex Street, Cliff Holt, Representative; Mex- 
ico City Bureau: Apartado 269, James 
Lockhart, Representative; Glasgow Bureau: 
86 Dundrennan Road, G. Holmes, Repre- 
sentative; Budapest Bureau: 11 Olasz 
Fasor 17, Endre Hevesi, Representative. 

Entered as second class matter January 
4 1926 at the Post Office at New York 
City, N. Y., under Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada $15 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 



French Film Men Due In 

M. Colin-Reval, editor of La Cine- 
matographic Francaise, French trade 
paper, and J. C. Bernard, producer of 
French short subjects, arrive tomor- 
row on the lie de France. Colin- 
Reval is scheduled to broadcast a 
radio message from the French film 
industry addressed to Will H. Hays 
while here. Bernard will "shoot" city 
and harbor scenes while here. 



Services for Bimberg 

Funeral services were held yester- 
day for Bernard K. Bimberg at the 
Funeral Chapel, 200 West 91st St. 
Bimberg had been a theatre builder 
for years. The Astor was one of the 
houses he erected. He was president 
of the Benkay Amusement Co., the 
Bim-Green Catering Co. and the 
Schuyler Amusement Co. 



Raoul Walsh Here 

Raoul Walsh and his wife are in 
New York from the coast. The Fox 
director is here to confer with authors 
of "Sand Hog," a yarn dealing with 
tunnel construction. 



Denver Hearing Today 

Denver, July 1. — Hearing has 
been set for Monday on the complaints 
of eight theatres against giveaways, 
acceptance of coffee carton tops as 
admissions, "country store" nights and 
"bank" nights. 



Wayburn Plans Shorts 

Ned Wayburn, dance instructor, 
has formed Ned Wayburn Pictures 
Co. to make a series of shorts. 



MOTION PICTURE DAILY* 
HOLLYWOOD PREVIEW 



"She Loves Me Not" 

{Paramount) 

Hollywood, July 1. — "She Loves Me Not" is a rapid-fire series of 
clever comedy situations made possible by the constant unravelling of 
complications through the capable delineations of a well-balanced cast 
headed by Bing Crosby, Miriam Hopkins, Kitty Carlisle, Edward Nugent,. 
Henry Stephenson, Warren Hymer, Lynne Overman, Judith Allen and 
some others. 

Despite the sustained delivery of ingeniously worked out incidents, 
abetted by smooth dialogue, the thread of the story is never lost. It 
concerns Miss Hopkins, cabaret dancer seeking refuge in a college dormi- 
tory, and her efforts to avoid becoming a material witness of a shooting 
scrape. It's here that Crosby and Nugent, students both, become fall guys 
out of sympathy to shield her. Complications arise and as fast as they 
are cleared new ones take their place. 

"She Loves Me Not," one of Paramount's next season releases by the 
way, is destined to please that type of audience searching for the whim- 
sical events of life as encountered by youth. It is flavored throughout 
with youth, romance and song. With the aid of Miss Carlisle's pleasing 
voice, Crosby sings three new numbers in his inimitable way. The 
whole offering, directed by Nugent, spells box-office above the average 
program fare of this type. 

The songs lending much to the picture were contributed by Mack 
Gordon, Harry Revel, Ralph Rainger and Leo Robin. Running time, 
85 minutes. 



English Developing 
Talent — Estabrook 

Hollywood, July 1. — The gaps in 
players' ranks at British studios 
caused by Hollywood's enticements 
are filled by building up other players 
of their own, rather than by reckless 
bidding to retain their established 
stars or to win over others from 
Hollywood, says Howard Estabrook, 
M-G-M author and scenarist, who 
returned recently from England, where 
he worked on the screen adaptation of 
"David Copperfield." 

Estabrook said he had been sur- 
prised by the number of successful and 
popular screen stars, unknown in 
America, whose pictures "gross more 
through English distribution than any 
of our stars whose pictures are dis- 
tributed throughout the world." 



Good Week Seen for Roxy 

"Baby, Take a Bow" looks like a 
$30,000 week for the Roxy, the best 
gross in some time for this house. 
Last week with "Affairs of a Gentle- 
man," the take was $13,700. "Oper- 
ator 13" at the Capitol garnered a mild 
$34,000. 



Lincoln to Vote on 
Sunday Film Shows 

Lincoln, Neb., July 1. — An election 
on Sunday shows appears assured at 
the Aug. 14 balloting here. Bob 
Livingston, manager of the Capitol, is 
chairman of a petition campaign, and 
reports about twice as many signers 
as needed. The City Council has ex- 
pressed willingness to let the matter 
go on the ballot without argument 
when the petitions are filed. Sunday 
shows were beaten in a referendum 
here six years ago. 



Buy Into Showcraft 

John T. Bergen & Co.. investment 
bankers, Harry Dahn and Jack Ber- 
gen have purchased a half interest in 
Showcraft Pictures, Inc. The other 
half is owned by Adolph Pollak, presi- 
dent, and Emil K. Ellis. 

Pollak left for Hollywood yesterday 
to line up the first two of 18 features 
planned under the franchise idea. He 
will remain on the coast for four 
weeks. During the second and four 
following years Showcraft intends to 
turn out 24 annually. 



Trading Light on Big Board 



High Low 

Eastman Kodak 97V 2 9"V 2 

Loew's, Inc 28'A 2VA 

Paramount, cts 354 354 

Pathe Exchange 254 2 

Pathe Exchange "A" 20 1954 

RKO i 2% 254 

Warner Bros S'A 554 



Close 

97!^ 

2sy 2 
VA 

2 
20 
2Vi 
S'A 



Net 
Change 

- Va, 
+ H 



+ V2 



Technicolor Lone Curb Issue 



Technicolor 



High 

. 13 



Low 

13 



Net 
Close Change 

13 



Sales 

100 
1.100 
1.500 
3,100 
400 
500 
400 



Sales 

100 



< Purely 
Personal ► 



JULIUS S. FISHER, publicity 
»J director for Amalgamated Thea- 
tres, Ltd., Singapore, sailed Saturday 
on the Britannic after a three weeks' 
vacation here. 

Charles Gibson Whitehead, asso- 
ciate producer of Colored Photo- 
play Co., Inc., is the proud father of a 
nine pound daughter. He plans to 
name the heiress Dolores. 

Len Daly of the U. A. foreign pub- 
licity department, ended the uncer- 
tainty Friday evening when his final 
sales argument went across and Ruth 
Stripling became his wife. 

Mort Blumenstock, in charge of 
theatre advertising for Warners, is 
of? again on a business trip. Stops 
will be Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Phila- 
delphia and Atlantic City. 

Edmund Burke left for Hollywood 
yesterday after completing the script 
of Shirley Temple's next for Fox, 
"Angel Face." 

Bill Orr of M-G-M observed a 
25th wedding anniversary over the 
week-end at his country home, Leo- 
minster, Mass. 

Ruby Keeler, now vacationing with 
Al Jolson in Scarsdale. returns to the 
coast July 23. 

Genevieve Touin arrived from 
Europe on the Beren<jaria. 

Charles O'Reilly finally goes to 
Omaha this week. 

Irving Mandell of Chicago will be 
here for a few days. 



Take Two Lincoln Spots 

Lincoln, Neb., July 1. — The West- 
land Theatres Corp. of Denver has 
taken over the Rialto and State, acting 
through an affiliate incorporated as 
Cornhusker Theatres. 

The two have been operated for the 
past two years by a local independent, 
with occasional closing periods. The 
State, renamed the Kiva, will use first 
runs, while the Rialto continues 
seconds. 



New Newburgh Company 

Albany, July 1. — Newburgh Acad- 
emy of Music Operating Corp., New- 
burgh, has been chartered with capital 
of $5,000. Henry Wilson, Palatine 
Hotel. Newburgh ; Alice Nelson, Salis- 
bury Mills, and Alexis Beckerich. 
W hite Plains, are the incorporators. 



Paramount Publix Bonds Off 2 x / 2 



General Theatre Equipment 6s 
Loew's 6s '41, ww deb rights... 

Paramount Publix 5%s '50 

Pathe 7s '37 ww 

Warner Bros. 6s '39, wd 



'40. 









Net 




High 


Low 


Close 


Change 


Sales 


&A 


&Vz 




+ 54 


5 


\ooy 2 


99% 


100 


—1 


15 


5254 


50H 


50 


-214 


18 


99 


99 


99 




4 


SS'A 


55 


'55 


- Va 


16 



Six Spots Change Hands 

Omaha, July 1. — Six theatres in 
Iowa and Nebraska within the Omaha 
distribution area changed hands last 
week. 

Eric Wesselman took over the Strand at 
Pierce. Neb.; H. C. Ebmeier, Orleans, Or- 
leans. Neb.; E. E. Seff, Granada, Sioux 
City. Ia.; C. 0. Moore. Idle Hour. Dun- 
lap. Ia.; M. A. Clark. Sterling. Blue Hill, 
Neb., and Central States Theatres Corp., 
Rialto. Missouri Valley, Ia. 

Two houses closed : Bailey- at Mis- 
souri Valley, Ia., and the Table Rock 
at Table Rock, Neb. 



Zanuck Nearly Killed 

London, July 1. — Daryll Zanuck 
was nearly trampled to death by ele- 
plants in Africa, according to cable 
reports received here today. The 
beasts resented being photographed, it 
is reported, and charged the cameras. 



Monday, July 2, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Campi Sets Up 
^Special Plan 
On U.A. Cases 

Special procedure for hearing and 
^disposing of U. A. 10 per cent cancel- 
lation complaints has been set up by 
Campi, and it goes into effect at once 
This question has had Campi in a 
stew of uncertainty for several weeks. 

Complaints are to be filed on spe- 
cial forms with local grievance boards, 
which, instead of certifying complaints 
to Campi, must make a decision as 
to whether or not the respondent 
charged with violating the code is 
guilty. This means that grievance 
boards must first hear cases and 
determine whether or not exhibitors 
complaining have bought all of the 
U.A. product offered. 

If the protestant has not bought the 
entire group of pictures then he can- 
not cancel on individual contracts and 
the case will be dismissed without 
further ado. However, if it is found 
the exhibitor purchased all the prod- 
uct offered, and has not made any 
eliminations before buying, then his 
case is referred to the compliance 
board, officially known as Local Indus- 
trial Adjustment Agency, which will 
attempt to settle. Failing to arrive at 
a settlement, the compliance board 
then will submit the issue to Campi. 

In the case of the Egyptian, DeKalb, 
111., Code Authority did not have a 
decision from the Chicago grievance 
board and so did not know whether 
the exhibitor had bought all of the 21 
pictures offered. This case is slated 
to be heard by the compliance board 
in the Windy City this week, and if 
it is found the theatre operator did not 
make eliminations before buying, the 
issue then will be referred to Campi 
for rehearing. 

However, if Campi affirms decisions 
of compliance boards and U. A. then 
refuses to grant cancellations, the 
matter then will be referred to the 
proper governmental officer to invoke 
remedies and penalties under the 
XIRA Act. It is understood U. A. 
will accept decisions of Campi on the 
matter. 

The Cincinnati grievance board last 
week passed on to Campi another U.A. 
cancellation argument. Frank W. 
Huss, Jr., of the Park, Cincinnati, and 
the Highland, Newport, Ky., is the 
complainant. This case is expected 
to be returned to the local compliance 
board, like the Chicago complaint, for 
a decision and not a certification. 



Loew Waivers 
OrderedEnded 
On Protection 



{Continued from page 1) 

grievance board by an independent 
operator and the local body asked to 
lift Loew's seven-day clearance over 
the independent's house. One of the 
points brought out in the case was 
that Loew for weeks had been releas- 
ing pictures it had played to the sub- 
sequent house one day after showing. 

This irked Loew's to the point where 
it became convinced a good turn is not 
always appreciated. The independent 
lost his case and also the appeal. In 
the future, the major circuit will stick 
by its guns and take full protection 
and clearance as provided, come what 
may in the way of requests for relief. 



New Officer 
To Get Code 
Enforcement 



Wisconsin Men Hit 
Company Trailers 

Minneapolis, July 1. — Resolutions 
opposing the sale of trailers by 
Al-G-M have been adopted by Inde- 
pendent Theatre Owners Ass'n. at 
Lake Geneva. The resolution says 
that the members will not buy M-G-M 
product if forced to buy trailers. It 
also includes the same statement about 
Warner-First National product. 

Plans for group unemployment 
insurance which would reduce pre- 
mium rates for independent exhibitors 
were outlined at the closing session of 
the Wisconsin Allied meeting at Lake 
Geneva yesterday by Arthur Wess of 
this city. 

Chicago's clearance and zoning setup 
was described by Aaron Saperstein, 
head of Illinois Allied. Carol Hib- 
bard of Madison explained the Wis- 
consin state unemployment insurance 
act. An election of officers of the 
Wisconsin unit will not be held until 
probably late this month. 



(Continued from page 1) 

ever nature which come into NRA 
and will place the responsibility for 
follow-up upon one official. Com- 
plaints received by the administration 
fall almost entirely into two categories, 
it was said. One group consists of 
complaints alleging code violation ; 
the other, charges of code maladminis- 
tration. 

The first class has heretofore been 
handled jointly by the compliance di- 
vision and the code authorities, while 
the second class has been handled by 
the division and deputy administrators, 
who usually referred them to the ad- 
ministration members of the code au- 
thorities for comment and action. 



Consolidated 
New Force In 
RKO Affairs 



Dayton, Tippacanoe 
Rezoning Completed 

Cincinnati, July 1. — The local 
clearance and zoning board yesterday 
zoned the Dayton territory, and Tip- 
pecanoe City, against both of which 
protests have been filed. 

Greater Cincinnati and Columbus 
territories were zoned last week as a 
result of protests. 

Balance of the territory within the 
jurisdiction of the local board will be 
zoned in accordance with present 
schedules. 



Dismiss Phila. Cases 

Philadelphia, July 1. — Two cases 
have been dismissed by the clearance 
and zoning board. In both cases, the 
Boulevard of Brookline vs. the Ard- 
more, and the Cameo vs. the Harrow- 
gate, the plaintiffs did not present 
sufficient evidence that clearance was 
unfair. 



Dowsley Talks Fight 
On Canadian Charge 

(.Continued from page 1) 

against him in the suit of the Canadian 
Performing Rights Society over the 
music copyright tax. 

Dowsley says that if the Court of 
Appeals confirms the judgment he will 
organize independents to demand an 
investigation of the score charge situa- 
tion in Canada by a Parliamentary 
committee at Ottawa. 

He insists that he is willing to pay 
the performing rights society or a 
score charge, but not both, and will 
move for Federal action to gain re- 
lief. This action is in line with Os- 
car Hanson's agitation in behalf of 
Allied exhibitors for abolition of 
score charges in Canada next month. 



M.P. Research Council 
Seen After New "Front" 



(Continued f 

Education Ass'n building just prior to 
the annual meeting of the N. E. A., 
was to lay out a program that would 
bring it out of the shadows developed 
by the church crusade for clean films. 
The decision of the council to call a 
national meeting in Chicago and invite 
all religious and educational groups 
strengthened this impression. 

The resignation of Mrs. Belmont, 
who had called the meeting here, and 
her failure to attend caused consid- 
erable comment among the group and 
unguarded expressions indicated that 
the plea of overwork was merely an 
alibi to cover up friction within the 
organization, said to lie largely be- 
tween the president and Rev. William 
H. Short, over the strategy to be fol- 
lowed, particularly with reference to 
publicity. Members of the council, 
however, were reluctant to discuss the 
matter. 

That the council meeting was held 
at this time in an attempt to develop 
a program for submission to the 
educators was indicated with pub- 
lication of the N. E. A. agenda. On 
Monday, Robert P. Wray of the Penn- 
sylvania State College will discuss the 



rom page 1) 

"Relation of Motion Pictures to 
Standards and Morals," and the follow- 
ing day an entire session of one group 
will be devoted to the film situation, 
with Dr. Cline M. Koon of the Fed- 
eral office of education speaking on 
the "Relation of Films and Radio to 
Classroom Instruction" ; Rita Hoch- 
heimer, assistant director of visual in- 
struction, New York public schools, on 
"School Films, Their Source and Val- 
uation" ; Hilda Marie Diller, research 
department, Washington public schools, 
on "Motion Pictures vs. Classroom In- 
struction" ; Howard M. Lesourd, Bos- 
ton University Graduate School, on 
"Films in Preparation for Use in 
Character Education" ; and C. F. Ho- 
ban, Pennsylvania State Department 
of Public Education, on "Report of the 
International Conference on Motion 
Pictures." 

On July 5, the report of the M. P. 
Research Council will be laid before 
an N. E. A. group by Dr. W. W. 
Charter, director of the Bureau of 
Educational Research of Ohio State 
University, in an address on "The 
Effect of Motion Pictures on Chil- 
dren." 



(Continued from page 1) 

quent maturities will be begun soon. 

Voting of the RKO stocks pledged 
as collateral securing the notes may 
be exercised by Consolidated in cer- 
tain contingencies. Voting of the 
stock for the election of RKO direc- 
tors, however, may be exercised only 
as directed by RCA. On all other- 
matters the stock may be voted as 
directed by a committee of three, two 
to be named by H. J. Yates, president 
of Consolidated, and the third by 
David Sarnoff, RCA head. In the 
absence of directions from this com- 
mittee the stock may be voted in the 
"uncontrolled discretion" of Consoli- 
dated. 

Dividends or any other proceeds 
paid on the RKO subsidiaries' stock 
and notes, which are pledged as col- 
lateral on the gold notes held by Con- 
solidated, are to be employed for the 
operation of a revolving credit fund 
out of which new loans are to be 
made to the operating subsidiaries of 
RKO for working capital and current 
requirements. These new loans, ac- 
cording to the agreement, are to be 
secured in the case of Radio Pictures 
by chattel mortgages on completed 
films, a new film to be pledged as an 
old one becomes obsolete. Consoli- 
dated has the right to deduct interest 
on the notes from this revolving fund, 
however. 

The pledging of the negatives was 
attacked by RKO creditors over a 
period of months but the plan eventu- 
ally received the approval of the U. S. 
Circuit Court of Appeals here, and 
the creditor objections came to an end. 
During the court attacks on the plan, 
attorneys for the RKO receivers 
stated that if the agreement was set 
aside the collateral securing the notes, 
which represents "substantially all of 
the assets of RKO," could be sold by 
the note-holders and might result in 
putting RKO out of existence as a 
going concern. 



Talley and Stallings 
Summon Big Meeting 

(Continued from page 1) 

meeting of European forces will be 
held to discuss plans for the new 
newsreel in the fall. 

Arrangements are virtually per- 
fected for coverage in Soviet Russia. 
Present at this meeting will be : 
Gerald Sanger, editor of British 
Movietone News, heading a delegation 
from England, Ireland, Scotland and 
Wales ; Russell Muth, heading a con- 
tingent from Germany, Lithuania, 
Poland, Latvia, Esthonia, Denmark, 
Norway, Holland and Finland ; Ettore 
Villani, heading a group from Italy, 
Greece, Turkey, Palestine, Egypt, 
Syria, Tripoli and Mesopotamia; 
Hans Pebal, from Hungary, Czecho- 
slovakia, Jugoslavia, Rumania, Bul- 
garia and Albania ; Ben Miggins, 
European director, and his forces from 
Belgium, Switzerland, France, Portu- 
gal, Tunis, Algeria and Morocco. 

A meeting also will be held within 
the next few weeks of editorial and 
camera crews covering Asia, Africa 
and South America. Talley plans to 
increase the number of offices in 
Central and South America. 



UMB/AS FIRST 




"Miss Moore's perform- 
ance utterly charming and 
the whole picture a delight- 
ful entertainment," 

Mary Pkkford 





JuAt a /w of uieAcweA of 
have liwwoA poutdnq in/ 



"This is one for you! It is 
an evening for the Gods!" 

— Kathryn Dougherty 
Photoplay Magazine 

"Grace Moore sings exqui- 
sitely and brings something 
new into pictures." 

Silver Screen 





"Dear Grace . . . You com- 
pletely won your audience 
with your warmth and charm 
and thrilled us with your glo- 
rious voice." 

Norma Shearer 




RNERBAXT 




WATCH FOR CAPRA'S "BROADWAY BILL' -wit 



*OR Z934-/935 CLICKS 




atch the next announcement/ 




RNA LOY and others - C O L U M B I A MARCHE 



Sloty DOROTHY SPEARE 
anJt CHARLES BEAHAN 

S. K. LAUREN 



A COLUMBIA PICTURE 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Monday, July 2, 1934 



Columbia Set 
For 48 with 
Westerns Cut 



(Continued from page 1) 
ever before, plans have been fashioned 
to splurge on what will be the organ- 
ization's largest production budget, 
substantially increased over the cur- 
rent negative cost allotment. A number 
of pictures to be built around star- 
director combinations will set their 
cap for preferred playing time during 
the big half, which is the last half, of 
the week next season. 

The Columbians, about 125 strong, 
will be given the lineup as far as it 
will go, on Monday. The schedule 
will outline 32 pictures of the 48 
specifically by title, directors and casts. 
Eight others, not identified by title, 
are being withheld to permit the com- 
pany to select stories and players in 
conformity with changing times and 
trends. The final eight will make up 
the outdoor contingent and will star 
Tim McCoy, who will again make the 
same number as he is contributing to 
the 1933-34 schedule. Buck Jones, 
currently making four, will not 
appear on the '34-35 lineup. Short 
subjects, the men will be told, will 
break down into 26 two-reelers and 
eight series of one-reelers. 

Capra Will Do Two 

Indicating Columbia's swing toward 
the personality equation is the inten- 
tion to make two Frank Capra pro- 
ductions, one Grace Moore, whose 
"One Night of Love" is the lead-off 
picture for the new season ; one 
Claudette Colbert, one Edward G. 
Robinson, four Jack Holts, one Holt 
with Edmund Lowe co-starring, one 
Boris Karloff and one starring Gene 
Raymond and Ann Sothern. 

Presaging the plan to capture more 
preferred playing time is the comment 
of a ranking executive who declared : 

"Because of the ever-mounting in- 
crease in cost of production, due not 
only to public demand for finely pro- 
duced stories of popular plays, books 
and short stories, but also due to the 
operation of NRA principles through- 
out the organization, Columbia must 
be in a position to acquire more of 
exhibitors' preferred playing time." 

The new lineup, it is promised, will 
be backed by more extensive news- 
paper, magazine and radio advertising 
and exploitation campaigns than ever 
before attempted. The budget is said 
to permit augmented national adver- 
tising in newspapers, national and fan 



Ritzing It with Columbia 



Atlantic City, July 1. — The Co- 
lumbia conventioneers are in almost 
complete possession of the Ritz-Carl- 
ton beach front. Although there were 
some arrivals on Saturday night, most 
of the boys got in today. The home 
office contingent arrived at noon. In 
the party were Jack Cohn, Nate 
Spingold, Abe Montague, Rube 
Jackter, Joe McConville, Lou As- 
ter, Lou Weinberg, Hal Hode, J. W. 
MacFarland, Al Seligman and 
Milt Hannock. Sam Liggett beat 
the rest of the home office crowd to 
the beach by flying down. 



With serious business the order of 
the day commencing Monday morn- 
ing, the Columbians applied them- 
selves seriously to the task of acquir- 
ing suntans on the beach. Some few 
are having themselves pushed along 
the boardwalk in wheel chairs. 



The main topic of conversation to- 
day was Columbia's special preview 
of its lead-off picture of the new sea- 
son, "One Night of Love." This is 
to be given following the regular show 
Monday night at Warner theatre on 
the boardwalk. The advance informa- 
tion from the coast has the boys all 
excited. 

• 

The home office sales staff, headed 
by Montague, were grouped on the 
beach most of the afternoon, their 
heads close together in a discussion of 
the final details of the convention. 
With the exception of the one pre- 
view there will be no night sessions, 
in accordance with Columbia's long 
established policy of mixing work 
with relaxation. 

• 

Not even the delights of the new 
summer home he has just acquired 

(Continued on page 7) 



magazines and over the leading broad- 
casting chains, as well as extensive 
merchandising and exploitation cam- 
paigns of a national scope. 

The meeting at the Ritz will be the 
first of two. The second will be held 
in Chicago beginning July 9. The 
first order of business at this and the 
midwestern convention will concern 
itself with liquidation of current prod- 
uct and an explanation of why 
Columbia feels it has reached the 
point where it is ready to step out. 

This will be followed by several 
sessions at which 1934-35 product will 
be outlined by Jack Cohn and dis- 
cussed. Publicity, advertising, ex- 
ploitation and sales promotion plans 
will then be presented to the delegates 



and the convention will wind up with 
special conferences held by the indi- 
vidual branches to discuss local prob- 
lems affecting each territory. 

Cohn will officially open the meet- 
ing, which will include, in addition to 
his address, speeches by Abe Mon- 
tague, general sales manager ; Abe 
Schneider, treasurer, and William 
Jaffe of the legal department. In 
addition, the home office contingent 
present at the convention consists of : 
Nate Spingold, George Brown, direc- 
tor of advertising, publicity and ex- 
ploitation ; Rube Jackter, Joseph A. 
McConville, Hal Hode, Lou Wein- 
berg, Henri Brunet. J. Barbano, Louis 
Astor, Hank Kaufman, Al Seligman, 
Sam Liggett, Milton Hanock, Lou 



At Columbia Convention Helm 






JACK COHN 
Vice-President 



ABE MONTAGUE 
Gen'l Sales M'e'r 



JOE McCONVIEEE 
Nat'l Sales M'g'r 



Star Splurge 
In Line for 
New Season 



Goldberg, Ben Atwell, J. W. Mac- 
Farland, Arnold Van Leer, Sam 
Hacker, Charles Roberts, Mort 
Wormser, Bill Brennan, John Kane. 
Milt Goodman and Maurice Grad, 
several of whom will address the 
gathering. Walter Futter, producer 
of Columbia shorts, will also attend. 

Present from the field are the fol- 
lowing division managers, branch man- 
agers and salesmen : 

Albany — C. N. Johnston, manager; J. 
Bulhvinkel, S. E. Feld, J. Rieff. 

Atlanta — S. M. Moscow, southern divi- 
sion manager: W. W. Anderson, manager; 

B. A. Wallace, V. T. Koch, S. T. Wilson. 

F. J. Shepard. T. Toddy, exploiteer. 
Boston — T. F. O'Toole, manager: S. 

Simons. P. D. Fox, T. F. Jennings, R. J. 
Murray. E. J. Anderson, J. L. Cronan. 
Fred Marshall, exploiteer. 

Buffalo — Joe Miller, manager; M. Bris- 
kin. T. Donahue, G. H. Ferguson. 

Charlotte — R. J. Ingram, manager; G. 
Roscoe. C. Alexander. 

Cincinnati — A. S. Moritz. manager; C. 
R. Palmer, L. E. • Davis. M. Spanagel, E. 

C. Stewart. 

Cleveland — H. C. Bissell, manager; G. J. 
Becker. S. E. Gerson, L. Zucker. 

Dallas — J. B. Underwood, manager; W. 
S. Hurst, W. L. Penn, J. L. McKinney, 

G. Hartley. L. L. Savage. 

Memphis — J. J. Rogers, manager; F. 
Curd. T. B. Haynes. 

New Haven — I. H. Rogovin. manager; 

B. J. Lourie. 

New Orleans — H. Duvall. manager; J. 
Winberry, J. J. Fabacher. 

New York — N. J. Cohn. district manager; 
S. Trauner. M. Fraum, J. Sokoloff, S. 
Schussell, Eddie Schnitzer. Irving Worm- 
ser, J. Becker, J. Wenisch, C. Penser. 

Oklahoma City — F. L. Stocker, manager; 

C. A. Gibbs. S. E. Gibbs. 

Philadelphia — H. E. Weiner, manager, 
and Mrs. Weiner; W. Bethell, M. Gillis, 

D. Korson, S. Perlsweig. Mr. Wurtle. 
Pittsburgh— A. H. Levy, manager; H. 

Olshan. C. B. Kosco. S. Lubell, S. Sugar- 
man. 

Washington — S. A. Galanty. manager; 
O. D. Weems. C. A. Wingfield, J. B. 
Walsh. B. Caplon. 

Canada — L. Rosenfeld: D. H. Coplan. 
P. C. Taylor, A. B. Cass. M. S. Bernstein. 
J. Leiberman. W. Elman. H. Harnick. 



Cast for Bellamy Film 

Hollywood, July 1. — J. Carrol 
Naish, Vincent Sherman, Arthur Hohl 
and Eddy Chandler have been signed 
for "Girl in Danger," last of Colum- 
bia's current policy mystery stories in 
which Ralph Bellamy plays the lead. 
Shirley Grey is the heart interest. 



Set July 7 as Date 

"Whom the Gods Destroy," featur- 
ing Walter Connolly, is on Columbia's 
release chart for July 7. 









ABE SCHNEIDER 
Company 
Treasurer 



LOU WEINBERG 
Home Office Sales 
Executive 



EOUIS ASTER 
Home Office Sales 
Executive 



RUBE JACKTER 
Assistant Sales 
Manager 



J. W. MacFAREAND 
Short Sales 
Supervisor 



GEORGE BROWN 
Director Public 
Relations 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Monday, July 2, 1934 



ChicagoTakes 
Gain as Fair 



Crowds Grow 



Chicago, July 1. — Despite hot 
weather, grosses gained sharply last 
week with the increase in fair crowds. 
The Oriental was the surprise of the 
week, going to $20,000, up by $5,000, 
on "You're Telling Me" and a vaude- 
ville bill with the fight film. 

"Many Happy Returns" took a good 
$35,000 at the Chicago, and "Strictly 
Dvnamite" was $4,000 up on a $26,- 
000 take at the Palace. 

Total first run business was $126,- 
500. Average is $127,000. 

Estimated takings : 

Week Ending June 26: 

"OPERATOR 13" (M-G-M) 

UNITED ARTISTS— (1.700). 30c -40c -60c. 
7 days. Gross: $17,000. (Average, $17,000.) 

Week Ending June 28: 

"MANY HAPPY RETURNS" (Para.) 

CHICAGO— (4.000). 35c-50c-6Sc, 7 days. 
Wampas 1934 stars. Ted Claire. Geo. & 
lack Dormonde, Duffin & Draper on stage. 
Gross: $35,000. (Average. $34,000.) 

"FOG OVER FRISCO" (F. N.) 
McVICKERS— (2.284). 30c-40c-60c, 7 days. 
Gross: $8,500. (Average. $13,000.) 

"YOU'RE TELLING ME" (Para.) 
ORIENTAL— (3.940). 25c-40c, 7 days. 
Jack Powell, Young. Worth & Wiley and 
others on stage. Gross: $20,000. (Aver- 
age. $15,000.) 

"STRICTLY DYNAMITE" (Radio) 
PALACE— (2.509). 35c-50c-75c, 7 days. 
Lupe Yelez. Ken Murray, Lew Ahearn & 
Co.. Chaney & Fox on stage. Gross: $26.- 
000.) (Average. $22,000.) 

"LITTLE MISS MARKER" (Para.) 
(Second Loop Week) 
ROOSEVELT— (1.591). 25c-35c-50c. 7 days. 
Gross: $8,000. (Average, $11,000.) 

Week Ending June 30: 

"ALL MEN ARE ENEMIES" (Fox) 

STATE- LAKE — (2,776). 20c-25c-35c. 7 
days. Joe Frisco, Jed Dooley, Harris 
Twins & Loretta. Edith Griffith and others 
on stage. Gross: $12,000. (Average, $15,- 
000.) 



"Black Cat" Leads 
Buffalo at $7,400 

Buffalo, July 1. — "The Black 
Cat" brought 'em in and they remained 
to enjoy "The Poor Rich," so the 
Lafayette had a good week at $7,400, 
or $900 above normal. Heat and rain 
killed business for everyone else. 

Total take was $31,500. Normal is 
$35,600. 

Estimates for week ending June 29: 

"THE LIFE OF VERGIE WINTERS" 
(Radio) 

BUFFALO— (3.500). 30c-55c. 7 days. 
Stage: Westchester Hillbillies; Gracie Bar- 
rie; Lowe, Burnoff & Wensley; Betty 
Kean. Gross: $12,600. (Average, $14,300.) 
"SMARTY" (Warners) 
"EVER SINCE EVE" (Fox) 
CENTURY— (3,000), 25c, 7 days. Gross: 
$5,000. (Average, $6,000.) 

"OPERATOR 13" (M-G-M) 
HIPPODROME— (2,100). 25c-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $6,100. (Average, $8,000.) 

"THE CONSTANT NYMPH" (Fox) 
"HEART SONG" (Fox) 
HOLLYWOOD— (300). 25c-40c. 7 days. 
2d week. Gross: $400. (Average. $800.) 
"THE BLACK CAT" (Univ.) 
"THE POOR RICH" (Univ.) 
LAFAYETTE— (3.300). 25c, 7 days. 
Gross: $7,400. (Average. $6,500.) 



"Tomorrow" Lang's First 

Hollywood. July 1. — "Tomorrow" 
will be the title of an original story 
which Fritz Lang will direct first for 
M-G-M. He worked on it on his way 
from Europe to this country with 
David O. Selznick and his party. 



"Operator 13" 
Boston Smash 
With $21,000 

Boston, Tuly 1. — Circus weeks 
and heat failed to damage box-offices 
hereabouts. "Operator 13," at Loew's 
State, topped par by $5,000 on a gross 
of $21,000. 

Two other unusually strong draws 
were "The Life of Vergie Winters," 
with $20,000 at Keith's and "Shoot the 
Works" with $30,000 at the Metropoli- 
tan. 

Total first run business was $105,- 
500. Average is $94,000. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing June 28 : 

"COUNTESS OF MONTE CRISTO" 
(Univ.) 
"WHIRLPOOL" (Col.) 
BOSTON— (2,900), 25c-50c, 7 days. Gross: 
$19,000. (Average, $16,000.) 

"NOW I'LL TELL" (Fox) 
"SMARTY" (Warners) 
FE!\ WAY— (1,800), 30c-50c, 7 days. 
Gross: $7,500. (Average, $9,000.) 
"LIFE OF VERGIE WINTERS" (Radio) 
KEITH'S— (3.500). 30c-50c, 7 days. Gross: 
$20,000. (Average. $16,000.) 

"OPERATOR 13" (M-G-M) 
LOEW'S STATE— (3.700). 35c-50c, 7 days. 
Gross: $21,000. (Average, $16,000.) 

"SHOOT THE WORKS" (Para.) 
METROPOLITAN— (4,350), 30c-65c, 7 
days. Revue and Capt. Proske's Bengal 
Tigers. Gross: $30,000. (Average, $28,000.) 
"NOW I'LL TELL" (Fox) 
"SMARTY" (Warners) 
PARAMOUNT— (1,800). 30c-50c. 7 days. 
Gross: $8,000. (Average, $9,000.) 



Cantor Film Retitled 

Hollywood, July 1. — The title of 
"The Treasure Hunt," Eddie Cantor 
film for Samuel Goldwyn, has been 
changed to "Kid Millions." 



(Continued from paqe 6) 

near Greenwich, Conn., could keep 
Cohn away from this meeting. He 
greeted each conventioneer by name — 
an easy task inasmuch as there hasn't 
been a single change in personnel in 
Columbia's eastern division in the last 
year. 

• 

Montague looked fit as a fiddle 
and amply prepared to weather the 
strain of the sessions to be held dur- 
ing the next three days. He confided 
that the company has closed a num- 
ber of deals for the new season, al- 
though the new lineup has not been 
officially announced. 

• 

Nate Spingold and George Brown 
are both enthusiastic over the national 
advertising program outlined for 
1934-35. The appropriation for this, 
according to Spingold, is even larger 
than that spent last year. "We not 
only make the pictures for the ex- 
hibitors, but we sell them to his cus- 
tomers before he gets them," he de- 
clared. 

• 

Hal Hode, assistant to Cohn, and 
J. W. MacFarland, short subject 
sales manager, declared they had to 
get up and out at four o'clock this 
morning in order to make the 10 
o'clock Atlantic City train. The rea- 
son is that these executives have 
their summer homes at Lake Katonah, 
situated in the wilds of Westchester 
County. 



Seattle Dull; 
"Glory" Gets 
$3,750 Gross 

Seattle, July 1. — Night baseball 
and a continuance of the waterfront 
strike continued to hit box-offices last 
week. "No Greater Glory," at the 
Liberty with $3,750, was the only first 
run to come anywhere near par. 

Total first run business was $26,250. 
Average is $31,000. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing June 30 : 

"MURDER ON THE BLACKBOARD" 
(Radio) 

"DOUBLE DOOR" (Para.) 

BLUE MOUSE — (950), 15c-25c-35c, 7 
days. Gross: $2,750. (Average, $3,500) 
"MURDER AT THE VANITIES" (Para.) 

FIFTH AVENUE— (2.450), 25c-40c-55c, 7 
days. Gross: $6,000. (Average, $7,000) 
"NO GREATER GLORY" (Col.) 
LIBERTY — (1,800), 10c-15c-25c, 7 days. 
Gross: $3,750. (Average. $4,000) 

"BORN TO BE BAD" (U. A.) 
MUSIC BOX— (950), 25c-35c-50c, 7 days. 
Gross: $3,250. (Average, $4,000) 
"LITTLE MAN, WHAT NOW?" (Univ.) 

MUSIC HALL— (2,275), 25c-40c-55c, 7 
days. Gross: $5,500. (Average, $6,500) 
"SUCH WOMEN ARE DANGEROUS" 
(Fox) 

PARAMOUNT— (3,050), 25c-35c, 7 days. 
Vaudeville headed by Don Santos & Exie. 
Gross: $5,000. (Average, $6,000) 



Bromfield Due in October 

Hollywood, July 1. — Louis Brom- 
field recently signed on an M-G-M 
term contract by David O. Selznick in 
England, will come to the coast in 
October. His first will be an original, 
"Living in a Big Way," which is 
slated for Marie Dressier. 



A discussion as to the previous oc- 
cupations of the various Columbians 
revealed some interesting "ex's." 
Cohn is an ex-advertising agency 
man. Spingold an ex-theatrical 
press representative. Hode an ex- 
sailor. MacFarland an ex-civil en- 
gineer. Rube Jackter declared he 
was no "ex" anything, having grown 
up in the film business. Incidentally, 
Jackter is sporting a strained liga- 
ment in his right side, the result of 
a too-vigorous swipe at a golf ball. 
A recent disciple of that game, Rube 
may not hit them straight, but he 
certainly hits them hard. 

• 

While on the subject of golf, Lou 
Aster is another new golf enthusiast. 
If nothing else, the game has en- 
abled him to "sluff" off a lot of 
excess poundage. 

• 

Nat Cohn, who is a frequent 
partner of Aster's on the golf course, 
is not as enthusiastic over the game 
as the above-mentioned two. Instead, 
he regards it as a laborious form of 
trench digging under another name 
to make it seem attractive. 

• 

As usual, silent Joe McConville, 
home office sales manager, is saying 
little and listening much. However, 
he generally makes up for lost time 
by the pungency of his remarks when 
his time comes to address the boys. 



7 



Denver Takes 
Hit by Open 
Air Concert 



Denver, July 1.— A three-day open 
air opera concert socked all first run 
grosses except one last week. The 
exception was the Denver, where "The 
Thin Alan" reached $7,000, up by 
$1,000. 

Other takes were low. Total first 
run business was $16,700. Average is 
$20,000. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing June 28 : 

"THE MERRY FRINKS" (F. N.) 

ALADDIN— (1.500), 25c-35c-50c, 7 days. 
Gross: $2,000. (Average, $2,500) 
"THE GREAT FLIRTATION" (Para.) 
DENHAM— (1,500), 15c-25c-40c, 4 days. 
Gross: $1,200. (Average, $4,000) 

"THE THIN MAN" (M-G-M) 
DENVER — (2,500), 25c-35c-50c, 7 days. 
Gross: $7,000. (Average, $6,000) 

"THE CRIME DOCTOR" (Radio) 
ORPHEUM— (2,600), 25c-35c-50c, 7 days. 
Gross: $4,500. (Average, $6,000) 

"NOW I'LL TELL" (Fox) 
PARAMOUNT— (2,000), 25c-40c, 3 days. 
Gross: $900. 

"WHIRLPOOL" (Col.) 
"SISTERS UNDER THE SKIN" (Col.) 

PARAMOUNT— (2,000), 25c-40c, 4 days. 
Gross: $1,100. (Average for week, $2,000) 



"Winters," Fight 
Best Omaha Draw 

Omaha, July 1.— "The Life of 
Vergie Winters" and the Baer- 
Carnera fight took the big money here 
last week in spite of the Catholic ban 
on the former. The take of $4,800 at 
the Brandeis was over normal by 
$1,000. 

"Little Man, What Now?" was dis- 
appointing at the Paramount, pulling 
only $6,500. 

Provisional closing notices have 
been posted at the World and Para- 
mount and Bert Smith's Varieties 
probably will end a four-week run on 
Thursday at the World. Beer 
taverns and night club competition 
have been too much. 

Total first run business was $23,- 
750. Average is $23,550. 

Estimated takings : 

Week Ending June 27: 

"LITTLE MAN, WHAT NOW?" (Unn .) 

PARAMOUNT— (2,900), 25c-35c-40c. 7 
days. Gross: $6,500. (Average, $7,250) 

Week Ending June 28: 

"THE LIFE OF VERGIE WINTERS" 

(Radio) 

"CARNERA VS. BAER" 2nd week 

BRANDEIS— (1,500), 20c-25c-35c. 7 days. 
Gross: $4,800. (Average, $3,800) 
"MANY HAPPY RETURNS" (Para.) 
"A MODERN HERO" (Warners) 

ORPHEUM— (3,000), 25c-35c-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $7,200. (Average. $7,000) 

"BORN TO BE BAD" (U. A.) 

WORLD— (2,200). 25c-35c, 7 days. Stage: 
Smith Varieties. Gross: $5,250. (Average, 
$5,500) 



Canton House Reduces 

Canton, O., July 1. — Although 
Loew's, Warners' Alhambra and Con- 
stant's Palace, the three local major 
houses, agreed on a uniform admis- 
sion scale several months ago, the Pal- 
ace has cut night prices to 15 and 25 
cents for balcony and lower floor, with 
matinee rate 15 cents. All prices are 
plus 10 per cent state tax. No change 
has as yet been announced by the 
other two. 



Ritzing It with Columbia 



Noted for 

UNIFORMITY 



REVOLUTIONARY new qualities 
made Eastman Super-Sensitive "Pan" 
a byword almost overnight. But only day-in 
and day-out delivery of those qualities over 
a long period could give this film lasting 
fame in the motion-picture world. Uniform- 
ity ...the quality that has always character- 
ized Eastman films . . . has made Eastman 
Super-Sensitive Panchromatic Negative the 
brilliant leader it is today. Eastman Kodak 
Company. (J. E. Brulatour, Inc., Distribu- 
tors, New York, Chicago, Hollywood.) 



EASTMAN Super-Sensitive 
Panchromatic Negative 



The Leading 


Daily r 




Newspaper 


of the 


fjgr 


Motioljj 




Picture 




Industry 





MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Alert, 




Intelligent 


and 




Faith f ur 




Service 




the Industry 


in All 




Branches 



VOL. 36. NO. 2 



NEW YORK, TUESDAY, JULY 3, 1934 



TEN CENTS 



ColumbiaSets 
26 Titles of 
48 for 34-35 



Name Seven Star Films; 
Nine Shorts Series 

By RED KANN 

Atlantic City, July 2. — Columbia 
announced 26 titles on its 1934-35 list 
of 48 at today's session of the sales 
convention, and indicated the details 
of seven others in a general way. One 
short story, five novels and seven 
stage plays are represented in the list. 

Those on which star names but no 
titles were given are two to be di- 
rected by Frank Capra, one Edward 
{Continued on page 10) 



Columbians Cheer 
Jack Cohn Speech 

Atlantic City, July 2. — Columbia 
delegates this afternoon cheered the 
assertion by Jack Cohn that the in- 
dustry is "more sinned against than 
sinning." He said in part : 

"This violent burst of condemna- 
tion is directed against something 
greater and something far more im- 
portant and all-embracing than the 
motion picture. 

"The storm has mistakenly been 

{Continued on page 10) 



Say Warners After 
Eight Jersey Spots 

Warners are understood negotiating 
for eight New Jersey houses ; the 
Ritz, Lyndhurst ; Rahway, Rahway ; 
Playhouse, Dover ; Rex, Irvington ; 
Lincoln, Arlington ; Bellevue, Upper 
Montclair ; Broadmore, Bloomfield ; 
Park, Caldwell. The first five are 
operated by Haring & Blumenthal and 
the last three by Rapf & Rudin. 

Efforts to confirm the deals with 
Warners yesterday were unavailing. 



Ann Ronnell to Sing 

Ann Ronnell, sister of Di- 
vision Administrator Sol A. 
Rosenblatt, goes into vaude- 
ville this week at the RKO 
Orpheum, Omaha. The com- 
poser will sing and play some 
of the popular tunes she has 
written. 

From Omaha she will go to 
Hollywood where she will 
start work on a Paramount 
contract. 



Paramount to Continue Ban on 
Sales to All 10-Cent Houses 

Continuing its current policy, Paramount will not sell 10-cent 
houses next season, it is stated. The subject, in addition to duals 
and preferred playing time, is highlighting regional sales meet- 
ings now being held. 

The" number of percentage pictures for 1934-35 has not yet been 
set, but it is understood each situation will be handled individu- 
ally, since no blanket policy has been determined. 



"Star" Urges Further Delay 
% of Pictures 
Be Kept Clean 



Kansas City, July 2. — Offering a 
plan for self-regulation, the Kansas 
City Star suggests that three-fourths 
of the industry's total output be kept 
clean for general consumption, the 
remaining one-fourth to be intended 
for "mature minds" and so labeled 
when shown. The Star editorially 
urges the plan as a solution to the 
widespread agitation for screen reform 
and as a means of forestalling legis- 
lative action. The paper's policy is to 

(Continued on page 12) 



No Waite Successor 
Soon, Says Schaefer 

No immediate naming of a succes- 
sor to Stanley Waite, Paramount 
divisional sales manager who died re- 
cently, is contemplated by George 
Schaefer, Paramount general manager, 
who returned to his office yesterday 
following the company's annual sales 
meeting on the coast. In the mean- 
time, Joseph Unger, central Atlantic 
division manager, who has taken over 

(Continued on page 6) 



Para.-Capitol Pool 
Deal Awaits Action 

Pooling of the Capitol and Para- 
mount remained in status quo yester- 
day as representatives of both Loew's 
and Paramount prepared for further 
conferences on the proposal in the 
near future. 

The outcome of the Loew-Warner 
negotiations for the Fox Metropolitan 
(Continued on page 6) 



Estimates Ohio Tax 
To Cost $3,000,000 

Cleveland, July 2. — P. J. Wood, 
business manager of the I. T. O., esti- 
mates that the 10 per cent admission 
tax will net the State approximately 
$3,000,000 this year. Wood computes 

(Continued on page 6) 



Looked for On 
Fox Met. Sale 



With Loew's and Warners still some 
distance from a final agreement with 
'the Fox Metropolitan bondholders' 
committee on a purchase of the 87 
houses of the circuit last night, in- 
dications are that no deal may be 
struck this week. 

The bidders, Loew's and Warners, 
and the bondholders' committee were 
prepared to go into court this morn- 
ing and ask a further adjournment 
of the hearing scheduled for today 
before Federal Judge Julian W. 
Mack. Indications are that with 
the bondholders joining in the peti- 
tion for another adjournment, the 
court will consent to a further delay. 

(Continued on page 6) 



Appeal Groups Sit 
3 Days First Week 

Code appeals committees will sit 
only three days this week instead of 
four as originally planned. Although 
tomorrow is Independence Day, Campi 
decided to postpone today's session so 
that local code board members who 
anticipate going away can do so. 

At yesterday's session, the first of 
its kind, five appeals were heard and 

(Continued on page 6) 



Coast Indies After 
An Eastern Contact 

Los Angeles, July 2. — Expressing 
confidence in Campi, Harry H. Hicks, 
president-elect of the I.T.O.A. of 
Southern California, today urged ap- 
proximately 200 exhibitors to set up 
a special fund to establish representa- 
tion in New York for independents on 
the coast. 

The man to be retained will not be 
an attorney, but one thoroughly; famil- 
iar in code matters to represent the 
local group particularly in clearance 
and zoning problems. Hicks discussed 

(Continued on page 6) 



Review Board 
Seeks Early 
End of Campi 



For Dismissal, Adoption 
Of Recommendations 



Washington, July 2. — "Abrupt dis- 
missal" of the film Code Authority 
and adoption of the recommendations 
made in its original report on the in- 
dustry are urged by the National Re- 
covery Review Board in its third and 
final report to the President. 

The religious campaign against in- 
decent pictures is laid squarely at the 
door of big producers and the code, 
but the punishment falls upon the small 
exhibitor who had nothing to do with 
the production of the pictures com- 
plained against or voice as to whether 
he would show them, the report held. 

With the submission of its third re- 
port, the Darrow board went into 
eclipse, with Chairman Clarence Dar- 
row resigning and going to Europe 
and the three remaining members of 
the board, W. W. Neal, Fred P. Mann 
and Samuel P. Henry, returning to 
their homes. It was explained, how- 
ever, that the board has not abolished 

(Continued on page 12) 



Report Pecora in 
Fight on Kennedy 

Washington, July 2. — Opposition 
to the election of Joseph P. Kennedy, 
former head of Pathe, to the chair- 
manship of the Securities and Ex- 
change Commission, was reported 
brewing here today under the leader- 
ship of Ferdinand Pecora. 

Kennedy was President Roosevelt's 
choice for a full five-year term on the 

(Continued on page 6) 



Exchange Heads May 
Get Film Board Jobs 

Exchange managers in every key 
city may take over the work of Film 
Boards of Trade in the event those 
organizations are abandoned next 
season, it was learned yesterday. 

Under this proposal, which has been 
advanced in several distribution quar- 
(Continued on page 6) 



No Issue Tomorrow 

Motion Picture Daily will 
not publish tomorrow, July 
4, which is Independence Day 
and a legal holiday. 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Tuesday, July 3, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 

(Registered U. S. Patent Office) 



Vol. 36 



July 3, 1934 



No. 2 




Martin Quigley 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 
MAURICE KANN 

Editor 
JAMES A. CRON 
Advertising Manager 



Published daily except Sunday and holi- 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub- 
sidiary of Quigley Publications, Inc., 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 1790 Broadway, New 
York. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Cable ad- 
dress "Quigpubco, New York." AH con- 
tents copyrighted 1934 by Motion Pictuie 
Daily, Inc. Address all correspondence to 
the New York Office. Other Quigley pub- 
lications: MOTION PICTURE HERALD, 
BETTER THEATRES, THE MOTION 
PICTURE ALMANAC and THE CHI- 
CAGOAN. 

Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Life 
Building, Vine and Yucca Streets, Victor 
M. Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 407 
South Dearborn Street, Edwin S. Clif- 
ford, manager; London Bureau: Remo 
House, 310 Regent St., London, W. 1, 
Bruce Allan, Representative. Cable address: 
"Quigpubco, London"; Berlin Bureau: 
Berlin - Tempelhof , Kaiserin - Augustastrasse 
28, Joachim K. Rutenberg, Representative; 
Paris Bureau: 19, Rue de la Cour des- 
Noues, Pierre Autre, Representative; Rome 
Bureau: Viale Gorizia, Vittorio Malpassuti, 
Representative; Sydney Bureau: 102 Sus- 
sex Street, Cliff Holt, Representative; Mex- 
ico City Bureau: Apartado 269, James 
Lockhart, Representative; Glasgow Bureau: 
86 Dundrennan Road, G. Holmes, Repre- 
sentative; Budapest Bureau: 11 Olasz 
Fasor 17, Endre Hevesi, Representative. 

Entered as second class matter January 
4, 1926 at the Post Office at New York 
City, N. Y., under Act of March 3, 1379. 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada $15 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 



RKO Center Closing 

The RKO Center closes July 8 to 
prepare for its fall opening as a stage 
musical house under the direction of 
Max Gordon, producer, M. H. Ayles- 
worth, RKO president, stated yester- 
day. Reopening is set for Sept. 17. 

No change in policy at the Music 
Hall is contemplated, Aylesworth said. 



Gaumont British Moves 

Gaumont British of America opened 
new offices in larger quarters at 1600 
Broadway yesterday. 

W. A. Ryan, formerly Albany 
branch manager for Fox, has been 
named special representative for Gau- 
mont British in the up-state territory. 



Marie Dressier Resting 

Santa Barbara, July 2. — Continu- 
ing to show improvement, Marie 
Dressier is now able to take a liberal 
amount of liquid nourishment. She is 
resting comfortably and occasionally 
talks to attending physicians. 



Declares P'f'd Dividend 

Loew's board of directors has de- 
clared a quarterly dividend of $1.62j^ 
per share on the outstanding $6.50 
cumulative preferred stock, payable 
Aug. 15 to stockholders of record July 
28. 



Distribution Deal Closed 

Raspin Prod, has just closed with 
the Capitol Film Exchange to dis- 
tribute "Are We Civilized?" through- 
out the Metropolitan area. 



Insiders' Outlook 



Atlantic City, July 2. 

A PEPPY and enthusiastic 
bunch, this Columbia crowd, 
last to go into a sales convention 
but aspiring no end to something 
akin to close-to-the-top honors for 
the new season. This column told 
you weeks ago Harry Cohn was 
heading toward a flock of "A" 
pictures for '34-35. The Colum- 
bia lineup, which appears else- 
where in this edition today, dem- 
onstrates the veracity of the tip. 
The fuss which the company is 
turning loose on its intention of 
seeking more preferred playing 
time links up with production 
plans, made and announced and to 
be made and announced later. 
Columbia is swinging sharply 
toward names and starring pic- 
tures as part of its more ambi- 
tious program. . . . 

▼ 

Elsewhere. Herb Yates is presi- 
dent of Consolidated Film In- 
dustries. Consolidated is in a lot 
of businesses, but they're all off- 
shoots of its principal enterprise, 
lab printing. Remembering this 
makes it easier to understand the 
why of that deal which gives 
Consolidated possession of RKO's 
six per cent secured notes. The 
paper carries it with voting privi- 
leges which very easily could 
mean that Radio's prints will be 
turned out in Consolidated labs 
and not Pathe. Instances are not 
wanting where Yates has financed 
important companies merely to 
keep his machines occupied. . . . 
T 

The spokesman who appears 
thereafter is partisan in his point 
of view. His interests rest with 
the bondholders. Barring that, if 
you like, here is his reason why 
a stock assessment — $2 a share on 
the common — is a necessary con- 
tingency which Paramount share- 
holders will have to meet : "There 



is considerable cash on hand, it is 
true. There are, however, mort- 
gages on valuable theatre proper- 
ties which must be met if the 
company is to avoid relinquish- 
ing its interest in those proper- 
ties, acquired at a very consider- 
able cost. The money must come 
from some place." . . . 



More on the same situation. 
Same spokesman, same interests, 
denies bondholders are even at- 
tempting to negotiate a "squeeze 
play" which will crowd the 
owners of over 3,000,000 shares of 
common outstanding when the 
Paramount reorganization finally 
is pieced together. There's been 
some talk, maybe irresponsible, 
maybe not, of this. "The real 
bona fide stockholders rate a defi- 
nite status in the picture. They'll 
get it. In the second division, 
however, are to be found stock- 
holders deliberately or accident- 
ally enmeshed in speculation 
which seeks a killing and a quick 
bow out of the picture. They rate 
little consideration." Admitted is 
the difficulty of distinguishing 
the worthy from the unworthy, 
the appellations being his, not 
ours. . . . 

T 

No unanimity of opinion pre- 
vails at Paramount over releasing 
time on the Mae West picture. 
George Schaefer said in Chicago 
the other day July 19 may be the 
date, conceding in the same 
breath that the dry cleaning may 
take longer. . . . As a matter of 
fact, the picture which puts a 
serious crimp into its owner's 
earning power by remaining in 
the studio, may go over until the 
fall. This is not remote as a 
possibility. The lambasting di- 
rected at the business from 
church quarters today makes the 



Eastman Pfd, Off 2 on Big Board 



High 

Columbia Pictures, vtc 29 

Consolidated Film Industries < 354 

Eastman Kodak "97 

Eastman Kodak, pfd 146 

Fox Film "A" 1356 

Loew's, Inc 2854 

Loew's, Inc*., pfd 92 

M-G-M, pfd. 2654 

Paramount Publix 354 



Low Close 



Pathe Exchange 
Pathe Exchange "A".... 

RKO 

Universal Pictures, pfd. 
Warner Bros 



254 
1954 
256 
38 
556 



145 

1356 

27J4 

92 

2654 

354 

2 

1956 
256 

38 
556 



354 
9656 
145 

1356 

28 
92 

2654 
354 
2 

1954 
256 
38 

554 



Technicolor Up % on Curb 



Technicolor 



High 

. 14 



Low 

1354 



Close 



Bond Issues Show Losses 



High Low Close 

General Theatre Equipment 6s '40 854 854 854 

General Theatre Equipment 6s '40, ctf 854 854 854 

Loew's 6s '41, ww deb rights 100 99Vg 100 

Paramount Broadway, 554s '50 4154 4154 4154 

Paramount Publix 554s '50 5056 5056 5054 

Pathe 7s '37, ww 98J4 9854 9856 

RKO 6s '41, pp 31 29 29 

Warner Bros. 6s '39, wd 55 54 54 



Net 




Change 


Sales 


- 54 


200 


+ 56 


100 


- % 


100 


—2 


10 




300 


— 54 


2,300 


+ *4 


100 




100 




400 




400 


- 54 


100 




400 




10 


- y» 


2,300 


Net 




Change 


Sales 


+ 56 


700 


Net 




Change 


Sales 


- 56 


1 


- 54 


9 


- 54 


3 


—154 


5 




3 


+ 54 


1 


-456 


3 


—1 


40 



i Purely 
Personal ► 

WALTER WANGER, Joseph 
C. Bernard, French producer ; 
Alfred Lunt, Lynx Fontaine and 
Charles Cochran, London theatrical 
producer, arrive today on the lie de 
France. 

Frank McCarthy, eastern sales 
manager for Universal, is one of those 
dignified executives who never re- 
moves his coat even with the mercury 
in the "90's." 

Sidney Samuelson isn't feeling so 
well these days. He'll try to be on 
hand today for the Allied of New 
Jersey meeting. 

Henri Diamont-Berger and Ber- 
nard Natan are back from the coast 
and plan to sail for France Saturday. 

Howard C. Cullman has sent S. 
R. Kent a telegram congratulating 
him on "Baby, Take a Bow." 

Genevieve Tobin, who arrived from 
a European vacation last week, leaves 
for the coast tomorrow. 

Samuel Hopkins Adams' novel, 
"The Gorgeous Hussy," has been 
bought by Radio. 

Gary and Mrs. Cooper are en route 
to New York from Hollywood on a 
vacation. 

Saul E. Rogers returns Thursday 
from an Independence Day vacation 
sailing. 

Joe Breen, who left here over the 
week-end, is due back in Hollywood 
today. 

Harry C. Arthur has gone to St. 
Louis and will be there all week. 

Peter Arno is in from the coast 
and stopping at the Warwick. 

Joe O'Reilly leaves for a Honolulu 
vacation Thursday. 

Irving Shiffron is boasting again. 



West films natural for attack, and 
that's a bit unfair, for the pic- 
ture has not been publicly shown 
anywhere throughout America. 



Demonstrating with signifi- 
cance what a delicate problem 
this widely disturbing question of 
outside opinion on pictures can be 
is the case of "Little Miss 
Marker" in Omaha. There the 
Catholic Standards Committee 
voted thumbs down one day 
ahead of opening at the Orpheum. 
Six days earlier the International 
Federation of Catholic Alumni 
had recommended it. The Omaha 
group explained its ideas were 
not always in accord with the 
International's and let it go at 
that. Two groups within the same 
faith thus view a given situation 
differently to the confusion of the 
producer and the exhibitor. How 
to solve it, particularly in a case 
like this where the subject mat- 
ter is emphatically more whole- 
some than objectionable ? A lot of 
eager ears are searching for the 
answer. . . . 

KANN 



> 



REPORT ON 
"OPERATOR 13" 



. . a • • 



TRADE PAPER EDITORS PLEASE NOTE! 

»»««.. •« ..♦»»# 

1 - BUSINESS is excellent everywhere. 

2- MARION DAVIES' work is praised in all press notices. 
Consensus of opinion indicates that this star's box-office 
draw is considerably enhanced by "Operator 13" follow- 
ing directly after her popular appearance in "Going 
Hollywood/' 

3- ADVERTISING angles incorporated in press sheet and 
Hearst newspaper campaign are being used to good 
advantage by showmen. 

4- CO-STARRING of Marion Davies and Gary Cooper is 
proving a happy selection for fans and all promotion 
stresses star names. 

5- WEALTH OF SELLING material pleases theatre 
managers. JEAN PARKER is getting especial attention, 
also Ted Healy and Four Mills Brothers. 

6- SONG EXPLOITATION very helpful "Sleepy Head" 
and "Jungle Fever" getting wide radio plug. 



Respectfully submitted by Leo of M-Q-M 



$2 




MADELEINE CARROLL 
FRANCHOT TONE 

Produced by Winfleld Sheehan 

Directed by John Ford 
Story and screen play by Reginald Berkeley 




WORDS FOR A $ 2 SMASH 



Film Daily: "Will give any fan his money's worth, even at road- 
show prices. Invested with wide appeal. Ranges from languorous 
smoothness in the love scenes to rapid-fire action." N. Y. American: 
"A notable addition to cinema's best ... an important event in the 
annals of motion picture history. A deeply stirring tale. Madeleine 
Carroll's is a deeply stirring performance." New York Daily News: 
"A lavish production, made on a grand scale with beautiful 
sets and fine photographic effects." N. Y. Daily Mirror: "Massive 
and spectacular film . . . magnificent drama . . . stirring and 
impressive love story . . . told with clarity and brilliance. 
Madeleine Carroll gives another sensitive and fine performance.' 
N.Y. Evening Journal: "Lovely, talented Madeleine Carroll 
makes her American debut an effective one. Filmed 
on a lavish scale." N.Y. World-Telegram: "Splendidly 
done. One of the most lavish and well-acted of the 
chronicle films ... a sterling and sympathetic exhibit... 
poignant and realistic." N.Y. Sun : "An ambitious under- 
taking. ..has plenty to offer as entertainment. Its pres- 
ence at the Criterion augurs well for the new season. 
Hollywood has produced another epic. 



"ITS PRESENCE AT THE 
CRITERION AUGURS WELL 
FOR THE NEW SEASON I " 

—New York Sun 








Ploying 
Two-a-day 

CRITE 

THEATRE 

ew Yor 
City 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Tuesday, July 3, 1934 



Further Delay 
Looked for On 
Fox Met. Sale 



Exchange Heads May 
Get Film Board Jobs 



(Continued from page 1) 

Judge Mack stated at an earlier hear- 
ing that the bondholders' voice would 
carry the greatest weight in any final 
action taken by the court. 

Skouras and Randforce, operators 
of the Fox Met circuit under the re- 
ceivership, and slated to continue in 
that capacity for the bondholders in 
the event no deal is consummated with 
outside bidders for the circuit, have 
vigorously opposed the several post- 
ponements of the court proceedings 
during the past few weeks. In each 
instance, however. Judge Mack has 
overruled their objections and advised 
them that any losses sustained by 
them since the date of the formal 
presentation of the joint Loew-War- 
ner $4,000,000 bid could be charged 
against the circuit if and when a deal 
was consummated. 

Meetings Held Daily 

Loew and Warner representatives 
have been meeting almost daily with 
a sub-committee of the Fox Met bond- 
holders' committee in an effort to 
effect an agreement on the terms of 
a sale of the circuit's assets. The 
Loew-Warner offer contemplates ac- 
quisition of the assets by the bond- 
holders who would then sell their 
87 leases and titles to Loew-Warner 
for $4,000,000. The bondholders' 
committee prefers to sell only its de- 
posited bonds to the bidders, thus 
placing the burden of reorganization 
upon Loew's and Warners. 

There are approximately $1,000, 
000 of Fox Met bonds which have 
not been deposited with the commit- 
tee, which represents slightly more 
than 85 per cent of a $12,500,000 is- 
sue. The Loew-Warner group fears 
that a purchase of the bonds, rather 
than the circuit's assets, would sub 
ject it to payment of heavy premiums 
before the balance of 15 per cent of 
the bond issue could be acquired. Re- 
ports were current yesterday that the 
bondholders' committee was ready to 
concede this point to the Loew-War- 
ner group and make the sale one of 
assets rather than of bonds. No con 
firmation could be obtained, however. 
A reliable source stated that while 
concessions had been made by both 
sides, a complete agreement was still 
some distance away. 

The likelihood still persists, too, 
that a new bidder may enter the pic- 
ture in the next few days. 



(Continued from page 1) 
ters, no Film Board offices would be 
maintained, but the branch managers 
of member companies of the M.P.P.- 
D.A. would meet regularly to dispose 
of the more significant and urgent 
work formerly handled by the Film 
Boards, it was stated. 

Augmenting the local groups and 
maintaining a direct contact between 
them, New York and other localities 
would be several Film Board agents, 
appointed to work in the field with 
roving commissions. 

The plan, it was emphasized, is 
merely one of several proposals on tap 
which may be the answer to the Film 
Boards' future. A definite recom- 
mendation is expected from a com- 
mittee, consisting of Abe Montague, 
Neil Agnew and Al Lichtman, ap- 
pointed for the purpose, in the near 
future. 



Para.-Capitol Pool 
Deal Awaits Action 

(Continued from page 1) 

circuit and final release of Para- 
mount's new Mae West picture are 
reported to have a bearing on the cur- 
rent delay. Though denied, reports 
persist that if the Loew-Warner bid 
for Fox Met is consummated, all 
Warner Broadway houses would be 
turned over to Loew's, in which event 
the Capitol-Paramount pool probably 
would be abandoned. The Mae West 
picture was slated to be the first to 
play the Capitol under the pooling 
arrangement. Re-makes have delayed 
its release and no outstanding picture 
is available to take its place as the 
first booking on the Capitol's non- 
stage show policy, which would be- 
come effective with the pooling. 



Appeal Groups Sit 
3 Days First Week 



(Continued from page 1) 

discussed. The only one for which 
witnesses appeared was the case of 
Leon Rosenblatt against Dave Wein- 
stock, the latter being charged with 
negotiating for the Orpheum, Jersey 
City, while Rosenblatt was operating. 
The New York grievance board re- 
cently refused to decide on the issue. 
Other cases involved reduced admis- 
sions and overbuying. 

Gradwell Sears, Harry Shi ff man 
and Leslie E. Thompson acted as the 
first committee and recommended de- 
cisions. 

J. Louis Geller is the independent 
exhibitor who will sit at Thursday's 
session. 

Until a list of committee nominees 
is approved, members of local boards 
are being enlisted to sit from day to 
day. Members of code boards from 
out of town also are eligible and are 
being asked to sit in on hearings when 
in town. 

The first group of names submitted 
to Campi was turned down by the 
body and ordered revamped. The sec- 
ond list is expected to be ratified 
July 12. 



Report Pecora in 
Fight on Kennedy 

(Continued from page 1) 

commission, the seniority thus be- 
stowed* on him weighing heavily in 
his favor as a logical choice for the 
chairmanship. Pecora is said to base 
his opposition on evidence developed 
at the recent Senate investigation of 
stock market operations which re- 
vealed Kennedy as a participant in 
the so-called alcohol stock pool of 
1933. 

A compromise proposal of naming 
Kennedy chairman to serve until Jan. 
1 only, is reported. 



No Waite Successor 
Soon, Says Schaefer 

(Continued from page 1) 

Waite's duties on a temporary basis 
will continue to do double duty by 
handling both divisions. 

Schaefer verified reports that the 
new title of the Mae West picture 
would not be "That St. Louis Wo 
man," as indicated earlier on the coast. 
Screencraft Prod, has already com- 
pleted a picture using that title and 
will release it soon. The new West 
picture will be re-titled and released 
as soon as remakes now in progress 
have been completed, it was stated 



Third Para. Regional On 

Washington, July 2. — Arriving 
from Dallas and Atlanta. Joseph J 
Unger today held the first of a two- 
day Paramount regional at the Shore- 
ham Hotel here. He returns Wednes- 
day to New York where the last of 
four regionals will take place at the 
Waldorf Astoria Thursday and 
Fridav. 



Neil Agnew and Charles Wiggin 
return from the coast Saturday. 



L. I. Rezoning Up Today 

Rezoning of Long Island will be 
discussed today by the advisory com- 
mittee of the New York clearance and 
zoning board. The schedule was to 
have come up yesterday. No griev- 
ances are on tap today, marking a 
second holiday in two weeks for this 
board. 



Coast Indies After 
An Eastern Contact 

(Continued from page 1) 

the clearance and zoning program he 
brought back from New York and 
stated all will be given a chance to 
talk at protest hearings. 

Ben Berinstein, president, appealed 
for funds for the eastern representa- 
tive idea, declaring that unless every- 
one contributed the organization might 
as well fold. 

Mrs. John Vruwink of the Univer 
sity group of California M. P. Coun 
cil talked on censorship cooperation 
and emphasized importance of family 
night programs. Mrs. William Burke 
chairman of Federated Women's Clubs 
also commended family entertainment 
Mrs. Leo B. Hedges, chairman of the 
M. P. division of the Parents Teach- 
ers Assn., pleaded for the return to 
familv entertainment. 



Cleveland's Indies 
Threaten an Appeal 

Cleveland, July 2. — If the clear 
ance board renders a decision grant 
ing 365 days protection over any the 
atre playing double features, such a 
decision will be appealed to Code Au 
thority. 

M. A. Lebensburger, manager of the 
local First Division branch, has made 
a formal objection to such a plan. Le- 
bensburger states that his company 
along with other local independents, 
will enter the appeal. 

All Cleveland theatres which were in 
operation at the time the agreement 
was signed, are set to go to single fea- 
tures on July 8. However, since the 
signing of the agreement, several 
houses which had been closed are to 
be opened by exhibitors who were not 
previously in the field. These houses, 
it is said, will offer dual bills. The 
Temple is the first to dual. 



Stewart in New Post 

Portland, July 2. — Howard Stew 
art, member of the John Hamrick 
staff and recently at the Music Box 
has been named manager of Ham- 
rick's Oriental. 



Broad Change 
In NRA Seen 
By New Order 



Washington, July 2. — Broad 
changes in the National Recovery 
Administration involving possibly the 
retirement of Gen. Hugh S. Johnson, 
to be succeeded by Clay S. Williams, 
North Carolina industrialist who has 
played an important part on the busi- 
ness advisory and planning council of 
the Department of Commerce, were 
today presaged by publication by the 
White House of an executive order 
signed by the President just prior to 
his leaving Washington today. 

The order creates an industrial 
emergency committee to centralize 
administration under one head of the 
heretofore uncoordinated activities of 
emergency agencies dealing with prob- 
lems of industrial recovery, labor dis- 
putes, relief and public works. 

Donald R. Richberg, chief counsel 
of the National Recoverv Administra- 
tion, will head the new committee and 
will also serve as executive secretary 
of the executive council and executive 
director of the National Emergency 
Council during the absence on vaca- 
tion of Frank C. Walker. Richberg 
has been detached from the recovery 
administration to devote his entire at- 
tention to his new duties. The other 
members of the new committee are 
Secretary of the Interior Ickes, Secre- 
tary of Labor Perkins, Recovery Ad- 
ministrator Johnson and Emergency 
Relief Administrator Hopkins. 

With Richberg at the head of the 
three bodies, the former general coun- 
sel of the recovery administration be- 
comes one of the President's chief 
lieutenants and a major factor in de- 
termining the policies of the organiza- 
tion in which he was formerly second 
man. 



Estimates Ohio Tax 
Will Cost $3,000,000 

(Continued from page 1) 

this on the average monthly tax col- 
lection of $300,000. With the clean film 
movements costing the exhibitors an- 
other yearly $3,000,000, Wood urges 
everv exhibitor in the state to get be- 
hind the proposed general sales tax as 
the only possible method of their sur- 
vival during the coming year. Only 
an adequate general sales tax, Wood 
contends, will relieve theatres of the 
present 10 per cent nuisance tax. 



Roxy, Music Hall Repeat 

With the Roxy and Music Hall 
grosses holding unusually well over 
the week-end, despite the heat, "Baby, 
Take a Bow" holds over at the former 
ho use and "Of Human Bondage" stays 
another stanza at the Sixth Ave. thea- 
tre. More than 48,000 persons attend- 
ed the Roxy giving the house a take 
of $13,700 for the three days. 

The Rialto with "Murder on the 
Blackboard" garnered a weak $9,500. 



Pola Negri Wins Claim 

Washington, July 2. — Pola Negri 
today_ was given a tax abatement of 
$28,853, resulting from an over-as- 
sessment on her 1926 return, accord- 
ing to the Bureau of Internal Reve- 



Tuesday, July 3, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



7 



MOTION PICTURE DAILY* 
HOLLYWOOD PREVIEW 



"Stamboul Quest" 

(M-G-M) 

Hollywood, July 2. — Romantic, dramatic and packed with showman- 
ship is this entertaining and well knit story of Germany's number one 
woman spy and her heart affair with an American in Berlin and Con- 
stantinople. 

Myrna Loy, ravishing with enhanced allurement and in love with 
George Brent, knows what Mata Hari fate awaits her if her feelings sur-. 
mount her duty. 

Resourceful Brent, having followed her to Constantinople, becomes 
tangled with her rendezvous until Miss Loy reveals her job. While per- 
mitting her to uncover the duplicity of a Turk, Henry Gordon, in testing 
her for complete loyalty, Lionel Atwill, her chief, informs her of Brent's 
death. This unbalances her mind. A prelude and an epilogue in a num- 
nery link romance for a happy ending. The production is classy and 
arresting. 

Miss Loy gives a convincing performance. Brent, as a light-hearted, 
romantic American, discloses ability hitherto unrevealed. Gordon is silky 
and finished as the heavy. Sam Wood's direction is smooth, imaginative 
and craftmanlike. Herman Mankiewicz adapted from Leo Birinski's 
story. Name values, interest in espionage and counter espionage, warm 
romance before hair trigger events, and the suspense engendered made 
this a sure-fire attraction. Running time, 87 minutes. 



"Our Daily Bread" 

(United Artists) 

Hollywood, July 2. — Departing from the usual romantic film formula 
and using broad, simple strokes without the modern screen technique, 
King Vidor wrote, produced and directed a film which should cause 
comment and controversy even though its box-office destiny is proble- 
matical. 

Based on the present economic dislocation and fundamental philosophy, 
it reveals a boy and a girl battling conditions together. They go back 
to the land, assembling thereon individuals and families, flivvering no- 
where until their gas gives out. 

Butchers, bakers, masons, carpenters, farmers, musicians and tailors 
contribute their talents, uniting in their common effort for the common 
weal. Drought halts their victory, but by superhuman courage they dig 
w ater through to their fields. This work and the flow of the water hits 
dramatic peaks charged with rhythmic action. 

The production is earthy, nature being the villain, with the people 
assuming pioneer proportion. Tom Keene and Karen Morley play the 
leads, with Miss Morley's sympathetic, finely tuned performance over- 
shadowing Keene's. Addison Richards is a standout as an ex-convict. 
Barbara Pepper reflects her appellation. 

Without marquee names, the basic, provocative idea may stir word of 
mouth to attract the customers. Running time, 90 minutes. 

"Charlie Chan's Courage" 

(Fox) 

Hollywood, July 2. — Based on Earl Derr Biggers' novel, "The Chi- 
nese Parrot," this measures up to the formula of previous Chan mystery 
thrillers and carries enough suspense to make it entertaining. 

Treatment, despite forced characters and situations, results in Warner 
Oland, playing the part of Chan, carrying the load of acting. It will 
please those seeking this type of story. 

It's locale is San Francisco and Palm Springs with the plot centered 
around a band of crooks trying to obtain a rare string of pearls in the 
possession of Chan, with whom they had been entrusted for delivery to 
a new buyer. The battle of wits between the gang and Chan makes it 
sufficiently interesting to sustain suspense until the last frame. This, of 
course, overshadows the romance between Drue Leyton and Donald 
Woods. The subtle, nonchalant antics of Chan inject a few spatter ings 
of humor, enough to keep the mystery element from becoming too heavy. 
With the colorful desert scenery, the picture is mounted artistically and 
is pleasing to the eyes. George Hadden directed and Hal Mohr photo- 
graphed from screen play by Seton I. Miller. Running time, 74 minutes. 



"Marker" and 
Ellington Big 
In Pittsburgh 



Pittsburgh, July 2. — Considering 
the heat, business in town wasn't bad 
last week. Big money went to the 
Penn, where the combination of "Lit- 
tle Miss Marker" and Duke Elling- 
ton's band proved a winner at $23,000. 
The Fulton also topped average bv 
almost $1,000. getting around $5,400 
with "Such Women Are Dangerous" 
and the Baer-Carnera fight pictures. 

Other grosses were only moderate, 
although the Warner bettered par with 
"Xo Greater Glory" and "The Most 
Precious Thing in Life" at $5,300. 
The Stanley slipped considerably with 
"Many Happy Returns" at $6,700, and 
the Regent, with "Let's Talk It Over" 
and "The Love Captive," hit a new 
low at SI, 100. 

Total first run grosses were $42,000. 
Average is $41,000. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing June 30 : 

"SUCH WOMEN ARE DANGEROUS" 
(Fox) 

BAER-CARNERA FIGHT 

FULTOX— (1,750). 15c-40c, 6 days. Gross: 
$3,400. (Average, $4,500) 

"LITTLE MISS MARKER" (Para.) 

PEXX— (3.300), 2Sc-75c, 6 days. Stage: 
Duke Ellington's band with Ivie Anderson, 
Snakeships Tucker, Palmer Bros, and 
Miller Bros. Gross: $23,000. (Average, $21,- 
000) 

"MANY HAPPY RETURNS" (Para.) 

STAXLEY— (3,600), 25c-50c, 6 days. 
Gross: $6,700. (Average. $9,000) 

"LETS TALK IT OVER" (Univ.) 
"THE LOVE CAPTIVE" (Univ.) 
REGEXT— (900). 25c-35c, 6 days. Gross: 
$1,100. (Average. $1,500) 

"NO GREATER GLORY" (Col.) 
"MOST PRECIOUS THING IN LIFE" 
(Columbia) 

WARXER— (2,000). 25c-40c, 6 days. Gross: 
$5,300. (Average, $5,000) 

Protest Stops Run 
Of Hitler Picture 

Buffalo, July 2. — "Hitler's Reign 
of Terror" was withdrawn from the 
Hollywood here today after two show- 
ings, as a result of protests having 
been filed against the showing of the 
him by Alphonse Karl, German con- 
sul here, and Herman Schmidt, in be- 
half of the German-American United 
Front. Basil Bros., operators of the 
Hollywood, had leased it to Jewel 
Prod, for this picture, but closed the 
house when protests were made. 

Al Leonze, Jewel representative, 
declared the withdrawal was only 
temporary and the film will be shown 
at another Buffalo theatre shortly. 



Portland, July 2. — "Hitler's Reign 
of Terror," which was set in seven 
Pantages houses here, has been can- 
celed after a three-day run on the 
protest of A. H. Closterman, German 
Consul, and others. 



McGowan to Do Shorts 

Hollywood, July 2. — Negotiations 
have been completed for Robert Mc- 
Gowan to produce and direct 13 one- 
reel "Variety" shorts for Paramount 
at the Mack Sennett studios. The 
group will be made in Technicolor. 



Change Crawford Title 

Hollywood, July 2.— M-G-M has 
changed the title of the Joan Craw- 
ford picture, "Sacred and Profane 
Love," to "Chained." 



Additions to Lasky List 

Hollywood, July 2. — "The White 
Parade" and "Casanova, the Immortal 
Lover" are additions to Jesse L. 
Lasky's program to be produced for 
Fox. This makes a total of eight. 



West more Recovering 

Hollywood, July 2. — Wally West- 
more, chief makeup artist at Para- 
mount, is recovering from a rush ap- 
pendicitis operation performed at the 
Hollywood Hospital. 



"Operator 13" 
And Band Big 
Cleveland Hit 



Cleveland, July 2. — In spite of a 
continued heat wave, Loew's State had 
an outstanding gross of $14,000, up by 
$4,000, on "Operator 13" and Phil 
Spitalny and his band. 

One other house, Warners' Lake, 
succeeded in reaching a par $2,000 on 
"The Party's Over" and "The Crime 
of Helen Stanley." 

Total first run business was $33,400. 
Average is $34,000. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing June 29 : 

"HALF A SINNER" (Univ.) 

ALLEN— (3,300), 20c-30c-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $2,800. (Average, $3,000) 

"CIRCUS CLOWN" (F. N.) 

WARNERS' HIPPODROME — (3,800), 30c- 
35c-44c, 7 days. Gross: $4,100. (Average, 
$5,000) 

"THE PARTY'S OVER" (Col.) 
"THE CRIME OF HELEN STANLEY" 
(Columbia) 

WARNERS' LAKE— (800), 30c-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $2,000. (Average, $2,000) 

"COCKEYED CAVALIERS" (Radio) 

RKO PALACE— (3,100), 30c-35c-44c, 7 
days. Gross: $7,500. (Average, $10,000) 
"OPERATOR 13" (M-G-M) 

LOEW'S STATE— (3,400), 30c-35c-44c, 7 
days. Added attraction: Phil Spitalny and 
his 32-girl band. Gross: $14,000. (Average, 
$10,000) 

"PRIVATE SCANDAL" (Para.) 
"CITY LIMITS" (Monogram) 

LOEW'S STILLMAN— (1,900), 20c-30c- 
40c, 7 days. Gross: $3,000. (Average, $4,000) 

Tec- Art Hearing to 
Be Held on Friday 

Los Angeles, July 2. — Hearing on 
the trustee's report, petition for a final 
dividend and a petition for sale or 
abandonment of uncollected accounts 
of Tec-Art Studios will be held Fri- 
day by Referee Rupert B. Turnbull. 

The report shows receipts of $22,- 
205.17, disbursements of $17,901.79, 
with a balance on hand of $4,303.38. 
Claims proved and allowed total $117,- 
602.08. Additional claims filed are 
$683.20. Fees applied for are: Wil- 
liam H. Moore, Jr., trustee, $362.05; 
Charles J. Katz and Walter C. Durst, 
attorneys for trustee, $1,400. 



Coast Board Sets Date 

Los Angeles, July 2. — In the griev- 
ance case of Vitagraph vs. A. R. Mill- 
er, operator of the Baldwin Park, 
the board has prepared a resolution 
stating that Miller must start dating 
his pictures by July 6, or a desist 
order will be sent to all film companies 
to prevent him from getting prints. 



Collier with Ad Firm 

Hollywood, July 2. — Robert Col- 
lier, former director of advertising 
and publicity for F. W. C, and more 
recently connected with F. & M. in an 
executive capacity, has become affili- 
ated with the Biow Co. as account 
and radio executive. Collier left for 
New York last week. 



Tracy in Hospital 

Hollywood, July 2. — As a result of 
a fall from a horse while riding at the 
Riviera Country Club, Spencer Tracy 
is in Hollywood Hospital today where 
Dr. William Branch is treating him 
for strained muscles of the back. 
Tracy expects to be confined to bed 
for a week. 



i 



FOUR STARS 






WANDA HALE in N. Y. DAILY NEWS (four stars ★★★★) 

Yesterday's premiere audience at the Music Hall broke out in unrestrained applause. Radio Pictures 
has turned out in "Of Human Bondage" a picture that is at once absorbing, intense and convincing. 
Such a piece of Filmcraft certainly could not have been turned out with any actor of less brilliance than 
Leslie Howard, who invests his role with a sympathy and an understanding that fit almost exactly the 
fine and sensitive demands of the W. Somerset Maugham classic . . . here we find Bette Davis doing 
a job that is so revealing as to make one ask, "Where's that girl been all this while?". . . deserved glory. 

REGINA CREWE in N. Y. AMERICAN 

The milling throngs that stormed the Radio City Music Hall yesterday attested to the fact that a 
Hollywood hero does not necessarily have to be an Adonis or a crooner to succeed. Leslie Howard 
has made an indelible impression on the minds of men and the hearts of women . . . the film is a 
poignant portrait, sympathetically treated by Director John Cromwell and glossed by the polished 
performances of an unusually fine cast. 

RICHARD WATTS, JR. in N. Y. HERALD TRIBUNE 

Leslie Howard must certainly be the most satisfying actor on the English-speaking stage. There is a 
splendid air of Tightness about everything he does. Thereupon, the mere fact of his appearance in 
the screen edition of that brilliant novel, "Of Human Bondage", provides the picture with dignity, 
power and dramatic effectiveness. As a photoplay, "Of Human Bondage" is definitely superior to 
the average . . . well written . . . good photoplay, made something more than that by Mr. Howard's 
perfect performance. 

WILLIAM BOEHNEL in N. Y. WORLD-TELEGRAM 

A dignified, sensitive, eminently satisfying screen treatment has been accorded "OfHu man Bondage". 
W. Somerset Maugham's magnificent story. . .the film now on view at the Radio City Music Hall 
emerges a distinguished contribution to the cinema . . . adapted by Lester Cohn with such fine ap- 
preciation for the muted sorrow that is hidden in the novel's pages . . . that it has, as precious few- 
films can claim to have, a true beauty in its writing. John Cromwell has dope an extra fine job of 
irection, and the performances are excellent. Leslie Howard comes off with the first honors. 

LESLIE h 

IN W. SOMERSET MA 

HUMAN 



RKO-RADIO 
PICTURE 



WITH 



BETTE DAVIS.. 



FRANCES DEE..KAY J(| 



. . N. Y. DAILY NEWS 





BLAND JOHANESON in N. Y. DAILY MIRROR 

A brilliantly acted film version of the Maugham novel. 

Miss Davis will astound you ... a dramatic character actress of overwhelming power. Touching 
and infinitely tender, it is a simple description of a devastating fascination. Leslie Howard's per- 
formance is exquisite. He plays it with his usual warmth, tenderness and understanding. 

MORDAUNT HALL in N. Y. TIMES 

The very lifelike quality of the story and the marked authenticity of its atmosphere cause the specta- 
tors to hang on every word uttered by the interesting group of characters . . . one might be tempted to 
say that his portrait of Philip Carey excels any performance he has given before the camera. No more 
expert illustration of getting under the skin of the character has been done in motion pictures. 

Another enormously effective portrayal is that of Bette Davis . . . outburst of applause when the 
him came to an end. John Cromwell, the director, has given many a subtle and imaginative touch 
to his scenes. There is nothing stereotyped about this film. 

EILEEN CREELMAN in N. Y. SUN 

Once in a while it happens that a fine book may become a fine picture. Of Somerset Maugham s 
modern classic, "Of Human Bondage", be it gratefully recorded, this is true. 

Adaptor Lester Cohen, and director John Cromwell, have treated the book with honesty and vigor. 

Leslie Howard, of course, is perfectly cast . . . Bette Davis's portrayal of the tawdry Cockney 
waitress, a performance as humorous as it is powerful, was something of a surprise. This Miss Davis 
is an actress rather than a screen beauty in this difficult part. It is, this "Of Human Bondage", a 
picture to be seen. 

ROSE PELSWICK in N. Y. EVENING JOURNAL 

In transferring "Of Human Bondage" to the screen, director John Cromwell and adaptor Lester 
Cohen have done well . . . with intelligent understanding, those responsible for the picture have 
made it a sombrely interesting narrative. Bette Davis sheds the artificiality of her previous parts, 
, and her portrait of the tawdry waitress, Mildred, is excellent even to her Cockney accents . . 
yesterday noon's Music Hall audience broke into enthusiastic applause. 

The picture is handsomely mounted and was obviously filmed with a great deal of care and thought 

DWARD I 

lAM'S GREAT NOVEL 

BONDAGE 

_ PANDRO S. BERMAN 

ON.. REGINALD DENNY.. DIRECTED BY JOHN CROMWELL executive producer 




J 



MOTION PICTURE 

| " ^ — "PT'DjAlI Tuesday, July 3, 1934 



Columbia Conventioneers at Their Opening Session 




Columbia Sets 26 
Of 48 New Titles 



(Continued from page 1) 

G. Robinson-Howard Hawks produc- 
tion, one with Claudette Colbert, one 
co-starring vehicle with Jack Holt and 
Edmund Lowe, and two starring ve- 
hicles for Jack Holt. This is to be 
known as the "March On" group. 

Individual announcements will be 
made from time to time on eight spe- 
cials, it was stated. 

Eight Tim McCoy westerns will be 
included. 

The shorts list will be made up of 
26 two-reel comedies featuring Harry 
Langdon, Andy Clyde, Leon Errol and 
Walter Catlett. Eight single-reel se- 
ries will include "Color Rhapsodies," 
"Krazy Kat" cartoons, "Scrappy" 
cartoons, "Laughing With Medbury" 
travelogues, "Life's Last Laughs" pro- 
duced by C. S. Clancy ; "Spice of 
Life," produced by Mentone Prod, 
from material selected from the Lit- 
erary Digest; "World of Sport," and 
"Screen Snapshots." 

The list follows : 

"Broadway Bill." a Frank Capra pro- 
duction. Adapted from Mark Hellinger's 
short story "Strictly Confidential," with 
Warner Baxter, Myrna toy, Raymond 
Walburn, Lynn Overman, Clarence Muse, 
Sterling Halloway. 

Another Frank Capra production. 

"One Night of Love," with Grace 
Moore, a musical based on the stage play 
by Dorothy Speare and Charles Beahan. 
Directed by Victor Schertzinger. 

"Feather in Her Hat." by I. A. R. Wy- 
lie. best seller. 

An Edward G. Robinson-Howard Hawks 
production. 

"Party Wire," from the Bruce Manning 
best seller. 

A Claudette Colbert production. 

"Maid of Honor." from the Cosmopolitan 
story by Katharine Brush. 

"Carnival," by Robert Riskin. Described 
as a dramatic romance. 

"The Girl Friend," musical extravaganza 
by Herbert Fields, Richard Rodgers and 
Lorenz Hart, featuring Jack Haley and 
Lupe Velez. Russell Mack director. A 
William Rowland production. 

A Jack Holt-Edmund Lowe production. 
Comedy. 

"Ladv Beware," comedy drama. 
"Black Room Mystery," starring Boris 
Karloff. 

"Sure Fire." from the play by Ralph 
Murphy. Starring Gene Raymond and 
Ann Sothern. 

"Mills of the Gods." drama by Melville 
BaWr and Tack Kirkland. 

"Depths Below," melodrama starring 
Jack Holt. 

Two additional Jack Holt starring ve- 
hicles. 

"Breakfast for Two," honeymoon farce. 



What They're Down For 



Atlantic City, July 2. — Two mu- 
sicals are included in the Columbia 
lineup, one to be produced by Wil- 
liam Rowland with Russell Mack di- 
recting. It will be "The Girl Friend" 
and will star Russell Mack and Lupe 
Velez. The other is "One Night of 
Love" starring Grace Moore. 

An important co-starring vehicle 
will have Jack Holt and Edmund 
Lowe. 

The lineup so far set follows : 

Women Players 

Claudette Colbet in an untitled starring 
vehicle. 

Myrna Loy — "Broadway Bill." 

Grace Moore — "One Night of Love.." 

Ann Sothern — Starring in "Sure Fire" 

with Gene Raymond. 
Lupe Velez — "The Girl Friend." 

Men Players 

Robert Allen — "Broadway Bill." 



Jack Haley — "The Girl Friend." 

Sterling Halloway — "Broadway Bill." 

Jack Holt — One co-starring with Ed- 
mund Lowe; starring alone in "Depths 
Below" and two others. 

Boris Karloff — "Black Room Mystery." 

Edmund Lowe — Co-starring in one with 
Jack Holt. 

Tim McCoy — Eight untitled westerns. 

Clarence Muse— "Broadway Bill." 

Lynn Overman — "Broadway Bill." 

Gene Raymond — Starred in "Sure Fire." 

Edward G. Robinson — Special with How- 
ard Hawks directing and with Ann 
Sothern. 

Raymond Walburn — "Broadway Bill." 



Directors 



Frank Capra — ''Broadway Bill" and one 
other. 

Howard Hawks — Special with Edward G. 

Robinson starred. 
Russell Mack — "The Girl Friend." 
William Rowland — Producer of "The Girl 

Friend." 

Victor Schertzinger — "One Night of 
Love." 



"Eight Bells," stage drama by Percy G. 
Mandley. 

"Once a Gentleman," from the Bradley 
King story. 

"That's Gratitude." stage comedy by 
Frank Craven. 

"Spring 3100." melodrama from the stage 
play by Argyll Campbell. 

"Man Proof," comedy drama. 

"Murder Island," from the story by Le- 
land Jamieson. Aviation background. 

"Mistaken Identity," story of a girl who 
lived another woman's life. 

"Lady of New York," sophisticated girl 
story with New York background. 

"Private Property," girl story with prin- 
cipal character enmeshed in intrigue. 

"Unknown Woman." girl story. 

"$25 an Hour," stage comedy by Gladys 
Unger and Leyla Georgi. 

"I Confess," listed as the story of a 
girl who bared her heart to the world. 



Columbia's List Names 
56 Stars; 16 Directors 

Atlantic City, July 2. — Listed in 
the talent under contract for Colum- 
bia's new season list are 56 stars and 
featured players, 16 directors and pro- 
ducers, 22 well known authors and 
20 studio writers. 

The players are: Women — Jean Arthur, 
Mona Barrie, Patricia Caron, Nancy Car- 
roll, Claudette Colbert, Inez Courtney, 
Shirley Grey. Myrna Loy, Geneva Mitch- 
ell. Grace Moore. Florence Rice, Jessie 
Ralph, Barbara Read, Ann Sothern. Lupe 
Velez and Fay Wray; men — Luis Alberni. 
Robert Allen, Warner Baxter. Ralph Bel- 
lamv, Tames Blakelv, John Mack Brown, 
Tohn Buckler. El Brendel, Tullio Carmi- 
nati. Walter Catlett. Andy Clyde, Walter 



Connolly, Donald Cook. Richard Cromwell, 
Allyn Drake, Leon Errol, Larry Fine, John 
Gilbert, Jack Haley. Richard Heming, Ar- 
thur Hohl, Jack Holt, Jerry Howard. Moe 
Howard, Boris Karloff, Fred Keating. Harry 
Langdon, Peter Lorre. Edmund Lowe. Tim 
McCoy. George Murphy. Clarence Muse, 
Lynn Overman. Arthur Rankin, Gene Ray- 
mond, Edward G. Robinson. Charles Sabin. 
Lyle Talbot and Raymond Walburn. 

Directors — Irving Briskin. Leo Bulga- 
kov, David Burton, Frank Capra. Howard 
Hawks. Lambert Hillyer, D. Ross Leder- 
man. Russell Mack, Roy William Neill. 
Robert North, Albert Rogell, William 
Rowland. Everett Riskin. Victor Schertz- 
inger, Jules White and Felix Young. 

Authors — Melville Baker, Charles Bea- 
han, Diane Bourbon, Katharine Brush, 
Argyll Campbell, Frank Craven, Herbert 
Fields, Leyla Georgi. Lorenz Hart, Mark 
Hellinger, Leland Jamieson. Bradley King. 
Tack Kirkland, Percy G. Mandley. Bruce 
Manning. Ralph Murphy. Richard Rodgers. 
Harry B. Smith. Dorothy Speare. Leon- 
ard Spigelgass. Gladvs Unger, and I. A. R. 
Wylie. 

Studio writers — Herbert Asbury. Sidney 
Buchman. Vera Casparv. Harvey Gates. 
Tames Gow. Lawrence Hazard. Ethel Hill. 
r>orothy Howell. Judith Kandel. S. K. 
Lauren, Fred Niblo. Tr.. Austin Parker. 
Roland Pertwee. Robert Riskin. Ray 
Schrcck. Harold Shumate. Jo Swerling, 
John Texlev, M. Coates Webster and Ed- 
mund Worth. 



Caspar y on "Sure Fire" 

Hollywood, Julv 2. — Vera Casparv 
draws the Columbia assignment to do 
a treatment on "Sure Fire," which 
will star Gene Raymond. 



Columbians Cheer 
Jack Cohn Speech 



(Continued from page 1) 

shifted to the latter because the mo- 
tion picture reflects the thing against 
which the crusaders inveigh — the ten- 
dencies of the times. 

"They have directed their ire against 
the mirror, instead of against the thing 
or condition reflected in the mirror. 

"Sophistication is the one word that 
describes the fault universally charged 
against films. We are living in an era 
of sophistication and reflected in the 
conduct of city dwellers from coast to 
coast and reflected in the newspapers 
they read, and in American literature 
as a whole. To the extent that the 
motion picture holds the mirror up to 
Nature it reflects the same sophistica- 
tion, against which many of us inveigh 
in vain. 

"Like every other human effort, mo- 
tion pictures have faults and short- 
comings. It may perhaps prove of 
benefit to producers to have their 
errors of omission and commission 
forcibly brought to their attention even 
in so rough and unfair a manner — for 
I insist that indiscriminate abuse of 
the industry is most unfair. And in 
making this assertion I hold no brief 
for off-color entertainment." 



Harry S ping old Passes 

Word has been received here of the 
death of Harry W. Spingold, of the 
radio department of the William Mor- 
ris Agency, from a heart attack while 
en route to New York from Chicago 
w : here he had been resting after a 
recent illness. Nate Spingold, Colum- 
bia executive, was informed of his 
brother's death while attending his 
company's sales convention in Atlantic 
City yesterday. 



Col. Starts Eighth Short 

Hollywood, July 2. — The eighth 
and last of Columbia's musical short 
series, went into production today 
under the direction of Archie Gotteler, 
who penned the script in collaboration 
with Ewart Adamson. 



Hillyer to Do Short 

Hollywood, July 2. — Columbia does 
number 11 of the "Minute Mystery" 
series this week. 



Tuesday, July 3, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



"Black Moon" and 
Show Top Oklahoma 



Ritzing It with Columbia 



Oklahoma City, July 2. — "Black 
Moon - ' and a stage show for four days 
at the Liberty ran away with top 
money here last week. The $2,300 take 
was better than an ordinary week's 
business. For the last three days the 
house put on "Sweetheart of Sigma 
Chi," and this also did a good busi- 
ness at SI, 200. 

Heat hit other spots. Total first 
run business was $12,600. Average is 
$13,500. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ins June 30 : 

"LIFE OF VIRGIE WINTERS" (Radio) 

CRITERION — (1,700), 10c-20c-36c-41c-56c, 7 
days. Gross: $3,500. (Average, $5,000) 
"LITTLE MISS MARKER" (Para.) 
MIDWEST— (1,500), 10c-26c-36c-56c, 7 
days. Gross: $3,600. (Average, $4,000) 
"LOOKING FOR TROUBLE" (U. A.) 
CAPITOL — (1,200). 10c-20c-26c-36c-41c, 7 
days. Gross: $2,000. (Average, $2,500) 
"BLACK MOON" (Col.) 
LIBERTY — (1,500). 10c-15c-26c-36c, 4 days. 
Stage: "Chicago Follies." Gross: $2,300. 
"SWEETHEART OF SIGMA CHI" 
(Monogram) 
LIBERTY— (1,500), 10c-15c-26c-36c, 3 days. 
Gross: $1,200. (Average week, $2,000) 

Shea Firms Go Into 
New Operating Setup 

Buffalo, July 2. — Reorganization of 
the companies headed by the late 
Michael Shea has been effected, with 
Buffalo Theatres, Inc., superseding the 
Shea Theatre Corp. and other sub- 
sidiaries except Erie Operating Co. 

Stock in Buffalo Theatres, Inc., is 
held by the McNaughton Realty Co., 
Inc. ; Paramount and M-G-M, and by 
Vincent R. McFaul, who was Shea's 
vice-president and general manager. 
McFaul becomes president and gen- 
eral manager of the new company. 
Other officers and directors will be 
elected next week. 

Buffalo Theatres, Inc., was organ- 
ized to operate Shea's Buffalo, Hip- 
podrome and Court Street properties 
owned by the McNaughton company. 
Shea's Century, leased from Max 
Yellen, and the Shea community and 
suburban theatres continue, for the 
present at least, to be managed by the 
Erie Operating Co. 



Plans Feature Comedies 

Hollywood, July 2. — Jed Buell, 
former Alack Sennett executive, has 
formed Rainbow Pictures to make fea- 
ture comedies in association with Jo- 
seph Klein. The latter recently ar- 
rived from New York. First feature 
win Be "College Sweetheart" with 
Andy Clyde, Grady Sutton, Frankie 
Eastman, Mary Kornmann. The sec- 
ond will co-star Harry Langdon and 
Clyde. 



Para. Signs Players 

Hollywood, July 2. — Carole Lom- 
bard was signed by Paramount today 
to a two year contract giving the 
studio the exclusive use of her serv- 
ices. Mary Boland was also signed 
for six more pictures and the song 
writing team of Harry Revel and 
Mack Gordon had their option re- 
newed for two more years. 



On Aviation Board 

Hollywood, July 2. — A. J. Berres, 
alternate member of the Studio Labor 
Board, has been appointed a member 
of the Aviation Board commission in 
Washington by President Roosevelt. 
His successor on the Labor Board 
has not been appointed as yet. 



Atlantic City, July 2. — Sixteen 
branches comprising the eastern di- 
vision and two Canadian branches are 
attending the meeting. They are 
Albany, Atlanta, Boston, Buffalo, 
Charlotte, Cincinnati, Cleveland, 
Dallas, Memphis, New Haven, New 
Orleans, New York, Oklahoma City, 
Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Washington, 
and Toronto and Montreal. The Ca- 
nadian contingent is headed by Louis 
Rosenfeld, W. Elman and G. H. 
Coplan. 

• 

Lou Weinberg, another member of 
the home office sales staff, has thrown 
his famous diet to the winds. "I'm 
here to combine relaxation with 
work," he declared. "How can I re- 
lax if I don't eat?" 

• 

Al Seligman, home office accessory 
sales manager, is sternly resisting the 
lure of the beach because of his de- 
sire to help clean up whatever final 
details remain to make this conven- 
tion a success. 

• 

Milt Hannock, in charge of the 
contract department, has been scared 
to death ever since somebody slipped 
him the information that he would 
be called upon to make a speech. It's 
a gag, but he hasn't gotten wise to it 
yet. 

• 

George Brown, director of public 
relations, assisted by Exploitation 
Chief Lou Goldberg and Publicity 
Chief Ben Atwell, has done a high- 
ly effective job in making the con- 
vention city Columbia-conscious. 
From the railroad station, throughout 
the entire boardwalk, there is ample 
evidence that the convention is being 
held in town. 

Remembering his experience with 
the ocean last year, General Sales 
Manager Abe Montague is treating 
that body of water more respectfully 
this year. He is taking no more 
chances of acquiring bruised ribs. 
• 

The passing year saw the promo- 
tion of Sam Galanty to a district 
managership with supervision over 
Washington, Pittsburgh and Cincin- 
nati. His fellow Columbians have 
been taking the opportunity to extend 
congratulations in person. Galanty 
is still the perfect example of what 
the well-dressed man should wear. 
• 

Counselor Bill Jaffe was ob- 
served in a state of complete relaxa- 
tion on the beach, looking as if he 
had been dipped in butter preparatory 



to frying. Taking no chances with 
the sun's rays he frequently applied 
olive oil to the epidermis. 

• 

Both weighing in the neighborhood 
of 300 pounds, "Tiny" Rogovin, New 
Haven manager, and Charlie 
Johnston, Albany manager, strolled 
down the boardwalk. Observing them, 
Joe Miller, Buffalo manager, de- 
clared, "And still people say there is 
a shortage of beef." 

• 

To Hank Brunet goes the credit 
for the excellent arrangements made 
to house the convention crowd and 
to his assistant, Hank Kaufman, as 
well. This is the first time the Co- 
lumbians have stopped at the Ritz- 
Carlton and they seem to enjoy the 
change in surroundings. 

• 

Again Harry Weiner, Philadel- 
phia manager, shows his interest in the 
entertainment welfare of his brother 
Columbians by obtaining for them the 
courtesy of the various Warner 
houses. Weiner has also promised 
some unusual entertainment surprises 
for the banquet, which will wind up 
the convention. 

• 

Maurice Grad, director of sales 
promotion, was observed jotting mys- 
terious notes on a pad of paper. An 
investigation revealed that Grad helps 
edit the Beacon Junior which each 
day Winchellizes the activities of the 
boys. 

• 

Messrs. Rosenfeld, Elman and 
Coplan, wanting to be sure of the 
quality of their liquid refreshments, 
brought a generous supply of their 
own with them from the Maple Leaf 
Dominion. 

• 

Sam Moscow, southern district 
manager, was observed seated in 
front of a piano at the Ritz where 
he punished some of the old time 
sdhgs for the benefit and edification 
of those Columbians who fancy them- 
selves vocalists. Next to selling film 
the old Colonel would sooner bang 
away at the piano keys than anything 
else. 

• 

Art Levy, Pittsburgh manager, got 
off a nifty while discussing an exhibi- 
tor with whom he tried to do business 
last season. "The trouble with him," 
said Art, "is that he can't ever make 
up his mind. If he went horseback- 
riding, he would mount four horses 
simultaneously and ride off in all 
directions." 



1 1 



Contract Breaches 
Not Campi Matter 



Declaring it cannot act in com- 
plaints involving breach of contract 
and designation of preferred playing 
dates, Campi has dismissed appeals 
filed by United Artists and M-G-M. 

The U. A. case originally was filed 
against A. L. Adams, Palace, Silver- 
ton, Ore., for breach of contract and 
when it came before the Seattle board 
it was referred to Campi. Code Au- 
thority, in dismissing the complaint, 
stated: "We have no jurisdiction to 
determine complaints of this natuue, 
and in our discretion we refuse to de- 
termine complaints of this nature." 

In the M-G-M grievance against L. 
L. Drake, Ansonia, Wadesboro, N. C, 
the Charlotte board refused to direct 
the exhibitor to furnish preferred play- 
ing time according to contracts. The 
opinion of Campi held that under Ar- 
ticle V-E, Part 9 (b), the board is 
limited only to relieving an exhibitor 
from the obligation to play a picture. 
Having no other powers in that con- 
nection, the parties are left to resort 
to legal remedies. 

The decision of the Philadelphia 
grievance board in the case of Louis 
Linker, Criterion, Bridgeton, N. J., 
against Stanley, same city, was af- 
firmed, but amended to read that the 
respondent's policy is not unfair and 
that the defendant will immediately 
select pictures on his selective con- 
tracts so that the complainant can 
negotiate for those turned down from 
Columbia and Universal lists. 

The complaint of J. M. Anderson, 
Princess, Boone, la., against Central 
States Theatres Corp., Rialto, same 
city, on building a new theatre was 
dismissed. 



Mexico Excited Over 
New Historical Film 

By JAMES LOCKHART 

Mexico City, July 2. — Mexico City 
is excited over the new, independently 
produced "Juarez y Maximiliano" 
(Juarez and Maximilian) based upon 
episodes of the French Empire period. 
Though some of the criticisms were 
unfavorable in that the critics claimed 
the film was nothing more than a 
series of scenes of the period, the film 
is commanding the highest price of any 
picture in this country. The Principal, 
which was a legitimate house for two 
centuries, is housing the film. Colum- 
bia is handling the release. 



Lasky to Do Nurse Yarn 

Hollywood, July 2. — Jesse L. Las- 
ky's first on his new. program for Fox 
will be "The White Parade," a yarn 
dealing with student-nurses, based on 
a forthcoming novel by Rian James, 
who is also writing the screen play in 
collaboration with Jesse Lasky, Jr. 
An all star cast will be featured. 

The picture gets under way August 
6 under the direction of Irving Cum- 
mings. 



Willentz Will Appeal 

Clearance complaint filed by the 
Ellwood, Newark, against Warners' 
Regent in that city and the Capitol, 
Belleville and lost by decision of the 
New York clearance and zoning 
board will be appealed to Campi by 
David T. Willentz who represented 
Allied of New Jersey in the action. 



Hollywood Personals 

Hollywood, July 2. — Charles Butterworth standing by with a 
severe case of sunburn. . . . Virginia and Maxine Loomis get first 
roles under their Fox contract in "Fun on the Air." . . . Carl 
Brisson's new Benedict Canyon home will be known as "Koben- 
havn." . . . Pauline Lord's highly pedigreed Pekingese' registered 
name is actually "Garbage," and Pauline has actually changed it 
to "Gaboochican." . . . Enrico Caruso, Jr., on a diet. . . . Aline 
MacMahon back from Broadway. Eddie Robinson, too. . . . Doro- 
thy Dare's first with Warners in "Gentlemen Are Born." . . . Jack 
Oakie and Norman McLeod, a twosome at the Lakeside Golf Club. 
. . . Jack Haley has a new Buick. . . . Charles Laughton wants to 
take up polo. . . . Charles R. Rogers and Bill LeBaron lunching 
at Levy's. . . . 



12 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Tuesday, July 3, 1934 



Review Board 
Seeks Early 
End of Campi 



(Continued from pape 1) 

itself, but is taking a "recess" until 
July 10 in order to give the President 
opportunity to decide whether he 
wishes it to continue with the investi- 
gation of more than ISO codes against 
which complaints have been filed but 
on which no action has been taken. 
The board still has about $10,000 of 
its original $50,000 appropriation. 

"It may be safely said that not in 
many years have monopolistic tenden- 
cies in industry been so forwarded and 
strengthened as they have through the 
perversion of an act excellently in- 
tended to restore prosperity and pro- 
mote the general welfare," the board 
charged in its report. 

Authorities "Burdensome" 

"The present method of setting up 
code authorities is sadly defective and 
the cost of administration is, in many 
cases, expensive and sometimes heavily 
burdensome to the smaller interests of 
the industry." Administration mem- 
bers should be selected "with an eye 
single to their fitness and qualifica- 
tions for the duties to be assumed" 
and they should be entitled to vote 
upon all questions. 

"In virtually all the codes we have 
examined," the board commented, "one 
condition has been persistent, undeni- 
able and apparent to any impartial 
observer. It is this, that the code has 
offered an oportunity for the more 
powerful and more profitable interests 
to seize control of an industry or to 
augment and extend a control already 
obtained." 

Block booking is held to be directly 
responsible for evils which have led to 
"popular revolt," the report asserted 
in that section devoted to the film in- 
dustry. 

The boycott provisions of the code 
have been turned against the very in- 
terests which conceived them, as a re- 
sult of the continued effort of the large 
producers to thrust upon the public a 
type of picture which it will not accept. 

"The board feels called upon to ad- 
vert again to the so-called code of 
fair competition for the motion picture 
industry and renew its recommenda- 
tions in reference thereto," the Presi- 
dent was told. 

Criticizing the National Recovery 
Administration for its failure to take 
action upon the recommendations orig- 
inally made, the board, in a summary 
of recommendations, demanded that 
the government take steps to remedy 
"great and unendurable public ills" in- 
stead of leaving it to the citizens of 
the country to act. 

"In the first report, this board de- 
scribed the lawless and outrageous 
excesses of the monopoly in this in- 
dustry and demanded that something 
be done to protect the small enterprise 
exposed to the insatiable rapacity of 
the powerful," it was pointed out. 

Want New Authority 

"We suggest that the remedies for 
great and unendurable ills of this 
nature ought not to be left to public 
action when the government is equip- 
ped with ample power to correct them. 
And the first means toward correction 
in this case would be the abrupt dis- 



missal of the present code authority 
and the choice of another that can 
conceive something of the rights of 
the public and has some other impulse 
than the extraction of fat profits. 

"The board feels called upon to ad- 
vert again to the so-called code of 
fair competition for the motion picture 
industry and to renew its recommen- 
dations in reference thereto. 

"Our former report on this code 
demonstrated not only its monopolistic 
and oppressive character, but also in- 
dicated that in its negotiations and 
writings by the deputy administrator 
complete frankness and impartiality 
were lacking. 

"The board made definite findings 
that the code was not warranted by 
and was contrary to the provisions of 
the National Industrial Recovery Act, 
inasmuch as it authorized practices 
which have been specifically condemn- 
ed by the courts of this land as monop- 
olistic and oppressive. 

"Numerous instances have come to 
the attention of this board where prac- 
tices have arisen or are continued 
under the operation of the so-called 
code of fair competition, although 
these practices have been determined 
to be monopolistic and oppressive by 
decisions of the U. S. Supreme Court 
and other courts of the land. In addi- 
tion, cases have been noted where 
parties have been restrained at hear- 
ings held before the National Recov- 
ery Administration from citing these 
decisions. 

"Thus, pursuant to the authority 
granted them in the motion picture 
code, the producer-dominated griev- 
ance boards are directing a boycott 
against independent exhibitors who 
deviate from the admission prices 
established by the producers. The re- 
sult of this boycott is to force the 
exhibitors to comply with price regu- 
lations of the producers or close their 
theatres for lack of pictures. So we 
have the producers resorting to a boy- 
cott which has been judicially estab- 
lished to be illegal and monopolistic. 
(Paramount vs. U. S. 282 U. S. 30 
and U. S. vs. First National, 282 
U. S. 44.) 

Say Decision Disregarded 

"The first instance of the disregard 
of the court decisions by the operation 
of the motion picture code is presented 
by the actions of the subservient clear- 
ance and zoning boards in formulating 
clearance and zoning schedules in 
various cities which put the low ad- 
mission independent theaters so far 
behind the producer-owned theatres 
that they will not be able to supply 
their patrons with pictures of current 
interest and will lose them to the pro- 
ducer-owned houses. This device was 
attempted before the code, but was 
halted by the decision in Youngclaus 
vs. Omaha Film Board of Trade, et al. 

"Heretofore the big eight producers 
have made little use of the extra- 
ordinary powers conferred upon them 
under the motion picture code. They 
have been afraid to exercise their 
powers in the face of the public at- 
tack upon the code contained in the 
board's report. The failure of the 
National Recovery Administration to 
carry out the suggestions of the board 
encouraged the Big Eight to try out 
their powers upon their helpless rivals. 

"More important from the stand- 
point of the public at large are the 
evil consequences resulting from the 
failure to act on the recommendation 
of this board that steps be taken to 
correct the practice known as compul- 
sory block booking. The abolition of 
that practice is necessary to give the 



exhibitors and their patrons a right 
of selection as to the pictures to be 
shown in the theatres. As matters 
stand under the code, the power of 
the producers to compel exhibitors to 
buy and show all of their pictures — 
the good with the bad — and to desig- 
nate the days of the week upon which 
particular pictures shall be shown has 
the sanction of the National Recovery 
Administration. 

"Millions of outraged citizens, find- 
ing that the code affords no means of 
escaping the forced showing of pic- 
tures, have joined under the leadership 
of various religious bodies in putting 
into effect a nationwide boycott di- 
rected against objectionable pictures. 
Thus, boycotting, sanctioned through- 
out the National Recovery Adminis- 
tration activities, becomes a national 
institution and is now employed by 
the public at large to compel the re- 
forms which the National Recovery 
Administration has forced the public 
to an expedient which, although ef- 
fective, will surely result in grave 
hardship for the independent exhibi- 
tors who are in no way the cause of 
the evil sought to be remedied. The 
only way to prevent this injustice and 
attain the result which the entire na- 
tion is seeking by this boycott is to 
adopt the changes advised by this 
board in its original report on the 
motion picture code." 



St. Louis Case Up July 5 

St. Louis, July 2. — Hearing on the 
involuntary debtor's action brought by 
Vitagraph, Inc., against the St. Louis 
Properties Corp. in its effort to pre- 
vent a foreclosure sale on the Ambas- 
sador, Grand Central and Missouri 
theatres will be held July 5 before 
Federal Judge Charles B. Davis. 



"Star" Urges That 
Films Be Kept Clean 

(Continued from pane 1) 

oppose political censorship or Federal 
regulation. 

Declaring that "many of the indus- 
try's present embarrassments are 
traceable to itself" and that the cur- 
rent reaction is a natural consequence 
of a period of liberty mistaken for 
license by the producers, the Star con- 
tinues : 

"The problem, of course, is to de- 
vise some method by which the screen 
shall be cleaned up enough to provide 
the average man and woman with de- 
cent, inoffensive entertainment with- 
out becoming so shackled that it shall 
cease to exist as a means for the art- 
istic expression of new and forceful 
ideas. . . . There is considerable dan- 
ger of the reaction going so far as 
to bring about a narrow censorship 
that would later be obnoxious to the 
American public. 

"The fundamental difficulty seems to 
lie in the fact that the movies never 
have clearly understood their double 
purpose. . . . Their first and most 
important function is to supply cheap 
and wholesome entertainment. There- 
fore, three-fourths of their product 
probably should waive artistic consid- 
erations and apply itself to the job 
of being entertaining and keeping itself 
clean. Parents should feel that their 
children can go to the general picture 
show without endangering their morals. 

"There is a place for the other 
fourth that can deal freely and artist- 
ically with life. But such films, in- 
tended for mature minds, should be so 
labeled. If the theatres refuse to ac- 
cept this responsibility, they will in- 
vite legislative action that will take 
the matter out of their hands." 



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DAILY 



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VOL. 36. NO. 3 



NEW YORK, THURSDAY, JULY 5, 1934 



TEN CENTS 



Columbia to 
Push Hard on 
10 Specials 

Campaign for Preferred 
Time Based on These 



By RED KANN 

Atlantic City, July 4. — Colum- 
bia's place in the sun next season re- 
volves around 10 pictures on which 
its campaign for preferred playing 
time is based. They will be known as 
"extended run specials" and will be 
backed by all the advertising and ex- 
ploitation resources Columbia can 
muster. 

Heading the group are two Frank 
Capras, of which "Broadway Bill," the 
first, is practically finished. It is based 
on Mark Hellinger's "Strictly Confi- 
dential," and includes among its fea- 
tured players Warner Baxter, Myrna 

(Continued on page 4) 



Production Slows 
Under New Policy 

Hollywood, July 4. — Production ac- 
tivity, due to slower and more careful 
preparation, pictures to conform with 
present demand for clean pictures, con- 
tinues on the decline with only 33 fea- 
tures and seven shorts in actual pro- 
duction as against 35 features and 11 
shorts the preceding week. 

There is little hope for an immedi- 
ate increase, as there are only 19 fea- 
tures and 12 shorts in the final stages 
(Continued on page 19) 



Madison Houses Ask 
License Fees Slash 

Madison, Wis., July 4. — A petition 
of local theatre operators asking a 
reduction in the theatre license has 
been referred to the Common Council's 
license committee for consideration. 

In their communication to the coun- 
cil the managers claimed the ordinance 
was passed when the theatres were 
enjoying good business. Under the 
present ordinance, theatres are licensed 
according to seating capacity with the 
larger houses paying a fee of approxi- 
mately $300. 



French Regulations 
Continued to Dec. 1 

Washington, July 4.— Regulations 
governing exhibition of foreign films 
in France are continued, with certain 
modifications, for six months, until 

(Continued on page 4) 



Fox Met. Deal 
AgainDelayed 
After Hearing 

Holders Want to Dispose 
Of Bonds, Not Leases 

Some of the points over which 
Loew's and Warners' attorneys have 
been haggling the past few weeks 
with the sub-committee of the Fox 
Metropolitan bondholders' committee 
were revealed at the Federal Court 
hearing Tuesday before Judge Julian 
W. Mack at which a further post- 
ponement was taken until tomorrow 
afternoon. 

William L. Bainton, of counsel for 
the bondholders' committee, told the 
court that his clients were determined 
to sell only their $11,000,000 of de- 
posited Fox Met bonds, and these at 

(Continued on page 19) 



Code Assent Order 
Officially Signed 

Division Administrator Sol A. 
Rosenblatt officially signed an order 
Tuesday for reopening of code as- 
sents. New forms are being mailed 
bv Campi to all code board secretaries 
thi s week with deadline for returning 
assents Aug. 15. Two code signers 
must endorse the new compliances. 

Public hearings on producer and 
distributor allocations and other code 
amendments are expected to be set by 
Rosenblatt within the next two weeks. 

W. C. Michel, Ed McEvoy and J. 
Louis Geller comprise the second 
appeal committee which sits today to 
hear a number of cases. 



ITOA Loses Move to 
Go Into State Court 

_ I.T.O.A.'s motion to remand its ac- 
tion against Code Authority back to 
the state Supreme Court was denied 
by Federal Judge Henry Goddard 
Tuesday. 

In the event I.T.O.A. now does not 

(Continued on page 19) 



Not Affected 

New Orleans, July 4. — A 
second canvass of exhibitors 
and exchange men shows the 
campaign of the League of 
Decency has, as yet, left no 
ill effects on box-offices. 
Grosses are down, but this is 
attributed to the extreme 
warm weather, night clubs, 
bathing beaches and beer 
gardens. 



Mundus List 
Will Include 
25 Foreigns 



Mundus Distributing Corp. will re- 
lease 25 foreign films in the United 
States, the product being produced 
abroad by Herbert Wilcox, British & 
Dominions and London Films. 

First release will be "Cash," a B. 
& D. picture. Sales policy on Mundus 
films will be individual contracts with 
United Artists handling physical dis- 
tribution. No date has yet been set 
for general release. The second pic- 
ture has not been decided. 

According to the sales plan, special 
Mundus sales representatives will be 
named and they will work under Earle 
Kramer, whose headquarters are in 
New York. 



U. A. in Good Shape 
On Films — Lichtman 

United Artists is better off as far as 
product is concerned than it has ever 
been this early in the season, asserts 
Al Lichtman, vice-president and gen- 
eral manager. 

"For the new season," he says, 
"our organization has four produc- 
tions completed and awaiting release, 
three in work and nearing completion 
and one now before the cameras." 

When Darryl Zanuck, vice-presi- 
dent in charge of production, returns 
in August, Lichtman says he will start 

(Continued on page 19) 



Girls Too Aggressive in 
Film Love, NEA Is Told 



Washington, July 4. — National 
studies have shown films to be above 
general moral standards with respect 
to democracy and the treatment of 
children by parents, almost parallel in 



respect to kissing, but in marked con- 
flict in respect to aggressiveness of a 
girl in lovemaking, members of the 
National Education Ass'n were told 
(.Continued on paae 2) 



Stanley Will 
Close 75 in 
Philadelphia 

Movement May Spread 
Due to Church Boycott 



Philadelphia, July 4. — Stanley- 
Warner yesterday gave two-weeks 
notices to employes in 75 theatres in 
Philadelphia. 

This is said to be part of a general 
movement for closing until the Cath- 
olic boycott is modified. 

Speaking for independents in the 
M.P.T.O., Lewen Pizor said the ac- 
tion would be followed, and Dave 
Barrist, spokesman for the new I.E. 
P. A., said its membership would fol- 
low suit if the closings show signs of 
becoming general. 

In a statement for Stanley-Warner, 
Leonard Schlessinger said he under- 
stood this territory was the only one 
where the church ban was aimed at 

(Continued on page 4) 



Myers Asks Delay 
On All New Buying 

Cautioning exhibitors not to buy 
new season product in a hurry, Abram 
F. Myers, general counsel for Allied, 
on Tuesday advised the New Jersey 
unit to study announcements from 
every company and match results of 

(Continued on page 4) 



W anger's Plans Are 
Not Set, He States 

Walter Wanger's independent pro- 
duction plans are not yet set, he de- 
clared on his return Tuesday from a 
five weeks' European trip. 

"Things look good in Europe," 
Wanger commented. "There's plenty 
of activity there. Every Hollywood 
producer should make the trip, there's 
no question about that." 

Wanger leaves for the coast this 
week-end. 



Equipment Firms Go 
On a C.O.D. Basis 

Local theatre equipment supply 
dealers are planning to put all ac- 
counts on a C.O.D. basis as a result 
of large losses sustained by dealers 
with the bankruptcy of Manhattan 
Playhouses. 

One dealer alone is said to have lost 
$11,000 on the account and other men 
are also said to have dropped sizable 
amounts. 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Thursday, July 5, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



(Registered U. S. Patent Office) 



Vol. 36 



July 5, 1934 



No. 3 




Martin Quigley 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 
MAURICE KANN 
Editor 



JAMES A. CRON 
Advertising Manager JT»31.» 



Published daily except Sunday and holi- 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub- 
sidiary of Quigley Publications, Inc., 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 1790 Broadway, New 
York. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Cable ad- 
dress "Quigpubco, New York." All con- 
tents copyrighted 1934 by Motion Picture 
Daily, Inc. Address all correspondence to 
the New York Office. Other Quigley pub- 
lications: MOTION PICTURE HERALD, 
BETTER THEATRES, THE MOTION 
PICTURE ALMANAC and THE CHI- 
CAGOAN. 

Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Life 
Building, Vine and Yucca Streets, Victor 
M. Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 407 
South Dearborn Street, Edwin S. Clif- 
ford, manager; London Bureau: Remo 
House, 310 Regent St., London, W. 1, 
Bruce Allan, Representative. Cable address: 
"Quigpubco, London"; Berlin Bureau: 
Berlin - Tempelhof , Kaiserin - Augustastrasse 
28, Joachim K. Rutenberg , Representative; 
Paris Bureau: 19, Rue de la Cour des- 
Noues, Pierre Autre, Representative; Rome 
Bureau: Viale Gorizia, Vittorio Malpassuti, 
Representative; Sydney Bureau: 102 Sus- 
sex Street, Cliff Holt, Representative; Mex- 
ico City Bureau: Apartado 269, James 
Lockhart, Representative; Glasgow Bureau: 
86 Dundrennan Road, G. Holmes, Repre- 
sentative; Budapest Bureau: 11 Olasz 
Fasor 17, Endre Hevesi, Representative. 

Entered as second class matter January 
4, 1926 at the Post Office at New York 
City, N. Y., under Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada $15 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 



West Film Not Banned 

Columbus, July 4. — Published re- 
ix)rts emanating from here that Mae 
West's new picture, formerly titled 
"It Ain't No Sin," had been banned 
by the Ohio censor board have been 
denied by Dr. B. O. Skinner, head of 
the board. 

"The Mae West picture was never 
presented to the censor board of 
Ohio," Dr. Skinner wired John Ham- 
mel at the Paramount home office. 



Para. Regional Here 

Last of the four Paramount re- 
gionals starts today and continues 
until tomorrow at the Waldorf As- 
toria. Sales policy and discussion of 
various details in connection with the 
new product will highlight the meet- 
ing. George J. Schaefer, Joseph J. 
Unger and Milt Kusell will attend. 



Cinecolor Buys Process 

Demetre Deponte of Cinecolor, Ltd., 
has purchased the rights to use the 
Peerless film process in England, 
France, Italy, Belgium and their pos- 
sessions. 



Remodel 40 Theatres 

Continental Theatre Accessories 
has just completed remodeling 40 
RKO theatres, according to Joseph 
Hornstein, president of Continental. 



"U," DuWorld in Deal 

Universal has acquired from Du 
World Pictures the foreign distribu- 
tion rights to the Jimmy Savo pic- 
ture, "Girl in the Case." 



Girls Too Aggressive in 
Film Love, NEA Is Told 



(.Continued from page 1) 

last night by Robert P. Wray of 
Pennsylvania State College. 

"Aggressiveness of a girl in love- 
making is the phase of morality in 
which pictures most often conflict with 
present standards," Dr. Wray de- 
clared. "It seems evident that pictures 
are opposing present standards of 
value in respect to aggressiveness of a 
girl in lovemaking." 

The study was based on a large 
number of separate scenes, submitted 
to groups in all classes of life and em- 
ployment. 

"Conduct in the movies in respect to 
kissing and caressing almost precisely 
parallels life," is was found, while 
"pictures stand rather above the 
morals in respect to democratic atti- 
tudes and practices" and "the phase of 
our study dealing with the treatment 
of children by parents finds the movies 
at their best." 



Kennedy Made Head 
Of Securities Board 

Washington, July 4. — Following 
reported opposition to his election to 
the chairmanship of the Securities and 
Exchange Commission by Ferdinand 
Pecora, Joseph P. Kennedy, former 
head of Pathe, has been unanimously 
named to the post. Kennedy was 
President Roosevelt's choice for the 
job. 

The chairmanship of the commission 
had been sought by Pecora. The ap- 
pointment of Kennedy was made at 
the initial meeting of the commission, 
all the members of which, with the 
exception of Pecora, readily bowed to 
the President's wishes that Kennedy 
be elected. 



Cantor to Start Soon 

Hollywood, July 4. — Eddie Cantor 
will start his fifth musical for Samuel 
Goldwyn in a few days. It will be 
called "Kid Millions." Roy Del Ruth 
will direct. 



Milwaukee House Dark 

Milwaltkee, July 4. — The Alham- 
bra, local first run operated by Fred 
S. Meyer and managed by Stan 
Meyer, has closed for an indefinite 
period. 



Loew Kansas City 
House Tries Duals 

Kansas City, July 4. — While Loew 
has agreed to throw duals overboard 
in Cleveland, the circuit inaugurates 
the policy in Kansas City Friday when 
the Midland, 4,000-seat downtown first 
run, opens with its first bill of more 
than one feature. "Laughing Boy" and 
"Lazy River" are scheduled for the 
opener. 

The move is reported to be intended 
to hasten an agreement on the part of 
the independent suburbans to restrict 
duals to one a week and eliminate 10- 
cent admissions, which Loew and other 
affiliated circuits demand in exchange 
for higher first run admissions. Should 
the suburbans adopt the agreement, the 
first runs also promise to stick to sin- 
gle features. 

Whether this latest development 
will have the desired effect is specu- 
lative, as the few independents oppos- 
ing the agreement anticipate that the 
first runs will raise admissions and 
discard duals beginning with the new 
season, regardless of anything the sub- 
urbans agree to. On top of that, it is 
generally believed Loew will not ex- 
tend its double bills beyond the one 
week. 

Addition of Loew to the double fea- 
ture ranks finds only one first run in 
Kansas City, the suburban Fox Up- 
town, on a steady single feature policy. 



Duals Are Discussed 
ByDelawarelMPTOA 

Harrington, Del., July 4. — The 
double feature problem was discussed 
and a "luke warm" stand against poor 
pictures was taken at the monthly 
meeting of the Independent M. P. T. 
O. A. of Delaware and the Eastern 
Shore of Maryland here. Action on 
the double feature problem is still 
pending. 

A committee of three, comprising A. 
J. Blair of the Rialto and A. B. Selig- 
man of the Strand of Wilmington and 
Bryan Dashiell of Cambridge, Md., 
was appointed to draft a letter to 
exhibitors in the form of a formal re- 
quest for cleaner pictures. 



Fox Off 7 /s on Big Board 



Net 
Change 



+ v$ 

- % 

+ 54 

+ 54 



+ 54 



High Low Close 

Columbia Pictures, vtc 28 28 28 

Consolidated Film Industries 354 354 3 J A 

Eastman Kodak 96}4 9644 96H 

Fox Film "A" 1354 1Z& 1254 

Loew's, Inc 2854 2854 

Paramount Publix, cts 354 354 3$4 

Pathe Exchange 2 2 2 

Pathe Exchange "A" 2054 1954 2054 

RKO 254 254 2A 

Warner Bros 5J4 5 5*4 

Sentry Down 1-16 on Curb 

Net 

High Low Close Change 

Sentry Safety Control 3/16 3/16 3/16 — 1/16 

Technicolor 1354 1354 1356 

Trans Lux 154 154 154 



Sales 

100 
100 
300 
500 

2,100 
700 
500 

1,000 
500 

1.900 



Sales 

100 
200 
100 



Loew Bonds Rise x /2 



Keith B. F. 6s '46 

Loew's 6s '41, ww deb rights 

Paramount Broadway 554s '51 

Paramount Publix 554s '50 

Pathe 7s '37, ww 

Warner Bros. 6s '39, wd 54J4 









Net 




High 

69 


Low 


Close 


Change 


Sales 


69 


69 




15 


10054 


10054 


10054 


+ ^ 


12 


42 


4154 


42 




3 


5054 


5054 


5054 


+ 54 


2 


9954 


99 


99 


- 54 


6 


5444 


5354 


5454 


+ 54 


26 



i Purely 
Personal ► 

HARRY EGERT of Progressive 
Poster Service is vacationing at 
Pine Hill. Louis Weinzim.mf.r. 
Egert's partner, leaves Saturday for 
the Adirondacks for a three-week fish- 
ing trip. 

Georgio Martinez Sierra, Span- 
ish playwright under contract to Fox, 
and Catalena Barcena, Spanish star, 
also with Fox, arrived yesterday on 
the Conte di Savoia. 

F. F. Proctor, founder of the Proc- 
tor circuit, and Mrs. Proctor, accom- 
panied by three nieces, sailed last night 
on the Rotterdam for a North Cape 
cruise. 

Walter Ryan has been named De- 
troit representative of the American 
Federation of Actors by Ralph 
Whitehead, executive secretary. 

Arthur Loew, Sam Morris, Joe 
Lee, Harry Buxbaum, Phil Hodes 
and Jack Ellis were among Sardi 
lunchers on Tuesday. 

M. Puason, operator of the Fox 
and Metropolitan theatres in the 
Philippine Islands, is here for a short 
stay. 

Alexander Snekler, general man- 
ager for Universal in Brazil, arrived 
yesterday on the Pan America. 

Lou Metzger left for the coast 
yesterday by plane and will be back 
in a few weeks. 

Harold Rodner is at Saranac Lake 
NVA Camp working out new pro- 
grams. 

Homer Croy's "Madame Tubbs" 
has been bought by Universal. 

Gradwell Sears returns from the 
coast tomorrow. 

S. R. Kent returned Tuesday from 
Chicago. 

Moe Streimer is in Saratoga on 
business. 



Montevideo Has 58 

Washington, July 4. — During Jan- 
uary, 1934, there were 58 picture shows 
operating in the city of Montevideo. 
Uruguay, which gave 1,796 shows at- 
tended by 108,978 persons, according to 
the monthly bulletin of the Munici- 
pality of Montevideo, as reported to 
the U. S. Department of Commerce by 
Assistant Jule B. Smith at Buenos 
Aires. 



May Garner $95,000 

Chalking up a gross of $70,000 for 
the first five days. "Of Human Bond- 
age" will hit a new high for the last 
six months, according to RKO. An- 
ticipated intake for Tuesday was $10,- 
000 and for yesterday a take of 
S15.000 was expected. It is being held 
over at the Music Hall. 



Brandts Add Four More 

Brandt Brothers have added four 
houses to their circuit within the last 
week, making a new total of 28. Be- 
cause the contracts have not yet been 
signed, the new acquisitions will not 
be named. 



Reissue for "Cimarron" 

"Cimarron" is being reissued by 
RKO and numerous bookings already 
have been set throughout the country. 
Repeat runs are also being clocked on 
"Flying Down to Rio." 



THE FLEET'S IN 



HERE 

THE 



and so a«" e 
JAMES CAGNEY 

PAT O'BRIEN 
G LO RIA 






MO HON PICTURE 

DAILY 



Ritzing It with Columbia 



4 



Columbia to 
Push Hard on 
10 Specials 



{.Continued from page 1) 

Loy, Raymond Walburn, Lynn Over- 
man, Clarence Muse and Sterling 
Halloway. Robert Riskin, who 
adapted "Lady for a Day" and "It 
Happened One Night," did the script. 

Others are "Carnival," also by Ris- 
kin, but with no production details as 
yet; "Feather in Her Hat," a best 
seller by I. A. R. Wylie, which ran 
serially in the Delineator; "Party 
Wire," another best seller by Bruce 
Manning; a Claudette Colbert special 
and an Edward G. Robinson vehicle, 
with Howard Hawks directing the 
latter ; "Girl Friend," a musical ex- 
travaganza by Herbert Fields, Richard 
Rodgers and Lorenz Hart, in which 
jack Haley and Lupe Velez are to be 
featured. William Rowland will pro- 
duce. The other two will be "Mills of 
the Gods," described as a powerful 
drama by Melville Baker and Jack 
Kirkland, and "One Night of Love." 
the musical starring Grace Moore, 
which has been directed by Victor 
Schertzinger. 

The remaining 38 on the schedule 
will be known and sold as the A-l 
group, but it is on the 10 that Colum- 
bia will do its splurging and spread 
its negative budget. 

Indicative of the strides made by 
the company is the unimpeachable re- 
port that Columbia has already sold 
more contracts for next season sight 
unseen than were landed in the first 
eight weeks of the opening of the na- 
tional sales drive during the season 
about to close. 

Decentralization to Continue 

Decentralization of Columbia's 31 
exchanges, begun about a year ago, 
will continue into the next on the 
theory that branch managers know 
their own territory best and likewise 
the salesmen under them. Colum- 
bia will be largely content to accept 
deals set up in the field. While it is 
true the home office often turns back 
contracts and insists the terms must 
be improved, the general practice is 
to accept the judgment of the men in 
the field. For this reason it is under- 
stood percentage pictures have not 
been designated, nor have terms been 
set up on fixed bases to which the 
field force must adhere without vari- 
ance. 

Tuesday marked the close of the 
eastern convention, while Wednesday 
saw individual meetings between home 
office executives, district managers and 
salesmen. The second day saw a 
breakdown of product by Jack Cohn 
and Abe Montague, with a discus- 
sion of advertising and exploitation 
plans by George Brown. In the 
afternoon Rube Jackter, Montague's 
assistant, spoke on the preparation of 
contracts _ and J. W. MacFarland 
short subject sales supervisor, on his 
end of the new program. 

Joe McConville, national sales su- 
pervisor, discussed his theory of what 
constituted a proper film deal. Cohn 
also spoke and gave credit for the 
company's progress to the field force. 

A surprise development, to which 
Montague reacted accordingly, was the 
presentation of a parchment scroll car- 
rying the name of every member of 
the 16 exchanges represented at this 



Atlantic City, July 4. — F. Lynn 
Stocker, manager of the Oklahoma 
City branch, declared he would have 
felt more at home in Atlantic City if 
someone had had the thoughtfulness 
to erect a few thousand oil well rigs. 
According to Stocker, the sight of 
nothing but buildings becomes monoto- 
nous after a while. 

• 

When someone suggested to H. 
"Duke" Duvall, New Orleans man- 
ager, that he go down to Hackney's 
for some sea food, that citizen of the 
Delta community flatly rejected the 
proposal on the grounds that there 
was nothing in the line of fish he 
couldn't get just as good, if not better, 
in his home town. When asked what 
he could get up north that would be 
different, his immediate reply was, 
"Give me a double order of snow and 
sleet." 

• 

Jack Underwood, Dallas manager, 
disagreed with Duvall. He likes 
Atlantic City because it has neither 
"northers" nor "dust storms." 

• 

Tim O'Toole, Boston manager, took 
one look at Joe Miller, skipper of 



meeting. He left Wednesday for New 
York, as did other home office execu- 
tives. 

The group leaves for Chicago Fri- 
day, where the western meeting starts 
Monday, to terminate Thursday. Dis- 
trict managers, branch managers and 
salesmen representing 15 exchanges 
will attend, with practically all dele- 
gates arriving Saturday, with an op- 
portunity thereby to take in the 
World's Fair prior to the convention 
advent. Tuesday night the eastern 
convention switched from the Ritz- 
Carlton to Hackney's, where an infor- 
mal get-together dinner marked the 
formal termination of the sales pow- 
wow. 



Columbia to Rebuild 
Its Studio on Coast 

Atlantic City, July 4. — Columbia's 
studio facilities are to be practically 
rebuilt on an earthquake-proof basis, 
delegates to the sales convention were 
told here today. The work has al- 
ready been started, it was stated. 

First of these is a two-story writ- 
ers' building. The next new unit will 
be a 50x150 structure for the electri- 
cal, paint, special effects, inserts and 
trailer departments. It will be of 
steel and concrete construction. A 
seven-story structure will be put up on 
adjoining Beechwood Drive property 
for the casting, production and art 
departments, the research library, still- 
photo department, wardrobe, make-up 
and property departments. A fourth 
unit planned is an 11-story adminis- 
tration building with a three-story of- 
fice building and two new double 
stages. 

A two-story addition to the labora- 
tory is nearing completion. Cost of 
the new work is estimated at $350,000. 

Pre-Convention Drive 
Winners Are Announced 

Atlantic City, July 4. — Names of 
winners of the pre-convention contest 
to clean up all business for the 
past year were announced at the see- 



the Buffalo branch, as he got off the 
train and said, "Gosh, did you strip 
for bathing while traveling?" Where- 
upon Miller immediately removed 
this impression of nakedness by put- 
ting his hat on. 

• 

Jim Rogers, Memphis manager, has 
but one objection against conventions 
held in Atlantic City. This city is too 
far from Beale St. 

• 

Bob Ingram. Charlotte manager, 
believes something should be done 
about so-called "free" exhibits on the 
boardwalk. Wandering into a wax 
exhibit, he made the discovery that 
the usual process had been reversed. 
While no admission fee was charged, 
there was an exit fee. Because the in- 
dividual supervising the collection box 
was a comely female, he found him- 
self paying about four times as much 
as the show was worth before he 
could get out. 

• 

Whenever Hal Bissell, Cleveland 
manager, hits the Atlantic seaboard 
he loads up on sea food just to make 
sure that he does not develop a lack 
of iodine. 



ond day's session of the Columbia sales 
meet here. Phil D. Fox, Boston, 
headed the list. 

Others were : Second, William 
Bradfield, Kansas City ; third, Murray 
Briskin, Buffalo ; fourth, Max Gillis, 
Philadelphia; fifth, L". T. Koch, At- 
lanta. 

Winners of branch prizes were : 
First, Portland, Ore., J. R. Beale, 
manager ; second, Chicago, Phil 
Dunas, manager ; third, Boston, T. F. 
O'Toole, manager ; fourth, Charlotte, 
R. J. Ingram, manager ; fifth, Mem- 
phis, J. J. Rogers, manager. 

The announcements were made by 
Abe Montague, general sales mana- 
ger. 

Company plans for increasing the 
advertising budget for next year were 
discussed by George Brown, director 
of public relations. Nate Spingold 
gave a talk on the campaign book. 

To Survey Production 
In Britain for Col. 

Hollywood, July 4. — Harry Cohn 
is dispatching Sid Rogell to London 
within a fortnight to make a survey 
of the possibilities of producing a 
series of pictures there for Columbia 
with a view to cashing in on English 
talent. 



Drop "Mud Turtle" Title 

Hollywood. July 4. — Title of Co- 
lumbia's "Mud Turtle," being pre- 
nared for Jack Holt, has been changed 
to "The Depths Below." 



Columbia Signs Haley 

Hollywood, July 4. — Columbia 
has signed Jack Haley for the male 
lead in "The Girl Friend." starring 
Lupe Velez. 



Jack Fier with Mascot 

Hollywood, July 4. — Jack Fier, for- 
merly with Consolidated Laboratories, 
has succeeded Maurice Conn as assist- 
ant to Nat Levine. head of Mascot 
Pictures. 



Thursday, July 5, 1934 



Stanley Will 
Close 75 in 
Philadelphia 



{Continued from page 1) 

theatres rather than specific pictures. 
He said he had no objection to a black 
and white list for films. 

Pizor said exhibitors did not want 
to run pictures offensive to anyone. 

Stanley- Warner closes the Boyd and 
Victoria Saturday and several neigh- 
borhoods are to follow next week. 



Joseph Bernhard, operating head of 
Warner theatres, said Tuesday that 
"nothing had been decided" in connec- 
tion with the Philadelphia situation. 



Myers Asks Delay 
On All New Buying 

{Continued from page 1) 

the current season with last before de- 
ciding what pictures to purchase. 

He also talked on the church boy- 
cott, which, Myers claimed, was hurt- 
ing business. 

He stated he "hopes producers will 
clean house" and eliminate objection- 
able pictures. Myers did not bring up 
the trailer situation. 

Due to illness of Sidney Samuelson, 
president, Julius Charnow acted as 
chairman. Myers was supposed to con- 
fer with Samuelson on Allied prob- 
lems, but with Samuelson absent, 
Myers flew back to Washington be- 
fore the session ended. 

The next New Jersey meeting is 
set for Asbury Park, July 17. 

French Regulations 
Continued to Dec. 1 

{Continued from page 1) 

Dec. 1, 1934, by a decree published 
in the French Journal Official, accord- 
ing to Acting Commercial Attache 
Daniel J. Reagan of the Department 
of Commerce, stationed in Paris. 

The decree provides that dubbed 
films of foreign origin may be given 
public showings in France only within 
the limit of 94 films during the six 
months ending Dec. 31, 1934, as against 
70 films from July 1, 1933, to June 
30, 1934. 

Original films in foreign languages 
may be shown in not more than five 
theatres in the Paris area (Seine De- 
partment), as during the past year, 
and in not more than two theatres in 
each of the other departments of 
France, as against 10 theatres for all 
the other departments combined dur- 
ing the past year. This restriction will 
not apply to animated cartoons during 
the next six months. 



Get Three, After Five 

Negotiations by Warners are under- 
stood practically completed whereby 
the circuit takes the Ritz, Lyndhurst ; 
Rahway, Rahway ; Playhouse, Dover ; 
Rex, Irvington ; Lincoln, Arlington, 
all in New Jersey. B ratter & Pol- 
lack own the houses. 

Warners recently took the Bellevue, 
Upper Montclair ; Broadmore, Bloom- 
field: Park, Caldwell, from Rapf & 
Rudin. 



DART 




PAR A MOUNT'S Q/ue^cCt^t 




■3mL — ik— — l_ 





ASO 



"5e 



■ 




JULY ... 6 pictures, starting with the year's greatest money attraction, 
Mae West in "It Ain't No Sin/' and a great musical/'Shoot the Works' 7 




Al N'T A, 



Goe s 



° 9e ' Pry 



rial 



trur )ks ^ new "l 




WTth CARY GRANT 
GENEVIEVE TOBIN 

Helen Mack, Edward Everett 
Horton and the Wampas Baby 

Stars of 1934 
Directed by Harlan Thompson 
Associate Director, Jean Negulesco 

aB P SCHULBERG production 



IlililVlJult 




Gertrude Michael 
Paul Cavanagh 
Alison Skipworth 

Directed by Ralph Murphy 



if it's 



a 



PARAMOUNT PICTURE it's the best show in town! 





LADIES „ 
SHOULD LISTEN 




BING CROSBY 
MIRIAM HOPKINS 

She Loves Me A/of" 

with 

Kitty Carlisle - Directed by Elliott Nugent 

Biggest Broadway smash in years! 250 consecutive per- 
formances in New York to S. R. O. business. Millions of 
Saturday Evening Post readers followed it serially for weeks. 
Music by two champion song-writing combinations— Gordon 
and Revel and Rainger and Robin. A host af hits, headed 
by "Love in Bloom," "Straight From the Shoulder, Right 
From the Heart." Kitty Carlisle singing love duets with. 
Bing Crosby. Miriam Hopkins in a sensational new role 




J J 



YOU BELONG 
TO Nfc 



1 1 



with 

Lee Tracy 
Helen Mack 
Helen Morgan 

Directed by 
Alfred L Werker 

director of t 
.■the House of Ro.hsch.ld J*^ 



yJ 



AUGUST 



. 5 "ace" film entertainments, including a Dietrich production, a 
Bing Crosby-Miriam Hopkins comedy with music, and a picture 
with Gary Cooper, Carole Lombard and Shirley Temple. 




GARY COOPE R 
CAROLE LOMBARD 
SHIRLEY TEMPLE 



ow an 



j 




orever 



with 

Sir Guy Standing • Charlotte Granville 
Directed by Henry Hathaway 

Two of the biggest box office names in the 
business and the littlest BIG name in motion 
pictures today in a film entertainment jammed 
with romance, heart throbs and excitement. 



f it's a PARAMOUNT PICTURE it's the best show in town! 





SEPTEMBER .5 more outstanding attractions, headed by 
Cecil B. DeMille's "Cleopatra", the biggest box office bet of the year, 
and "Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch," a sure-fire success. 




love affair lhaf shook the world, tet in o spectacle of thrilling magnificence! 

Directed by Cecil B. DeMille with 

CLAUDETTE COLBERT 
WARREN WILLIAM 
HENRY WILCOXON 

Ian K.iih • Jouph Schlldkraul • C. Aubrey Smith • Gcrtrud* Mlcha.l 

This picture promises to be the biggest grosser of the year, 
and perhaps, of all time. Mode as only Cecil B. DeMille 
could make it, it is one of the most stupendous and exciting 
productions ever seen on the screen. 8000 players and 
two acres of stupendous sets form the background for 
the magnificent love story of Antony and Cleopatra. 







'Mo 

oro,,^*.. . e 5 fom«... 



">« Plays 9 ° od will for '"build b oth 
' Mrs - Wia fh eo rre 

° f Lilians. 




■ M 

m: 




v ' Til 




^ D V 




4 




College Rhythm 

with 

Joe Penner • Lanny Ross • Richard Arlen 
Ida Lupino • Lyda Roberti 

Directed by Norman Taurog 

Right at the time when football hysteria grips the 
nation and people start going places and doing 
things, Paramount will release the topper to 'Col- 
lege Humor," a football musical,' College Rhythm. 
With Joe Penner, the No. 1 comedy attraction on 
the air today; Lanny Ross and a great cast of play- 
ers . . .The action will be set to music by the great 
Paramount song-writing team, Gordon and Revel. 



"D . * 



R »99U S of R e J G . 

°° ^ screen tod ^ ° f th * ou L 'h f ° r 



)BER ...The BIG Month... The Harvest Month for Paramount 
box offices, with four sure-fire successes in "College Rhythm/ 7 
"Limehouse Nights/ 7 "Ruggles of Red Gap" and "Pursuit of Happiness." 





— y, °^°°> ^SL^.W 



One of the most 
popular plays in 
New York this year 





All about those good old days when we 
proudly stressed in the Constitution of the 
United States the famous phrase, "life, liberty 
and pursuit of happiness — and the greatest 
of these was the latter, which brings us to 
bundling," the delightful subject of this picture. 

PURSUIT 




with 

Francis Lederer • Joan Bennett 
Charlie Ruggles • Mary Boland 
Wa Iter Kingsford 
Directed by Ralph Murphy 




BACK 
PORCH 



with 



W. C. FIELDS 



^ * TITLE TENTATIVE 



if it's a PARAMOUNT PICTURE it's the best show in town! 





... 6 Top Money Pictures headed by a smash attraction 
in ''The Big Broadcast/' a Sylvia Sidney picture and four other big features. 



It 




II 



DAMON RUNYON'S 

The LEMON 
DROP KID 

with 

JACK OAKIE 
and HELEN MACK 

Directed by 
WESLEY RUGGLES 



The 

YELLOW 
BARGAIN 



with 

EVELYN VENABLE 
LLOYD NOLAN 

Directed by 
JAMES FLOOD 



f it's a PARAMOUNT PICTURE it's the best show in town! 




J her 



no'- 



move 



01 



r\o' 



rves> 



her no' beCO m- 

orom' se ° j e 
nives P r<J or ma d 

ing the9 



hAae 
{or 




DECEMBER., . Paramount's Christmas tree blazes brightly with two of the 
year's big hits . . . MAE WEST in "Gentlemen's Choice" and BING CROSBY 
AND KITTY CARLISLE in "Here Is My Heart/' delivered to you for holiday business. 




HOME 
ON THE 
RANGE' 

with 

RANDOLPH SCOTT 



A sensational interna- 
tional special with a 
huge cast of players. 




if it's a PARAMOUNT PICTURE it's the best show in town! 




ROSTER OF PARAMOUNT PL 



SCTORS AND WRITERS 1934-35 



PLAYERS Adrienne Ames • Richard Arlen • George Barbier • Mary Boland • Whitney Bourne 
Grace Bradley • Carl Brisson • Geo. Burns & Gracie Allen • Kitty Carlisle • Claudette Colbert 
Gary Cooper • Larry Crabbe • Eddie Craven • Bing Crosby • Alfred Delcambre • Katherine DeMille 
Marlene Dietrich • Jessica Dragonette • Frances Drake • W. C. Fields • William Frawley • Frances Fuller 
Paul Gerrits • Gwenllian Gill • Cary Grant • Jack Haley • Charlotte Henry • Miriam Hopkins 
Dean Jagger • Roscoe Karns • Charles Laughton • Baby LeRoy • John Lodge • Carole Lombard 
Pauline Lord • Ida Lupino •• Helen Mack • Fred MacMurray • Julian Madison • Margo • Joan Marsh 
Herbert Marshall • Gertrude Michael • Raymond Milland • Lillian Moore • Joe Morrison • Lloyd Nolan 
Jack Oakie • Lynne Overman • Gail Patrick • Joe Penner • George Raft • Claude Rains • Lyda Roberti 
Lanny Ross • Jean Rouverol • Charlie Ruggles • Randolph Scott • Clara Lou Sheridan • Sylvia Sidney 
Alison Skipworth • Sir Guy Standing • Colin Tapley • Kent Taylor • Eldred Tidbury • Lee Tracy 
Evelyn Venable *• Mae West • Henry Wilcoxon • Dorothy Wilson • Howard Wilson • Toby Wing 

DIRECTORS Charles Barton • Willia m Beaudine • Cecil B. DeMille • James Flood • Marion Gerinq 
Alexander Hall • Henry Hathaway • Arthur Jacobson • Mitchell Leisen • Ernst Lubitsch • Leo McCarey 
Norman McLeod • Wm. Cameron Menzies • Ralph Murphy • Jean Negulesco • Elliott Nugent 
Gilbert Pratt • Wesley Ruggles • Edward Sedgwick • Arthur Sircom • Norman Taurog 
Harlan Thompson • Frank Tuttle • Charles Vidor • Josef von Sternberg • Alfred Werker 

WRITERS Frank R. Adams • Charles Barton* • Claude Binyon • Charles Brackett • Laurie Brazee 
Dana Burnet • Bartlett Cormack • Jack Cunningham • Walter DeLeon • Finley Peter Dunne, Jr. • Guy Endore 
Herbert Fields • Garrett Fort • Lewis Foster • Howard Green • Elmer Harris • Ben Hecht* • Cyril Hume 
Grover Jones • Paul Jones • Vincent Lawrence • Gladys Lehman • Charles Logue • Charles MacArthur* 
Jeanie Macpherson • Doris Malloy • Francis Martin • John McDermott • J. P. McEvoy • Wm. Slavens McNutt 
Wm. Cameron Menzies* • Alice D. G. Miller • Jack Mintz • Paul Moss • Seena Owen • Frank Partos 
Humphrey Pearson • Arthur Phillips • Gilbert Pratt* • Marguerite Roberts • Peter Ruric • Harry Ruskin 
Dore Schary • Raymond L. Schrock • Chandler Sprague • Jane Storm • Harlan Thompson* • Keene Thompson 
Dale Van Every • Virginia Van Upp • Bobby Vernon • Garnett Weston • Waldemar Young 



"Also Directors 



Thursday. July 5, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Fox Met. Deal 
AgainDelayed 
After Hearing 



(Continued from page 1) 

a price of $5,000,000. The Loew- 
Warner joint offer is $4,000,000 for 
title to the 87 leaseholds and fee prop- 
erties of the circuit, and reflects no 
demand on the bidders' part for the 
committee's bonds. 

J. Robert Rubin, Loew's counsel, 
intimated that if the $5,000,000 figure 
had been mentioned by the committee 
he hadn't heard it. 

"I've heard a different figure from 
two of the three members of the sub- 
committee," Rubin told the court. 

The sub-committee will have an op- 
portunity to speak louder when it re- 
sumes its meetings today with the 
Loew-Warner representatives. 

Another time-consuming point in the 
negotiations up to now, it was re- 
vealed, has been whether or not 
Loew's and Warners have the right to 
examine, as requested by them, a sched- 
ule of grosses and operating expenses 
of the individual houses of the Fox 
Met circuit. The bidders contended 
that the information was essential to 
the min order to prepare a schedule 
of values through which they could 
arrive at a maximum or final bid. The 
bondholders' committee refused to sup- 
ply this information, but after a four- 
hour adjournment from a morning 
session to mid-afternoon Tuesday, dur- 
ing which attorneys conferred with 
the committee, it was agreed to fur- 
nish the bidders with sundry other 
data which had theretofore been re- 
fused. 

Object to Statements 

Attorneys for Skouras and Rand- 
force, operators of the circuit, ob- 
jected that giving out the earnings 
statements would place the houses at 
the "mercy of the companies with 
which the bidders ar eassociated" in 
the event the sale to Loew's and 
Warners was not consummated. 

"They would charge as much film 
rental against the houses as they knew 
the traffic would bear," the Randforce 
attorney complained to the court. 

Other suspicions aired in this con- 
nection were that the bidders would 
be placed in a position where they 
could acquire the houses showing a 
profit and duck the perennial losers in 
a final deal. 

Rubin protested that the bidders re- 
quired the information only because 
the committee, he said, was not pre- 
pared to deliver all of the leases and 
it was necessary for Loew's and War- 
ners to know whether it was losing 
valuable or worthless properties in the 
event of lease withdrawals by land- 
lords. 

"It seems to me," Judge Mack inter- 
posed at this point, "that that is the 
difficulty which confronts any outside 
bidder coming into this picture. The 
committee can sell you its bonds, and 
you know what it has, but it cannot 
guarantee you that all of the land- 
lords will renew leases with you if you 
buy the assets of the circuit, which 
are its leases, rather than the bonds." 

The bondholders' committee, agree- 
ing to a further delay in the hearing 
until tomorrow, stated that there was 
enough promise of an eventual agree- 
ment being reached to warrant con- 
tinuing negotiations with the Loew- 



Warner representatives. Skouras and 
Randforce representatives opposed the 
postponement, declaring that the de- 
lays have already hampered next sea- 
son's earnings seriously, and that the 
necessity of making new season film 
buys, negotiating new labor contracts 
and disposing of other urgent mat- 
ters made it imperative to settle the 
issue immediately. 

John H. Amen, special assistant to 
the attorney general in charge of anti- 
trust cases, attended Tuesday's hear- 
ing "as an observer," he said. Motion 
Picture Daily disclosed exclusively 
on June 27 that the government was 
interested in possible anti-trust 
angles of a successful Loew-Warner 
bid and that Albert J. Law, a special 
investigator for the Department of 
Justice, had been assigned to study 
developments. 

Pittsburgh Quashes 
5 Clearance Charges 

Pittsburgh, July 4.— Five clear- 
ance complaints were dismissed and 
three grievances have been heard here. 

Clearance complaints which were 
dismissed because, it was held, they 
do not affect existing contracts and 
will be taken care of with publication 
of the uniform zoning schedule for 
this territory, are: 

Ike and Harry Browarsky, pro- 
tested seven-day clearance of War- 
ners' Kenyon, Pittsburgh, over plain- 
tiff's Bellevue at Bellevue; Ike Bro- 
warsky, protested 14-day clearance of 
Warners' Kenyon over plaintiff's Hip- 
podrome, Pittsburgh; F. Panoplos, 
Clairton, Pa., protested 28-day clear- 
ance of Warners' Harris-Memorial 
and Victor, at McKeesport, over 
plaintiff's State at Clairton; Mrs. L. 
Muir protested 28-day clearance of 
Warners' Harris-Memorial and Vic- 
tor over plaintiff's Grand at Eliza- 
beth, and Beedle Bros, protested sev- 
en-day clearance of Warners' Harris- 
State and Washington at Washing- 
ton, Pa., over plaintiff's Alhambra and 
Strand at Cannonsburg. 

Grievance complaints heard were: 
Alleged overbuying by Warners' Ken- 
yon, Pittsburgh, charged by North 
Side Amusement Co., operating the 
Garden, Pittsburgh. Complaint dis- 
missed on the grounds that no proof 
of overbuying had been submitted. 

Complaint against Warners' Sheri- 
dan Square and Cameraphone, Pitts- 
burgh, by Harris Amusement Co., 
operating the Family, charging that 
the two Warner houses received the 
privilege of playing pictures before 
the end of the first run clearance, 
whereas the complainant's competing 
house did not. Complaint dismissed on 
the ground that the board was with- 
out jurisdiction. 

Complaint against Harry Fleishman, 
operating the Brighton, brought by 
Warners' Kenyon, charging admission 
reductions by issuance of script books 
and staging of lotteries. Defendant 
ordered to discontinue practices im- 
mediately. 

U. A. in Good Shape 
On Films — Lichtman 

(Continued from page 1) 

several, headed by "The Mighty Bar- 
num." 

"I feel confident that by January 
United Artists will have completed 
half its program for the new season," 
Lichtman asserts. 

The four completed are : "Bulldog 
Drummond Strikes Back," "Affairs 
of Cellini," "The Last Gentleman" 
and "The Private Life of Don Juan." 



Production Slows 
Under New Policy 



(Continued from page 1) 

of preparation. The result of more 
precaution and time in editing is mani- 
fested in the summary showing 45 fea- 
tures and 30 shorts now in the cutting 
rooms. 

M-G-M continues to be the busiest 
lot with six features in work, two pre- 
paring and 14 in the cutting rooms ; 
Warners have six, two and eight; 
Universal, five, one and one; Fox, 
four, two and two; Paramount, three, 
two and five ; Columbia, three, two and 
and four ; Radio, three, three and 
three, while the independent have 
three, five and eight. 

In the short subject division M-G-M 
reports two working, two preparing 
and four editing ; Roach has one, two 
and four ; Universal, zero, zero and 
two ; Columbia, zero, one and three ; 
Warners, zero, zero and one ; Radio, 
zero, four and 12, while the indepen- 
dents have four, three and four. 



ITOA Loses Move to 
Go Into State Court 

(Continued from page 1) 

proceed to argue its original motion 
for an injunction to restrain Campi 
from refusing to permit non-assenters 
to the code from filing complaints with 
code boards, Campi may move within 
30 days to have the case withdrawn 
for failure to state a cause of action. 

I.T.O.A. initiated its action against 
Campi in Federal Court several weeks 
ago, but withdrew it in order to file 
an identical action in state Supreme 
Court, believing that state laws of- 
fered more relief than Federal laws in 
the matter. Hugh A. Fulton, of Cra- 
vath, de Gersdorff, Swaine & Wood, 
attorneys for Campi, had the case 
reinstated in Federal Court on the 
ground that the state court lacked 
jurisdiction. I.T.O.A.'s unsuccessful 
move of Tuesday was a new attempt 
to return the case to the state court. 



Darrow to Be Guest 
At IT OA's Luncheon 

Clarence Darrow, anti-NRA gladia- 
tor and special critic of the film code, 
is scheduled to be guest of honor at 
the regular meeting of the I. T. O. 
A. at the Astor today, according to 
a press notice issued following a meet- 
ing of the board of directors of the 
organization Tuesday. 

Harry Brandt, I. T. O. A. presi- 
dent, will make an "important an- 
nouncement" at the luncheon meeting, 
it was stated at the same time. The 
meeting will be open to the press 
which has been barred from the or- 
ganization's gatherings since the code 
meetings it sponsored last summer. 



Summon NRA Officials 

Seattle, July 4. — The NRA com- 
pliance director and compliance of- 
ficer for the State of Washington have 
been cited to appear in court next week 
in a case brought by Clara Cohen and 
Sam Sax, owner and manager of the 
Rex. The order obtained from Judge 
Roscoe R. Smith directs the officials 
to show cause why the theatre oper- 
ators should not be granted arbitration 
in a wage question. At the present 
time the theatre is being picketed. 



19 



K. C. Indies 
Draft Campi 
Zone Appeal 



Kansas City, July 4. — Protesting 
the provision of the new clearance 
schedule that subsequents must main- 
tain a fixed price or be set back five 
cents in the price scale, a group of in- 
dependents have drafted an appeal for 
forwarding to Campi. 

Two clearance and zoning board 
members have also voiced objection to 
the clause which was adopted over 
their protest. 

W. D. Fulton, spokesman for the 
protesting indies, said at least 20 out 
of 32 indie suburbans in Kansas City, 
Mo., would sign the appeal. Fred 
Meyn, zoning board member for Kan- 
sas City, Kan., said subsequents there 
were preparing an appeal on the same 
ground. He called it price-fixing. 

Independents assert the clause binds 
them to one price and prevents flexi- 
ble admissions on pictures of different 
calibres. They demand the right to 
move admissions up or down and offer 
occasional bargain prices. 

Harry Taylor, Columbia manager, 
representing unaffiliated distributors on 
the board, and William Benjamin, 
Universal manager, as well as inde- 
pendent exchanges object to the clause. 

Long Island Towns' 
Clearance Decided 

Smithtown and Port Jefferson in 
Long Island shall be given the same 
availability, according to a decision 
of the New York clearance and zon- 
ing board Tuesday. A general ses- 
sion of Long Island exhibitors af- 
fected was held in order to clear up 
the situation. 

The decision further adds that there 
shall not be clearance between Say- 
ville, Port Jefferson or Smithtown 
and films become available as fol- 
lows : 

Patchogue and Bay Shore shall have 14 
days' clearance over the above mentioned 
towns if both towns play day and date 
with each other. However, when Bay 
Shore follows Patchogue, Bay Shore shall 
have only seven days' clearance. 

Huntington and Huntington Station shall 
have seven days' clearance over Smith - 
town on first run pictures. In the event 
any picture plays second run in Hunting- 
ton or Huntington Station, that theatre 
shall not have any clearance over Smith - 
town. Pictures are to become avail- 
able for Smithtown and Port Jefferson 
considering the above prior run. 



Coast's New Zoning 
Plan Is Mailed Out 

Los Angeles, July 4. — Copies of the 
new clearance and zoning schedule 
have been mailed to all independents, 
whether or not members of the South- 
ern California I.T.O.A. 

Opinion among the indies is that it 
is 90 per cent satisfactory and a step 
in advance for everyone. Exhibitors 
have 30 days in which to file protests 
and to be heard. 

Members of the association are con- 
sidering a plan to maintain a represen- 
tative at Code Authority in New York 
to take care of independents' problems. 
The idea is to raise funds for the pur- 
pose and have a man familiar with 
clearance problems rather than a law- 
yer. 



HAT SHOWMEN THINK 



f th 



MANAGERS' ROUND TABLE 
CLUB . . . 



JAMES R. PARTLOW. manager, 
Tipp Amusement Company, Tip- 
pecanoe City, Ohio. — I have 
found your section and the Herald 
in general to be of great aid to a 
"newly born" exhibitor, and am 
hoping, before long, to be able to 
contribute some things which may 
be of value to other showmen. 



JAMES E. DELANEY, Delaney 
Theatre, Gananoque, Ont., Can- 
ada. — I find the Herald and the 
Round Table the greatest help one 
can employ and will never be with- 
out it. In my estimate, it is worth 
ten times ten its cost. I hope to 
help you now, as soon as I can, in 
return. 



FRANK BOUCHER, city manager, 
Warner Bros., Hagerstown, Md. — 
The Motion Picture Herald and 
the Managers' Round Table Club 
are to be congratulated on in- 
augurating campaigns to stimulate 
showmanship. 



SECTION OF 

MOTION 
PICTURE 
HERALD 



JACK HOWE, manager, New 
Theatre, Woodstock, Va. — I have 
been keeping up with your Round 
Table section in the Herald weekly 
and I believe that if all exhibitors 
and managers would spend a little 
more time going over the Club 
pages, the depression for the ex- 
hibitors in the motion picture busi- 
ness would soon be at an end. 



R. D. LEATHERMAN, manager, 
Queen Theatre, Abilene, Texas. — 
No manager can operate a the- 
atre and know what he is doing 
without a Herald on his desk. The 
Round Table section is invaluable. 



J. L. CARTWRIGHT, city man- 
ager, Halifax Theatres, Inc., Day- 
tona Beach, Fla. — I think you have 
done marvelous work with your 
Managers' Round Table section, 
and you deserve congratulations 
as I believe it is greatly improved. 
I read it with a great deal of in- 
terest because it is "chuck" full of 
splendid ideas, and I have been 
very careful to keep a complete 
file. 



JOE KINSKY, district manager, 
Capitol and Garden Theatres, 
Davenport, Iowa. — Without try- 
ing to kid you, the Motion Picture 
Herald, and especially the Round 
Table Club, is a part of my life. 
I take all the copies home and I 
get a great deal more pleasure 
reading them than I do the news- 
papers. My wife is just as inter- 
ested in your publications as I 
am. In fact, we both find pleasant 
hours every week going over the 
magazine from cover to cover. 



RICHARD L. MOSS, manager, 
California Theatre, San Diego, 
Cal. . . In offering the exploitation 
awards, the Managers' Round 
Table Club, the Motion Picture 
Herald and Mr. Quigley have 
added another accomplishment to 
the already long list for this pub- 
lication. 



R. E. WATSON, unemployed man- 
ager, Los Angeles, Cal. — The 
Herald happens to be the only 
paper that does keep one posted, 
and I would be at a loss without it. 



THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE FOR 



CIRCULATION 



SID S. HOLLAND, city manager, 
Elkhart Amusement Co., Elkhart, 
Ind. — Your sponsorship of the 
award of the Martin Quigley 
plaques for 1934 exploitation is 
another indication of the splendid 
cooperation emanating from the 
Round Table Club. 



EDWARD HARRISON, manager, 
Capitol Theatre, Pittsfield, Mass. 
— Want you to know that your 
Round Table department is very 
much appreciated. 



LEON PICKLE, manager, Ken- 
tucky Theatre, Henderson, Ky. — I 
hope that my ideas may be of as 
much help to some of the other 
members as their ideas have been 
to me in the past. Your depart- 
ment in the Herald is the depart- 
ment of showmen, for showmen, 
and the first to be read, from be- 
ginning to end, every week. 



MERRILL F. HANNA, manager, 
Hollywood Theatre, Detroit, Mich. 
— We depend on the Herald in 
many ways, and your Club pages 
remain as interesting as always. 
Have arranged a filing system for 
the Heralds, having two years of 
copies neatly stacked away, with 
a separate little file classifying all 
the stunts of interest, what edition 
they were in, etc. 



HAROLD W. EVENS, manager, 
Loew's State, St. Louis, Mo. — I 
enjoy your Round Table depart- 
ment very much and find it very 
often valuable. 



ABE COHEN, manager, Schine's 
Massena Theatre, Massena, N. Y. 
— ... I am always interested in 
what the other fellow is doing, 
therefore I always turn to your 
Round Table pages first when I 
receive my Herald. 




-MIKE VOGEL, Chairman 
Managers' Round Table Club 



JOE FELDMAN, Warner Brothers 
Theatres, Pittsburgh, Pa. — I don't 
suppose you would mind a com- 
pliment, since so few are usually 
the lot of trade paper editors. I 
think you guys are doing a re- 
markably showmanlike job in 
whooping up the Quigley Publica- 
tions, and a white orchid is due 
you because the manner of pro- 
moting these publications is prov- 
ing an inestimable service to live- 
wire showmen. 



NEVIN McCORD. manager, 
Granada Theatre, Boise, Idaho. — 
I appreciate the way in which I 
have been honored by the Motion 
Picture Herald and every one con- 
nected with the presentation of 
the Quigley Award for March. 
. . . The Round Table has always 
been a most valuable guide to me 
in my work. I have followed its 
suggestions from my early days in 
the theatre. 

4 

WALTER L. GOLDEN, Riverside, 
Jacksonville, Fla. — I honestly be- 
lieve that winning the April Quig- 
ley Award was the proudest mo- 
ment of my life, for I have never 
received anything that I value so 
highly. ... I want to thank you 
and everyone concerned for the 
consideration you gave me in 
this . . . and you can count on 
me to come right back as soon as 
we get a picture that will warrant 
a campaign. 



C. J. OTTS, manager, Palace The- 
atre, Rayse City, Texas. — I enjoy 
the Round Table discussions. They 
have proven quite helpful numer- 
ous times. I hope you keep up 
the good work. 



M. D. UTTERBACK, Lyric Theatre, 
Wellington, Kansas. — The Round 
Table columns are wonderful. 
They give an exhibitor an idea of 
how to play his show before he 
shows it. I find all of these stunts 
are good or the exhibitor wouldn't 
take the time to send them in if 
they weren't a success, but pass 
it on so someone else can profit 
by his successful experiment. We 
all are looking for new stunts that 
will bring them in without spend- 
ing too much money. 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Looking 9 Em Over 



"I Can't Escape" 

(Beacon Prod.) 

Though its story may be commonplace to a certain extent, "I Can't 
Escape" seems to be made to order for neighborhood houses. A credit 
to the film is the high quality of its settings and the acting of the prin- 
cipals, especially Onslow Stevens, Lila Lee and Russell Gleason. There 
are also some good directorial touches. 

Stevens, on parole, meets Miss Lee, an "on call" girl, and falls in love 
with her. They take vows to go straight and decide to buck life together. 
There is much footage devoted to Stevens' efforts to get a job. Finally 
he lands one with a crooked investment firm, which hires him with the 
intention of letting him take the rap should there be a run-in with the 
law. To advance their scheme the partners in the firm require him to 
adopt an assumed name. 

When Gleason pops into the picture determined on killing Stevens 
in the belief he was responsible for selling his father phoney stock and 
driving him to suicide, Stevens takes him into his home in the hope he 
may be able to win him away from the idea of committing murder. 
When the partners skip with $100,000 invested in bad stock by a widow, 
Gleason discovers who Stevens really is, but forgets his animosity and 
makes it possible to apprehend the crooked brokers. 

Other players are Otis Harlan, Clara Kimball YoUng, Nat Carr, Eddie 
Gribbon and Kane Richmond. Otto Brower directed. Running time, 59 
minutes. 



"The Star Packer" 

(Lone Star-Monogram) 

Patterned after the customary western formula, this John Wayne 
vehicle has its share of action and thrills for kid audiences and the 
western enthusiasts. There is the bandit infested territory with the 
mysterious outlaw leader, the stage coach holdups, shootings of stage 
drivers and sheriffs, the runaway coach with the romantic interest 
aboard, Verna Hillie, in this case, and the tracking of the outlaw leader 
and his ultimate downfall caused by Wayne, who takes the girl as his 
reward. 

Fitted to this pattern are some good action episodes in the form of 
fist fighting, hard and fast riding, thrilling rescues and shooting scrapes 
on a wholesale scale which should satisfy those who like their film fare 
staged in the wide open spaces. Running time, 56 minutes. 

"Winters"and "Dynamite," 
Bernie Smash Fight Film, 
Detroit Draw Frisco Lead 



22 



Heat Wallops 
All Broadway 
Grosses Hard 



Heat and outdoor attractions com- 
bined to hit Broadway grosses last 
week. 

"Operator 13" made the best com- 
parative showing, but this was pretty 
dull. It took $34,000 at the Capitol, 
with Abe Lyman's band and Leo Car- 
rillo on the stage. 

The Music Hall was down to $61,- 
000 on "Let's Try Again." At the 
Paramount "The Great Flirtation" 
reached only $17,500. "Dr. Monica" 
had $15,815 at the Strand, and "Af- 
fairs of a Gentleman" took $13,700 
at the Roxy. 

Estimated takings : 

Week Ending June 27: 
"HALF A SINNER" (Univ.) 
MAYFAIR— (2,300), 35c-85c, 7 days. 
Gross: $3,200. 

"LET'S TRY AGAIN" (Radio) 
RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL — (5,945), 
35c-$1.65, 7 days. Stage show. Gross: $61,- 
000. 

Week Ending June 28: 
'^OPERATOR 13" (M-G-M) 

CAPITOL— (4,700), 35c-$1.65, 7 days. 
Stage: Abe Lyman and band, also Leo 
Carrillo and others. Gross: $34,000. 
"LIFE OF VERGIE WINTERS" (Radio) 

PALACE— (2,500), 25c-75c, 7 days. Vaude- 
ville. Gross: $11,000. 

"THE GREAT FLIRTATION" 

PARAMOUNT— (3,700), 35c-99c, 6 days. 
Stage show. Gross: $17,500. 
"AFFAIRS OF A GENTLEMAN" (Univ.) 

ROXY— (6,200), 25c-55c, 7 days. Vaude- 
ville. Gross: $13,700. 

"DR. MONICA" (Warners) 

STRAND— (2,000), 25c-$1.10, 7 days. 
Gross: $15,815. 

Week Ending June 29: 

"MURDER AT THE VANITIES" (Para.) 
—4 days 

"SUCH WOMEN ARE DANGEROUS" 
(Fox) — 3 days 

RKO CENTER— (3,700), 25c-55c, 7 days. 
Gross: $4,000. 

Agent Fair Practice 
Code Is Discussed 

Hollywood, July 4. — The entire 
code of fair practice between pro- 
ducers and agents and the latter's 
clients was discussed behind closed 
doors at the office of Emanuel Cohen 
of Paramount. Writers and actors 
weighed means of securing one code 
dealing with relations between agents 
and those they represent. 

Developments at the meeting will 
be held under advisement until July 
16, when a vote will be taken on a 
single plan of fair practice. 

Cohen, B. B. Kahane, Winfield 
Sheehan and Jack Warner represented 
producers; Adolphe Menjou, actors; 
Wells Root, writers ; George Frank, 
agents ; Frank Lloyd, directors, and 
J. M. Nickolaus, technicians. Frank 
presided. Kahane will preside at the 
next meeting. 

Trem Carr, fifth producer repre- 
sentative, could not be present, as 
he was recently operated upon. His 
condition is reported worse at the 
Cedars of Lebanon Hospital. 



Will Post Release Dates 

Buffalo, July 4. — General release 
dates on all pictures will be filed on 
the bulletin board in the office of the 
Buffalo code boards, 505 Pearl street, 
for guidance of exhibitors who need 
the information in requesting can- 
cellations. 



Detroit. July 4. — In a week of hot 
competition for the Rotarian conven- 
tion trade the Fox, with a combination 
of "The Life of Vergie Winters" and 
Ben Bernie and his band ran up to 
$28,200, topping normal by $13,200. 

The Michigan met this competition 
with $21,800 on "Smarty" and Cab 
Calloway and his orchestra. The 
competition was tough on other houses. 

Total first run business was $67,700. 
Average is $65,000. 

Estimated takings for the week 
ending June 28 : 

"THE THIN MAN" (M-G-M) 
(2nd Run) 

FISHER— (2.975). 15c-50c. 7 days. Gross: 
$6,800. (Average, $10,000) 
"LIFE OF VERGIE WINTERS" (Radio) 

FOX— (5.100), 15c-50c, 7 days. Stage: 
Ben Bernie and All the Lads. Gross: 
$28,200. (Average, $15,000) 

"SMARTY" (Warners) 

MICHIGAN — (4,100), 15c-50c, 7 days. 
Stage: Cab Calloway and His Cotton Club 
Orchestra. Gross: $21,800. (Average, 
$20,000) 

BAER-CARNERA FIGHT 
"STOLEN SWEETS" (Chesterfield) 

STATE— (3.000). 35c-50c, 7 days. Gross: 
$3,600. (Average, $10,000) 

"GAMBLING LADY" (Warners) 
UNITED ARTISTS— (2,070), 25c-50c, 7 
days. Gross: $7,300. (Average, $10,000) 



Sax Francisco. July 4. — Three 
houses skimmed the cream off the first 
run business here last week. At the 
Golden Gate a combination of "Strictly 
Dynamite" and the Baer-Carnera fight 
reached $19,000, over normal by $6,000. 

Total first run business was $70,000. 
Average is $70,000. 

Estimated takings : 

Week Ending June 26: 

"STRICTLY DYNAMITE" (Radio) 

GOLDEN GATE— (2,800). 25c-35c-40c. 7 
davs. Stage: Band. Baer-Carnera fight pic- 
tures. Gross: $19,000. (Average. $13,000) 

Week Ending June 27: 

"AFFAIRS OF A GENTLEMAN" (Univ.) 
"ORDERS IS ORDERS" (Gaumont) 

ORPHEUM— (3.000). 15c-25c-35c-40c. 7 
davs. Happy-Go-Lucky radio stars on stage. 
Gross: $5,000. (Average, $9,000) 

Week Ending June 28: 
"BLACK MOON" (Col.) 
"BIG TIME OR BUST" (Tower) 

FOX— (4.600), 10c-15c-25c-35c. 7 days. 
Stage: Vaudeville. Gross: $6,500. (Average, 
$9,000) 

"MANY HAPPY RETURNS" (Para.) 
"SIDE STREETS" (Warners) 

PARAMOUNT— (2,670), 15c-35c-40c-65c, 7 
days. Gross: $8,500. (Average, $12,000) 
"THIN MAN" (M-G-M) 
ST. FRANCIS— (1,400). 15c-25c-40c-65c, 7 
days. Gross: $8,500. (Average. $8,000) 
"LITTLE MISS MARKER" (Para.) 
WARFIELD— (2,700), 25c-35c-55c-65c, 7 
days. Stage: Walter Winchell, band. Gross: 
$22,500. (Average, $19,000) 



Thursday, July 5, 1934 



"Sailors" and 



Fight Hold in 
Philadelphia 



Philadelphia, July 4. — Hot 
weather and the church boycott took 
the starch out of Philly's film busi- 
ness last week. 

Only the Fox, with the Baer- 
Carnera fight pictures held over for a 
second week to help the stage show 
and "She Learned About Sailors," got 
a good break, grossing $15,000. In 
spite of the fact that the fight films 
had already been released to the 
second runs, they proved a draw at 
the Fox. 

The Earle was fair with $11,500 for 
"Personality Kid" and a stage show. 
"The Thin Man," all breaks consid- 
ered, did well with $10,500 at the 
Stanley. 

Total first run business was $54,800. 
Average is $60,900. 

Estimated takings for the week 
ending June 28 : 

"30-DAY PRINCESS" (Para.) 
(2nd run) 

ARCADIA— (600), 25c-40c-50c, 6 days. 
Gross: SI. 800. (Average, $2,400) 

"WHERE SINNERS MEET" (Radio) 

BOYD— (2.400), 40c-55c-65c, 6 days. Gross: 
$8,000. (Average, $12,000) 
"THE PERSONALITY KID" (Warners) 

EARLE— (2,000;, 40c-55c-65c, 6 days. 
Stage: Wesley Eddy, Sibyl Bowan, the 
Lee Gails, Verdi and Lee. Gross: $11,500. 
(Average. $12,000) 

"SHE LEARNED ABOUT SAILORS" 
(Fox) 

FOX— (3,000), 30c-40c-60c, 6 days. Stage: 
Roxy Theatre Ensemble, Serge Flash. 3 
Samuels Brothers, Bernardo de Pace. Also 
Baer-Carnera fight films for a second 
week. Gross: $15,000. (Average, $12,000) 
"PRIVATE SCANDAL" (Para.) 
KARLTON— (1.000), 30c-40c-50c, 6 davs. 
Gross: $2,500. (Average, $3,500) 

"THE THIN MAN" (M-G-M) 
STANLEY— (3,700), 40c-55c-65c, 6 davs. 
Gross: $10,500. (Average, $12,000) 

"THE BLACK CAT" (Univ.) 
STANTON— (1.700), 30c-40c-55c, 6 davs. 
Gross: $5,500. (Average. $7,000) 



"Winters" Fair as 
Providence Slumps 

Providence. July 4. — It was another 
week of small grosses with showmen 
trying to compete with the lure of 
outdoors. RKO Albee was the only 
house to come anywhere near its aver- 
age, catching $6,500 with "Life of 
Vergie Winters" and "Let's Try 
Again." Majestic, Loew's and Para- 
mount had small takes. 

Total first run business was $27,500. 
Average is $40,500. 

Estimated takings for the week- 
ending June 28 : 

"FOG OVER FRISCO" (F.N.) 
"THE CIRCUS CLOWN" (F.N.) 
MAJESTIC— (2.400), 15c-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $4,000. (Average, $7,000) 

"I GIVE MY LOVE" (Univ.) 
"HAROLD TEEN" (Warners) 
FAYS— (1,600), 15c-40c, 7 days. Gross: 
$3,000. (Average, $7,000) 

"BORN TO BE BAD" (M-G-M) 
LOEW'S STATE— (3,800). 15c-40c, 7 days. 
Benny Davis on stage. Gross: $9,000. 
(Average, $12,000) 
"MANY HAPPY RETURNS" (Para.) 

"FIFTEEN WIVES" (Chesterfield) 
PARAMOUNT— (2,300), 15c-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $4,000. (Average, $6,500) 
"LIFE OF VERGIE WINTERS" (Radio) 
"LET'S TRY AGAIN" (Radio) 
RKO ALBEE— (2,300), 15c-40c, 7 davs. 
Gross: $6,500. (Average, $7,000) 

"MYSTERY LINER" (Col.) 
"BLUE STEEL" (Col.) 
RKO VICTORY— (1,600), 10c-25c, 4 days. 
Gross: $1,000. (Average, $1,000) 



The Leading 




Picture 
Industry 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Alert, 
Intelligent 



mm m 

Faithfuli h 

- < m 

Servj^^# 
the Industry 
in All 
Branches 



VOL. 36. NO. 4 



NEW YORK, FRIDAY, JULY 6, 1934 



TEN CENTS 



Buying Co-op 
Revamps with 
A New Entity 

Detroit Group "Safe" 
Under Law: Moon 



Detroit, July 5. — Asserting all ques- 
tions of legality are now removed, 
Mid-States Theatres, Inc., Detroit 
booking combine long subject to local 
wrangling and target of many thrusts 
by local exhibitors, drops out of the 
picture and gives way to a new com- 
pany to be known as Co-operative 
Theatres of Michigan, Inc. 

Capitalized at $50,000 and incorpo- 
rated under a law passed in 1931, Co- 
operative hops all legal hurdles and 
finds itself comfortably ensconced 

(Continued on page 3) 



Chicago Overbuying 
Case Is An Enigma 

Chicago, July 5. — Case number one, 
Ben Bartelstein's complaint of over- 
buying against Schoenstadt, continues 
to be the enigma of the local grievance 
board. 

After many hearings Bartelstein was 
awarded 46 pictures in the three-cor- 
nered situation which involved his An- 
nette theatre, the Schoenstadt Palace 
and the Villas, all of Cicero. The 
(Continued oft page 3) 



Chicago FTC Probe 
Going to Washington 

Chicago, July 5. — The Federal 
Trade Commission probe into duals, 
sponsored by the I. T. O. A., is still 
under way with the report scheduled 
to go to James Horton, chief examiner 

(Continued on page 3) 



May Wipe Out Weak 
Issues on 'Changes 

Washington, July 5. — Elimination 
of weak and speculative issues from 
stock exchange listings in a number of 

(Continued on page 11) 



"Gwyn" to U. A. 

"Nell Gwyn," produced in 
London by British and Do- 
minion, has been acquired for 
American distribution by 
United Artists. 

This is the picture which 
Herbert Wilcox will preview 
at the Astor Tuesday night. 



Warners After Domination 

Of Northern Jersey Sector 

With acquisition practically set for eight theatres, Warners in- 
tend to further solidify their New Jersey holdings shortly. Nego- 
tiations are understood under way with a number of independents 
for theatres which will give Warners virtual domination in terri- 
tories in which they now operate. 

Operation of the five Bratter & Pollack and three Rapf & Rudin 
houses will be taken over within the next few weeks by Warners. 



Seeks Accord on Boycott; 
Delaware Talks Shutdown 



Wilmington, Del., July 5. — Inde- 
pendent exhibitors in this area assert 
that, unless the boycott by church 
members in protest against allegedly 
indecent pictures is lifted, they will 
have to close their houses. They state 
the boycott has become effective here. 
Announcement was also made that if 
the Warners and independents in the 
Philadelphia area are closed they will 
have to close here also because films 
will not be available. This slant was 
not explained. 

A. Joseph DeFiore of Wilmington, 

(Continued on page 6) 



The hope that it will be unneces- 
sary to close the 75 Stanley-Warner 
theatres in Philadelphia as a result of 
the church boycott of all houses in the 
archdiocese is expressed in a state- 
ment on the situation issued yesterday 
by Joseph W. Bernhard, general man- 
ager of Warner theatres. 

The statement concedes, however, 
"that if the boycott should succeed in 
its object it will clearly be impossible 
for us to continue to operate the 
theatres at a loss." 

Bernhard's statement comes as a 

(Continued on page 6) 



Arthur Will 
Oversee St. 
Louis Spots 



With approval of the sale of the 
Ambassador, Missouri and Grand Cen- 
tral in St. Louis to the bondholders' 
committee, Harry C. Arthur will per- 
sonally supervise operations when F. 
& M. takes them over. Acquisition 
becomes effective with dissolution of 

(Continued on page 16) 



Tussle Over 
Cleveland's 
Zoning Near 



Cleveland, July 5. — A fight over 
clearance proposed for Greater Cleve- 
land is in the making. Currently it is 
brewing over a special classification 
set up for downtown theatres charging 
15 cents during the day and 20 cents 
at night. Now getting product on the 

(Continued on page 3) 



Quality Clause in British 
Quota Act Seen Possibility 



By BRUCE ALLAN 

London, July 5. — Introduction into 
the Quota Act of a clause covering 
quality today loomed as a possibility, 
to be sponsored in exhibitor ranks, 
following the statement in Commons of 
Walter "Runciman, president of the 
British Board of Trade, that he would 
be pleased to consider any representa- 
tions from the industry relative to the 
quality of quota films. 



Runciman declared he had noted ex- 
hibitor protests at the recent C. E. A. 
convention at Blackpool, but pointed 
out more than double the statutory 
number of quota productions was 
available in the last quota year. 

His comment developed by way of 
reply to a question citing widespread 
theatre complaint allegedly arising 
from an unjust interpretation of the 
act itself. 



Darrow Will 
Aid ITOA on 
Code Revise 



With Lowell Mason Will 
Contribute Services 



Clarence Darrow, former head of 
the NRA Review Board, and Lowell 

B. Mason, former Review Board 
counsel, will contribute their services 
to the I. T. O. A. and other industry 
factions dissatisfied with the code in 
an effort to obtain changes in the 
code sought by independent groups, 
Harry Brandt, I. T. O. A. president, 
said yesterday at a luncheon meeting 
of his organization at the Astor. 

Darrow, scheduled to be the guest 
of honor at the meeting, did not at- 
tend. His absence was explained by 
Brandt as due to illness but Milton 

C. Weisman, counsel for I. T. O. A., 
told the meeting later that he had 

(Continued on page 3) 



See New Delay in 
Fox Met. Dickers 

A fifth postponement of the Federal 
court hearing for approval or disap- 
proval of the Loew-Warner $4,000,000 
offer for Fox Metropolitan Playhouses 
appears to be in prospect for today as 
a result of the inability of the bidders 
to conclude negotiations yesterday with 

(Continued on page 16) 



Salary Report Nears; 
Scope Halts Release 

Washington, July 5. — General sta- 
tistics and conclusions of the salary in- 
vestigation will probably be made 
public as soon after presentation on 
Saturday to General Johnson as the 
volume of work in the Government 
Printing Office will permit, it was 
said today by Division Administrator 
Sol A. Rosenblatt. 

The report will be so lengthy that 
mimeographing will be impossible, 
Rosenblatt declared. In all proba- 
bility, a week or more will be required 
for the document to go through the 
printing office. 



Clicks to $94,500 

"Of Human Bondage" closed 
its first week at the Music 
Hall Wednesday night to a 
$94,500 week, without tax, or 
$500 less than Motion Pic- 
ture Daily's estimate. The 
July 4 gross was $18,000. 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Friday, July 6, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 

(Registered U. S. Patent Office) 



Vol. 36 July 6, 1934 



No. 4 




Martin Quigley 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 
MAURICE KANN 

Editor 
JAMES A. CRON 
Advertising Manager 



Published daily except Sunday and holi- 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub- 
sidiary of Quigley Publications, Inc., 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 1790 Broadway, New 
York. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Cable ad- 
dress "Quigpubco, New York." All con- 
tents copyrighted 1934 by Motion Picture 
Daily, Ino. Address all correspondence to 
the New York Office. Other Quigley pub- 
lications: MOTION PICTURE HERALD, 
BETTER THEATRES, THE MOTION 
PICTURE ALMANAC and THE CHI- 
CAGOAN. 

Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Life 
Building, Vine and Yucca Streets, Victor 
M. Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 407 
South Dearborn Street, Edwin S. Clif- 
ford, manager; London Bureau: Remo 
House, 310 Regent St., London, W. 1, 
Bruce Allan, Representative. Cable address: 
"Quigpubco, London"; Berlin Bureau: 
Berlin - Tempelhof, Kaiserin - Augustastrasse 
28, Joachim K. Rutenberg, Representative; 
Paris Bureau: 19, Rue de la Cour des- 
Noues, Pierre Autre, Representative; Rome 
Bureau: Viale Gorizia, Vittorio Malpassuti, 
Representative; Sydney Bureau: 102 Sus- 
sex Street, Cliff Holt, Representative; Mex- 
ico City Bureau: Apartado 269, James 
Lockhart, Representative; Glasgow Bureau: 
86 Dundrennan Road, G. Holmes, Repre- 
sentative; Budapest Bureau: 11 Olasz 
Faspr 17, Endre Hevesi, Representative. 

Entered as second class matter January 
4, 1926 at the Post Office at New York 
City, N. Y., under Act of March 3, 1379. 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada $15 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 



"Me" Plans Retirement 

St. Louis, July 5. — Harry Nei- 
meyer, veteran critic and dramatic edi- 
tor of the Post-Dispatch, has decided 
to retire, it is learned unofficially. Nei- 
meyer, writing as "Nie," has gained 
a, large following for his fair and un- 
biased reviews. He will be 60 years 
old shortly and will leave shortly for 
Hollywood where he has purchased a 
home. 



Arthur Schlaifer Dead 

Omaha, July 5. — Funeral services 
were held here for Arthur D. Schlai- 
fer, 21, brother of Charles Schlaifer, 
advertising and publicity man for 
Blank Tri-States Theatres in Omaha. 



Myrna Loy III 

Hollywood, July 5. — Myrna Loy 
was taken ill while in San Francisco, 
necessitating her remaining there for 
an additional week. 

NOW ACCEPTING BOOKINGS 




SENSATIONAL AUTHENTIC FILMS 
SMUGGLED OUT OF GERMANY 

FOR STATE RIGHTS AND BOOKINGS 
WRITE OR WIRE 

JEWEL PRODUCTIONS, inc. 

723 SEVENTH AVE., NEW YORK CITY 



Film Gains Reported 
By Cleveland Bank 



Cleveland, July 5.— 
at approximately 80 
neighborhood houses 
County increased to a 
025 in the first five 
year, comparing with 
same period of 1933, 
land Trust Co. in an 
the Cleveland Press. 



Paid admissions 
first runs and 
in Cuyahoga 
total of $3,523,- 
months of this 

$2,147,876 in the 
says the Cleve- 

advertisement in 



ITOA Case on NIRA 
Validity Is Deferred 

Albany, July 5. — The Court of Ap- 
peals adjourned today until October 
without having decided the case of 
Sherman vs. Abies, which involves the 
Independent Theatre Owners' Ass'n. 
and Local 306, I. A. T. S. E., and the 
constitutionality of the NIRA and the 
state enabling act. 



Sues Eastman Kodak 

Rochester, July 5. — Eastman Ko- 
dak is being sued in Federal Court 
here by the Hill Manufacturing Co., 
Kansas City, Kan., which asks dam- 
ages of $9,000,000 on the charge of 
infringement on patents for refrigera- 
tion used in the making of film. The 
plaintiff alleges one of its machines 
was employed by the defendant as a 
model for a larger unit. 



Novarro Will Return 

Hollywood, July 5. — Ramon No« 
varro's new contract with M-G-M has 
prevented the actor from extending his 
concert tour to Europe. Novarro will 
leave Rio de Janeiro July 12 and will 
arrive in New York July 27, and in 
Hollywood August 1 where his first 
picture will be "In Old Vienna" with 
Evelyn Laye. 



Plans Still Formulating 

Hollywood, July 5. — Plans of 
Major Film Prod., recently authorized 
by the Federal Trade Commission to 
float its stock, are not sufficiently ad- 
vanced to talk about them, according 
to Fred Church, president of the com- 
pany. 



Re-Sign Elliott Nugent 

Hollywood, July 5. — Elliott Nug- 
ent has been handed a new contract 
by Paramount. The new ticket calls 
for the actor to do six pictures over 
a period of time extending to Sep- 
tember, 1935. 



Sandwich Films Win 
Victory in Memphis 

Memphis, July 5. — Movement to 
beat the blue laws by offering free 
films on Sunday with the purchase of 
food and drink has scored a victory 
here with the refusal of the Shelby 
County Grand Jury to hand down an 
indictment against Charles Mensing, 
manager of the Orpheum, who intro- 
duced the experiment recently. 

The theatre has been keeping open 
Sundays with a charge of 40 cents for 
a sandwich and a drink, with the pur- 
chaser's privilege of seeing a free 
show. On three occasions Mensing 
has been arrested and required to pay 
fines totaling $75. 

The action of the Grand Jury is be- 
lieved to have paved the way for the 
opening of other theatres on Sunday 
in this city and elsewhere in Ten- 
nessee. 



Sunday Films Allowed 

Bronxville, N. Y., July 5. — The 
showing of films on Sunday has been 
approved by the Bronxville Village 
Board. 



Goman Off Tomorrow 

George W. Goman, secretary of the 
West Coast Service Studios, sails to- 
morrow aboard the He de France in 
connection with a series of European- 
financed productions to be made in 
New York next season. He will be 
away six weeks or more. 



To East on Vacations 

Hollywood, July 5. — Miriam Hop- 
kins is enroute to New York for a 
two weeks' vacation before returning 
for the leading role in "Richest Girl 
in the World" at Radio. 

Gary Cooper, accompanied by his 
wife, has also left for New York. 



Salary Tiff Settled 

Hollywood, July 5. — The reported 
salary dispute between Claire Dodd 
and Warners has been amicably set- 
tled and the actress has taken up her 
term ticket where she left off two 
months ago. 



Brown Assigned Three 

Hollywood, July 5. — Harry J. 
Brown's first productions on a new 
associate producer's contract with 
Warners will be "Captain Blood," 
"The Case of the Curious Bride" and 
"The Irish in Us." 



Eastman Pfd. Off 2 on Big Board 

Net 
Change 

- Vs 

—2 

+ y* 



Low 

14 



High 

Consolidated Film Industries, pfd 14 

Eastman Kodak 99 

Eastman Kodak, pfd 143 143 

Fox Film "A" 13 13 

Loew's, Inc 28|4 277/ s 

Loew's, Inc., pfd 91 91 

Paramount Publix, cts 3}4 354 

Pathe Exchange 254 2%. 

Pathe Exchange "A" 2054 2014 

RKO 2'A 2% 

Warner Bros 554 5 



Close 

14 

98Vs 
US 
13 
28 
91 
354 

m 
2m 



—i 

- Vs 
+ Va. 
+ 54 



Vs 



Technicolor Up Eighth on Curb 



Net 

High Low Close Change 

Technicolor 1354 1354 1354 + H 

Trans Lux V/ 2 V/ 2 V/ 2 

Warner Bonds Advance % 

Net 

Low Close Change 



High 

General Theatre Equipment 6s '40 8 

Keith B. F. 6s '46 68%, 

Loew's 6s '41, ww deb rights 101 

Paramount Broadway 554s '51 4154 

Paramount Publix 554s '50 49% 

Warner Bros. 6s '39, wd 55 



687^ 


6&Vs 


101 


101 




4154 
4974 


5454 


55 



+ 5/2 

- Vt 

— 54 
+ 54 



Sales 

100 
200 
10 
500 

2.700 
100 
500 
100 
300 
100 

2,500 



Sales 
100 
100 



Sales 
1 
1 

2 
4 

2 
3 



< Purely 
Personal ► 

ARNOLD RITTENBERG of Men- 
tone is back from Atlantic City, 
where he attended the Columbia 
regional convention. "Ritt," whose 
company will release the "Spice of 
Life" one-reelers through Columbia, 
met many of the men who attended 
while operating theatres in many parts 
of the country. 

Lynn Shores, president of the 
West Coast Service Studios, leaves 
Monday with a camera and sound 
crew for up-state New York, where 
he will produce an industrial feature 
for the Niagara Hudson Power Co. 

Saul Trauner is full of smiles. The 
only Columbia salesman to sell 100 per 
of his possibilities this season, he was 
publicly commended for his enterprise 
by Abe Montague at the Columbia 
powwow down on the shore. 

Albert Sadacca of the Windsor 
Circuit, Brooklyn, suffered a broken 
artery in his leg at the I. T. O. A. 
luncheon yesterday and had to be re- 
moved to a hospital. 

W. Ray Johnston, Russell Bell, 
Harry Thomas and Phil Rosen are 
in the thick of a croquet contest on 
the grounds of the Bell manor in 
Ossining. 

Harry Rathner, of Principal, re- 
turned yesterday from a five-week 
tour of the country on which he sold 
"Chandu" and other pictures to state 
right distributors. 

Claire Julianne is en route to 
Hollywood with style dope for use of 
the Wampas "Baby Stars" in "Young 
and Beautiful." Mascot will produce. 

Hal Sugarman, U. A. manager 
in Panama, is in town for a short 
vacation. He is scheduled to sail 
for Panama on the 19th. 

Paul Benjamin leaves today for 
North Carolina to visit his sister. He's 
on vacation. 

William Scully has gone to New 
England on an M-G-M business trip. 

Wesley Eddy returns as master 
of ceremonies at the Roxy shortly. 

Oscar Doob of Loew's is on the 
vacation list. 



u iT Signs Child, 2i/ 2 

Hollywood, July 5. — Juanita Quig- 
ley, two and a half years old, has 
been signed by Universal for a role 
in "Imitation of Life," upon the com- 
pletion of which she will go under a 
long-term contract. 



Sets Record for Fourth 

Los Angeles, July 5. — Loew's State 
here broke all house records yesterday 
for the Fourth since its opening, play- 
ing to 10,400 admissions, with "Opera- 
tor 13" the attraction. 



Anna Wong Returning 

Hollywood, July 5. — Anna May 
Wong leaves England, July 8, leav- 
ing directly for Hollywood to take an 
important spot in Paramount's "Lime- 
house Nights." 



Epstein London-Bound 

Dave Epstein, well-known Holly- 
wood agent, is in New York prepara- 
tory to a London business trip. He 
expects to sail on the He de France 
tomorrow. 



Friday. July 6, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



3 



Darrow Will 
Aid ITOA on 

Code Revise 

(.Continued from paqe 1) 

met Darrow at the train on his ar- 
rival from Washington yesterday and 
urged him not to attend if he felt in 
need of rest. Mason was there, how- 
ever, and spoke in Darrow's place, as- 
suring the more than 100 exhibitors 
present that both Darrow and himself 
would work against the code in their 
behalf, believing the code to be "the 
most pernicious that has come under 
the scrutiny of the Review Board." 

Brandt stated that Darrow would 
work without compensation. While 
in New York, the Chicago criminal 
attorney's headquarters will be main- 
tained at the residence of Arthur Gar- 
field Hays. Mason will serve with 
compensation and will make his head- 
quarters at the law offices of Weis- 
man, Allan & Spett. 

May Postpone Sailing 

Whether Darrow will now proceed 
with his announced plans of sailing 
for Europe late next week, or alter 
them, could not be ascertained yester- 
day. A statement on this was prom- 
ised by Mason for today. 

Mason and Brandt disclosed yester- 
day that an agreement to submit 
block booking and the right to buy 
disputes to an arbitration board of 
nine had been reached in Washing- 
ton during the Review Board hear- 
ings on the code but had been re- 
jected later by Will H. Hays, M. 
P. P. D. A. head. It was stated 
that, had the agreement been accepted, 
the I. T. O. A. and other independ- 
ent factions would have signed the 
code wherever assents had been with- 
held. 

The arbitration agreement was 
reached, it was said, during a meet- 
ing of Mason, Weisman and Abram 
F. Myers of Allied States with C. C. 
Pettijohn, M. P. P. D. A. general 
counsel. It provided for the submis- 
sion of any dispute on picture re- 
jections or inability to buy to a board 

i consisting of four members who were 
to be appointed by Hays, four by 
unanimous vote of Code Authority, 
or by Darrow in the event a unani- 

| mous vote could not be had, and 
a ninth to be named by the chairman 

! of the Federal Trade Commission. 

1 It was indicated yesterday that this 
or a similar agreement may be re- 
vived as one of the objectives of the 
Darrow-Mason-I. T. O. A. campaign 
against the code. 

Cites Attorney General 

Mason told the meeting that the 
head of the anti-trust division of the 
1 attorney general's office had re- 
j ported to the Review Board that 
| ''more anti-trust complaints were re- 
I ceived against the film industry than 
against any other industry in Amer- 
ica." 

"The code," Mason said, "permits 
the people who sell you the commodity 
' you deal in to tell you how to run 
your business. This goes on because 
eight people can tell 13,000 what to 
do." 

He said that the Review Board was 
swamped with complaints against the 
film code, but that it had no wit- 
nesses _ until Brandt appeared before 
it "with enough witnesses to keep 



Holidays Again 

The New York grievance 
board takes a holiday for the 
third time in a row next Tues- 
day, regular meeting day. 

No cases are on tap. 



us busy for days." He said that Dar- 
row had wanted to be present at yes- 
terday's meeting to thank Brandt and 
the I. T. O. A. for that. 

Brandt stated that Darrow was of- 
fering his services because "he knows 
the code to be unfair and because 
nothing has been done about it since 
the submission of the Review Board's 
report." 

Review Board Held 
Dead Before July 1 

Washington, July 5 — The Na- 
tional Recovery Review Board was 
abolished even before its three sur- 
viving members on July 1 announced 
that they would take a 10-day recess 
in order to give the President an 
opportunity to call them back to 
Washington if he desired. It was 
nade known today with publication 
by the White House of an executive 
order dated June 30. 

In the order the President ex- 
plained that "whereas said board has 
made three reports to the President 
in the exercise of its duties and 
functions and has substantially com- 
pleted the work for which it was 
established ; and whereas the chair- 
man and two other members of the 
board have resigned and any further 
investigations and reports would not 
be representative of the board as 
originally constituted, or serve to 
effectuate the purposes for which it 
was created," the board was to be 
dissolved on July 1. 

Approves Budget to 
Defend Code Bodies 

Washington, July 5 — The Na- 
tional Recovery Administration today 
approved an application of the Code 
Authority legal committee authoriz- 
ing it from time to time to incur 
expenses not exceeding $5,000 to en- 
gage counsel to defend in litigation 
the members of the clearance and 
zoning boards, grievance boards, Code 
Authority and the executive secretary. 
In no event, it is provided, shall the 
appropriation be construed to mean 
any addition to the administrative 
budget. 



St. Louis Appealing 

St. Louis, July 5. — Appeals have 
been taken from recent rulings of the 
clearance board in the cases of Ed F. 
Clarke, Majestic, Springfield, 111., ver- 
sus the Fox-Mississippi Corp., Fox 
Lincoln and Fox Tivoli, Springfield, 
111., and Karasotes Bros.' Strand and 
Senate, Springfield, 111., versus the 
Fox-Mississippi Corp., Fox Lincoln 
and Fox Tivoli, Springfield, 111. 



Hearing May Be July 23 

Washington, July S. — First pub- 
lic hearing on code amendments will 
probably be held July 23 by Divi- 
sion Administrator Sol A. Rosenblatt. 



To Meet Every 10 Days 

Cleveland, July 5. — The clearance 
board will hold its next meeting July 
10 and every 10 days thereafter in- 
stead of every Friday. 



Tussle Over 
Cleveland's 
Zoning Near 



(.Continued from page 1) 
57th day, the proposal would set them 
back to the 77th day, thereby affect- 
ing the Caneo, Carter, Strand, Mall, 
Standard and Roxy. 

Charging this a "discriminatory de- 
termination," W. M. Skirboll of the 
Cameo has entered a formal protest 
against this classification. Meyer 
Fischer, representing the Mall, has 
also filed a protest. 

This clause appears in a schedule 
developed following protest against the 
present agreement filed by the Hough 
Improvement Co. in which M. B. Hor- 
witz of the Washington Circuit is in- 
terested. 

Affecting 90 Greater Cleveland 
houses, the suggested zoning plan pro- 
vides 35 days for first run clearance, 
which is the same as the old schedule. 
The board, however, conceded to the 
request of Hough Improvement by ad- 
vancing the availability date on sec- 
ond run pictures whenever the circuits 
advanced their second run dates in 
their own second run houses. 

Houses charging 20 per cent eve- 
ning adult admission prices would get 
pictures 49 days following the com- 
pletion of the first run, as against the 
old schedule of 57 days clearance. 

Fifteen-cent houses would get their 
pictures 77 days after completion of 
the first run, as against 63 days in the 
old schedule. Ten-cent houses will get 
pictures on the 150th day as against 
100 days now. Clearance for houses 
playing double features is proposed at 
365 days after the advertised national 
release date of pictures. Under the 
old schedule of 57 days' clearance. 
100 days after the conclusion of the 
local first run. 

Other terms of the schedule are that 
20-cent houses are to have 70 days' 
clearance over 10-cent houses, and 15- 
cent houses shall have 45 days' clear- 
ance over 10-cent houses. 



Chicago Overbuying 
Case Is An Enigma 

(Continued from pane 1) 

Villas figures in the triangle as a house 
with which Schoenstadt had bought 
split selective programs. 

After the board's decision it was dis- 
covered that Universal and Paramount 
could not release clear to Bartelstein 
their share of seven and 10 pictures, 
respectively, because of a contract with 
the Villas, which was not covered in 
the Schoenstadt split. 

When the board learned that this 
was not brought out at the hearings 
the case was reopened, and a new de- 
termination, apparently quite ignoring 
the pictures awarded Bartelstein pre- 
viously was rendered. This decision 
determines that while the Palace, hav- 
ing selective contracts, is in a position 
to deprive the Annette of bookings, the 
Palace is directed to select its pictures 
and notify distributors not less than 
14 days in advance of the first day 
of the week availability of the Palace. 

And that's where the case stands, 
pending filing of an appeal by Bartel- 
stein. The history of the case is being 
forwarded to John C. Flinn. 



Buying Co-op 
Revamps with 
A New Entity 

(Continued from paqe 1) 

"in the shade of the old apple tree," 
according to Ray Moon, general man- 
ager of the new, as well as of the 
old, corporation. 

"In the past," Moon said, "certain 
factions have raised a question con- 
cerning our right to exist. Formation 
of the new company removes all pos- 
sible doubt, as the law of 1931, which 
has been tested in the Supreme Court 
and upheld, completely protects us." 

Former officers of Mid-States have 
been elected in like capacities. They 
are : James Robertson, president ; Fred 
DeLodder, vice-president ; Barney Kil- 
bride, secretary ; Frank Wetsman, 
treasurer, and Ray Moon, general 
manager. All former members of Mid- 
States retain their membership in the 
new combine. 

Moon said that the Sam Brown cir- 
cuit of houses had joined, as well as 
the Eastown, just taken over by Lou 
Wisper. A $60,000 suit, which pro- 
vides for a triple penalty of $180,000, 
filed in Federal court some months 
ago by Brown, will be dropped, ac- 
cording to Moon. The suit charged 
restraint of trade, citing specifically 
the case of Brown's Oriole being un- 
able to get product in competition with 
Wetsman's Linwood-LaSalle. 

Under the new setup, Moon con- 
tinued, the new combine will have 
complete control of buying and book- 
ing for its members, Mid-States hav- 
ing merely booked film after exhibi- 
tor-members had contracted for it. The 
new company will be responsible for 
payment of film bills as well as book- 
ing and buying for the houses. 

Expect 24 Appeals 
Ready by Thursday 

With eight cases already reviewed, 
Campi code appeal committees expect 
to have at least 24 appeal recommen- 
dations by next Thursday when Code 
Authority convenes. 

Four appeals were discussed Mon- 
day and a like number yesterday. 
With R. H. Cochrane, Robert Wolff 
and J. Louis Geller sitting, the fol- 
lowing appeals were heard : 

S. Hochstim, Star, Hudson, N. Y., 
against Hen-Wil-Hen Corp., same city, on 
overbuying-. The plaintiff appeared in per- 
son and William Frieder acted for the de- 
fendant. 

W. E. Eagen represented the Camden 
Drive-in Theatre, Inc., Camden, N. J., 
against RKO for failure to deliver con- 
tracted films. Willard Younger acted for 
RKO. 

Fred Lind, Grand, Littleton, Colo., 
against Thomas A. Sullivan, Gothic, Engle- 
wood, Colo., on reduced admissions. 

M. Ewing, Amus-U Theatre, LaHarpe, 
111., against Andrew L. Hainline, Illinois 
Theatre, Macomb, 111., on clearance and 
zoning. 

Chicago FTC Probe 
Going to Washington 

(Continued from page 1) 
in Washington, some time within the 
next five weeks, according to William 
F. Dinnen, local Federal Trade Com- 
mission agent. Dinnen declared there 
would be no letup in the investigation 
and the full report will go to Wash- 
ington on its completion with data re- 
quested from the home film offices. 



^ WARNER BRO 



OS.' ROYAL BLUSH 



oreA 



DE L RIO 

Du BARRY 

VERREE TEASDALE • VICTOR JORY • REGINALD 
OWEN • OSGOOD PERKINS • And 17 Other 
Featured Stars . . . . Directed by William Dieterle 

Vitagroph, Inc , Distributors 



6 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Friday, July 6, 1934 



Want Undesirable Films Out 

100%, Not Merely Censored 

Columbus, O., July 5. — A checkup by Motion Picture Daily 
here reveals that 300 petitions bearing signatures of 25,000 Ohioans 
asking for complete rejection of undesirable pictures, not merely 
deletions, have been received by Dr. Beverly O. Skinner, state 
director of education, and ex-officio of the state censor board. 
Forty-six hundred petitions were circulated by the Ohio Council 
of Churches to pastors throughout the state. 

In a letter addressed to Skinner by W. J. Powell, operating the 
Lonet, at Wellington, O., the town's only house, he appeals, as "a 
small town exhibitor, to take such action as will result in complete 
rejection of off-color and vicious pictures." 

"My patrons now are picture-conscious," Powell writes, "and are 
looking for bad spots in every film. It is an absolute fact that the 
kind of pictures produced during the past several years has driven 
away from my theatre a constant clean-minded patronage." 

He complained that under block booking he is unable to shelve 
the pictures which he knows in advance his patrons will 
disapprove. 



Lima, O., July 5. — Injecting the political angle into the situation, 
John A. Elden, Cleveland, seeking Republican nomination for gov- 
ernor, told a meeting sponsored by the Citizens' Non-Partisan 
League here, that the state board of censors had pitifully failed 
to clean up films in Ohio. "More than that," he charged, "the 
Democratic party has been responsible for greatly increasing the 
expenditures of the censor board." 



Seeks Accord on Boycott; 
Delaware Talks Shutdown 



Pledge Cards 
Circulating 
In K.C. Now 



Kansas City, July 5— Signing of 
Legion of Decency pledges is under 
way in 125 Catholic churches in the 
Kansas City diocese following the 
reading at all services of a pastoral 
letter by Bishop Thomas F. Lillis. 
Approximately 500 cards were signed 
at the Cathedral of the Immaculate 
Conception. A report on the total 
number of signatures will be made 
later. 

Copies of the Catholic Register, of- 
ficial diocese publication, carrying the 
"decency pledge" and the bishop's mes- 
sage in full and devoting much space 
to the campaign in general, were dis- 
tributed at the doors of the churches. 

Calls Priests to Conference 

Prior to ordering the pastoral letter 
read, Bishop Lillis called into confer- 
ence all priests in Kansas City and 
Independence, Mo., together with 
priests representing the larger par- 
ishes in Springfield, Sedalia, Boonville, 
Marshall and Joplin, Mo. The bishop 
explained the part the Catholics are 
taking in the film crusade. He em- 
phasized there was "no reform in this 
move," the sole purpose being "clean 
plays in the playhouses of America," 
he said. 

In his message to the communicants, 
Bishop Lillis branded the "sex maga- 
zines" and 'sensational publications of 
; the "confessions" type as offenders 
'against morals and decency, and de- 
scribed- them as by-products of "the 
salacious motion pictures." 

'%have nothing but praise for the 
metropolitan press, however," con- 
tinued the bishop. "The large news- 
papers of this country have moral 
standards and they keep them. Much 
has been done by the metropolitan pa- 
pers to keep down the flood of dirty 
motion pictures and the filthy maga- 
zines.'^, .. lew. . i ■ 
Waging Long Fight 

Bishop Lillis for years has been 
campaigning against indecencies on 
the scVeen and stage and in the sen- 
sational magazines available at the 
newsstands. In his recent report to 
the Pope, the bishop dwelt on the 
"encroachment of indecency" from 
these sources. 

Bishop Lillis charged that "less than 
a dozen magnates actually control" 
the industry and blamed them "for this 
moral depravity." He said they vio- 
lated their pledges to observe the pro- 
duction code. 

A resolution urging their members 
to boycott indecent films has been 
adopted by ministers of the Kansas 
City district Methodist Episcopal 
church, South, at a meeting here. The 
resolution states : 

"The ministers of the Kansas City dis- 
trict, M. E. Church, South( realizing that 
a stream of indecency is flowing through 
the picture shows to the detriment of the 
ideals and morals of a large number of 
the people, join with other groups of 
churches and social welfare groups in ut- 
terly condemning this lewd and filthy out- 
flow. We ask our people to join in refus- 
ing to patronize such shows. We assure 
the producers of our interest in wholesome 
productions, but our patience is exhausted 
by the present low order of production." 



(Continued from page 1) 

president of the Independent M. P. T. 
O. of Delaware and the Eastern Shore 
of Maryland, in which group there 
are 46 houses, said members of the as- 
sociation recently filed a formal pro- 
test with the producers, informing 
them that they would have to do 
something to "clean up" the films be- 
cause the boycott against the alleged 
indecent movies was being felt by 
them. 

"Unless something is done," De- 
Fiore said, "We will be compelled to 
close most of the theatres in this state 
and on the Eastern Shore of Mary- 
land. While the church people may 
be right to some degree in their pro- 
tests, they are killing our investments 
in our theatres. We, the theatre 
owners, are helpless in the matter be- 
cause we have no say in the selection 
of the films that are shown in our the- 
atres. We are- compelled under our 
contracts to show the pictures the pro- 
ducers send us. 

Finds Boycott Felt 

"The boycott in this city and State 
and on the Eastern Shore has been 
severe in spots and now it is being felt 
all down the line. The people are just 
not going to the movies." He said 
the local independents are awaiting 
word from the M. P. T. O. A. in 
Philadelphia and as soon as they issue 
any closing orders he will call a spe- 
cial meeting of his group here to de- 
cide on what action they shall take. 

Warner theatre men in this city 
stated that they had received no word 
that the houses would close within two 
weeks and knew nothing about the 
closing. It was further stated that the 
order would not affect Wilmington 
and that, so far as the boycott was 
concerned, it was not felt by the War- 
ners here. 

Loew's Parkway announced that it 
(Continued on page 11) 



(Continued from page 1) 

verification of Philadelphia reports 
that Warners would close all of their 
theatres in the territory because of 
the boycott. Commenting on the re- 
ports Tuesday, Bernhard said at that 
time that nothing definite had been 
decided in this respect. Independent 
exhibitors in the territory have de- 
clared that they stand ready to follow 
Warners' lead in closing houses 
throughout the entire Eastern Penn- 
sylvania, Southern New Jersey and 
Delaware territory. 

The Bernhard statement says that 
the Stanley-Warner circuit "has felt 
compelled to notify its employes and 
the various firms with which it does 
business that a general closing of our 
theatres may be forced upon us within 
the next two weeks." 

Forced to Take Step 

"We have been driven to this step," 
the statement continues, "by the mani- 
fest possibilities of the boycott en- 
dorsed by Cardinal Dougherty, Arch- 
bishop of Philadelphia. That boycott 
has not discriminated between pictures 
supposed to merit approval and others' 
supposed to merit condemnation; it is 
directed against motion picture thea- 
tres as such. 

"The following paragraph is from 
a letter which I wrote on July 5 to 
His Eminence, Cardinal Dougherty : 

" 'Motion picture theatres, in com- 
mon with other enterprises, have suf- 
fered greatly during the depression. 
It has been a great effort to maintain 
and operate theatres in your diocese, 
which give employment to upwards of 
900 people. In spite of the great de- 
cline in theatre receipts during the 
past years, but in line with President 
Roosevelt's policy, we have retained 
the maximum number of employes 
and are paying- them .maximum com- 

(Continued OH'page 11) 



Church Drive 
Continues to 
Upset Nation 

Philadelphia, July 5 — With the 
boycott instituted by Cardinal Dough- 
erty endorsed by the Pope and no 
change in the stand assumed by the 
former in sight, the local situation 
continued upset today. 

Warners and the M^P.T.O.A. are 
apparently standing by their guns and 
their decision to darken all of their 
theatres unless the boycott at large is 
lifted in favor of church displeasure 
directed at films deemed objectionable. 
The Catholic Church, likewise, gave 
no indication today of any switch in 
its decision. 

The Independent Exhibitors Pro- 
tective Ass'n, new exhibitor unit not 
affiliated with the M.P.T.O.A., today 
declared it had "no intention of co- 
operating in protests against the atti- 
tude of churches which have voiced 
objections to improper films." Morris 
Wax, chairman of its board of man- 
agers, declared his association "desires 
to bring about a cleansing of pic- 
tures." At the same time, he pleaded 
against an "indiscriminate blanket 
boycott of all pictures" on the ground 
such action is affecting "many innocent 
people who have nothing to do with 
production of the films and who have 
shown only clean, decent pictures." 



Says Catholic Campaign 
Aims at Duals' Death 

Buffalo, July 5. — Elimination of 
double features, "so prominent in 
neighborhood houses," is a major ob- 
jective in the Legion of Decency cam- 
paign for better films, Rev. Alfred 
J. Barrett, S.J., moderator of the 
Student Sodality Area Conference, told 
the Holy Family Church sodality 
here. 

Father Barrett quoted remarks of 
his uncle, Arnedee J. Van Beuren, pro- 
ducer for RKO, made at the recent 
convention in Chicago. Father Bar- 
rett has a brother who is an actor and 
a brother and sister in distribution. 



Charges "Evil" Films 
Are Cause of Crime 

Niagara Falls, N. Y., July 5. — 
"Evil" pictures are a crime cause, 
Charles H. Turtle, former Federal 
attorney for the Southern District of 
New York and 1930 Republican can- 
didate for governor, declared at the 
ninth annual meeting of the Fed- 
eration of Bar Ass'ns of Western New 
York here. He lauded the movement 
of Catholic, Protestant and Jewish 
denominations for cleaner pictures. 



Criticizes Movement 
To Boycott Theatres 

Columbus, O., July 5. — Criticizing 
the movement to boycott theatres in an 
effort to uplift film standards, Rev. 
Otto Ebert, of the Christ Lutheran 
Church, in a pastoral statement just 
released, says : 

"I do not like the spirit of the boycott. 
I consider it to be un-American, although 
its application seems to be truly demo- 
cratic. If the League of Decency can 
control so large a number of cinemagoers 
that its voice will be heard in the box- 
(Continued on page 11) 



COLUMN A 
MARCHES ON 



~w 



48 



FEATURE 
PRODUCTIONS 

through 

1934 1935 



*ouA need^L and deAHeL 
and out aiwU. and hop 
aAe one and ihe Aame- 
GOOD PICTURES ... ~~We oik /oA 
you^ continued fadh and 
con-fidence in Columbia. 

Wi/h d WE MUST SUCCEED -TOGETHER 





2 FRANK CAP RA 
PRODUCTIONS 
THE FIRST OF WHICH WILL BE 

BROADWAY BILL 

featuring WARNER BAXTER and MYRNA LOY 

with Lynn Overman, Raymond Walburn, Clarence Muse, Doug- 
las Dumbrille. By Robert Riskin, from "Strictly Confidential," by 
Mark Hellinger. 



& Extended Run Special. 



GRACE MOORE in ONE NIGHT of LOVE 

Season's first big smash hit, with Tullio Carminati, Lyle Talbot, Mona Barrie. 
Story by Dorothy Speare and Charles Beahan. Screen play by S. K. Lauren, 
James Gow and Edmund North. Directed by Victor Schertzinger. Acclaimed 
by all critics. 



Critics from coast to coast have hailed this best-selling novel of L A. R. Wylie's 
as one of the most delightful heart- warming stories of the year! It promises to be 
a knock-out as a picture! 



An EDWARD G. ROBINSON Production 

Directed by Howard Hawks 

A great box-office star! A great box-office director! Their combination will result 
in one of the ten best pictures of the year! You can look forward to something 
extraordinary in motion picture triumphs. 

PARTY WIRE 

Now a best-selling novel — soon a big money picture! It captured the hearts of 
thousands and .the unstinted praise of reviewers everywhere! By Bruce 
Manning. 




A 
1 





COLUMBM 



An Edmund LOWI 

Two swashbuckling he-men in a i 
to fight — with each other; and torn 



LAD^ 

A drama of dangerous romance ir 
destined to head this picture stra:c 



BORIS 

THE BLACI 

They Love to Hate— | 
of thrill picture big box-< 



su 

GENE RAYMOND and ANN SOTH 
greater laurels to their enormousf] 



THE MILL! 

A vivid, powerful, unforgetable d| 
From the story by Melville Baker - 



JACK HOLT in 
and 2 othe: 

A powerful, dramatic vehicle for. 
EDMUND LOWE in another prot 





RE 



-V J 

AKF 



orating honeympc 
villas to Park Avenue boudoirs c: 



EI< 

The celebrated international stae 
at the Globe Theatre and at the , 
by Percy G, Mandley. 



CARNIVAL 



Beautiful, kaleidoscopic, colorful — this dramatic romance is set against ever- 
fascinating backgrounds. A tense story of tangled lives by Robert Riskin, scen- 
arist of "Lady For A Day' and "It Happened One Night." , - - 



THE GIRL FRIEND 

A musical extravaganza featuring. JACK HALEY and LUPE V'ELEZ, by Amer- 
ica's musical comedy .kings.' .Book, music and lyrics by Herbert Fields, Richard 
Rodgers, Loreni Hart— authors and composers of "The Connecticut Yankee" 
and "Hit the Deck," ' 



ONCE Li 

It will forever capture audiences s * 
ing laughter and tears in a tensej ; 
King. 

I 



ieA jf) ox- (yfjice CahA4A44*q.. 



k\ GROUP 



z HOLT Production 

iotous story of two pals who loved 
-each other's sweethearts! 



RlREI 




s age. with a brilliant cast that is 
1 box-office returns! 



L A 

f ' 



SPRING 3100 

From the Broadway play by Argyll Campbell, produced with great success at 
the Little Theatre, New York. On the screen, its swift action and tense drama will 
find wider popular appeal! 



MAN PROOF 

Love-proof, thrill-proof, kiss-proof! Many men tried to break down the wall of 
her resistance to love — but failed! Then one man imprisoned her heart forever! 



MURDER ISLAND 

A thrilling, swiftly-paced adventure of a young aviatrix whose plane, forced 
down on an uncharted island, is captured by bandits. From the story by Leland 
Jamieson. 




)FF in 
MYSTERY 

of "Frankenstein" who made a 
powerful mystery romance. 



E 




•pacecl romanc 
a the play by Ralph Murphy. 



HE GODS 

nge destinies and stranger loves, 
rkland. 



EPTHS BELOW 
ig vehicles 

it star. He will also co-star with 




A 




MISTAKEN IDENTITY 

'The all-engrossing story of a girl who lived another woman's life, endured 
many heartaches and sought passionately to win the romance which washers 
alone. - 



WHITE LIES 

You know her! You've seen her in the tabloids! You've heard her name whis- 
pered! Fast, modern, "aero-dynamic" romance with a dangerous tug at your 
emotions! 



LADY OF NEW YORK 

Beautiful, smart, sophisticated — she matched wits and crossed hearts in the 
world's greatest love mart — New York — where the men love to play and pay! 



PRIVATE PROPERTY 

inted at! Whispered about! Captive in a cage of luxury! The world knew her 
story but none dared tell the truth! A breath-taker that will be talked about 
wherever played! 




R TWO 

ch speeds , its way from Riviera 
■ speed limit! 



UNKNOWN WOMAN 

Suspense and surprising situations follow each other with reckless rapidity in 
this exotic creature's amazing career! The climax strikes a new note of high- 
pitched drama aimed at every woman's heart! • 



!LS 

uich ran for one year in London 
be in New York. From the play 



A 




$25 AN HOUR 

From the outstanding Broadway success which played to exceptional business 
at the Masgue Theatre, New York. A gay, saucy, delightful romance by Gladys 
Unger and Ley la Georgi. 



I CONFESS 

The fascinating story of a woman who bared her heart to the world! Every 
page is torn from her very soul and out of it emerges a story that will pierce 
the heart of every man and woman! 



8 PICTURES to be designated 

Columbia will produce 8 other feature pictures not identified on these pages." 
This will permit the company from time to time to select such subjects and 
materials of a timely nature as may become available. 



JLEMAN 

zes of mounting surprises — blend- 
;ama. From the' story by Bradley 



i 



ITTUDE 

I v r hen it played all over the coun- 
n Theatre, New Yoik. By Frank 





R i des Uqa i* 



OUTDOOR 

FEATURES 



The gallant, romantic, thrilling ace of the saddle in a series of exciting, whirlwind 
dramas that spell box-office success and make him the undeniable King of the Outdoors. 




COLUMBIASSHORTATTIMCTIONS 



1 COLOR RHAPSODIES A 

m A riot of startling color that is topped only by the riotous M 
' blend of comedy and music. Will add a delightful dash to ^ 
your program! Produced by Charles Mintz. 


* The SPICE of LIFE 

Over one million weekly readers of the Uterary Digest are 
ready-made fans for this new, delightful and hilarious reel 
of the world's humor . Produced by Mentone Productions, Inc. 


SCRAPPY a 

m More theatres than ever before are booking these lively, 4m 
f hilarious and joyous short feature hits. Gilt-edged proof of ^ 
their popularity. Produced by Charles Mintz. 


^ KRAZY KAT 

More than ten million people enjoy "Krazy Kat" daily in 
newspapers all over the country. George Herriman's 
famous cartoon strip whets their appetites for "Krazy's" 
^ / screen antics! Produced by Charles Mintz. 


LIFE'S LAST LAUGHS " 

Every epitaph a sign for roars! Will delight audiences and 
. prove talk of your show. Received overwhelming fan recep- 
tion when first shown at Radio City Music Hall! Produced 
by C. S. Clancy. A 


k WORLD of SPORTS 

Up-to-the-minute sport thrills for all screen fans! Daring, 
y breath-taking, keyed to the nth degree of heart-pounding 
excitement! 


LAUGHING with MEDBURY 




Medbury laughs at the world and the world laughs with 
him! There's a laugh in every landscape of this cock-eyed 
world with this famous commentator! Produced by Walter 
Putter. 


^ Hollywood through a keyhole! The fan magazine of the 1 

W screen! Harriet Parsons, roving reporter, sees all and tells 
all about how the stars act when not acting. 


i 

26 stored 2 REEL COMEDIES 

HARRY LANGDON - ANDY CLYDE - LEON ERROL - WALTER CATLETT 

and the 3 STOOGES 

The finest two -reel comedies you've ever played — featuring an aggregation of 
outstanding comedians! They're not merely an addition to your 

program — they're a whole show in themselves 1 ^tedHKP 


Columbia Marches On Through 1934-1935/ 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Friday, July 6, 1934 



Church Drive 
Continues to 
Upset Nation 



(Continued from page 6) 
office, its argument is bound to be most 
effective. A study of audiences, how- 
ever, is anything but reassuring, and it 
requires no prophet to foretell that any 
picture which is questioned will be a 
near sellout when shown." 

Simultaneously, Rev. Henry Hoes- 
man, of the Hope Lutheran Church, 
issued a statement along practically 
similar lines, although directing his 
attack more against Will Hays. 



Agrees Striking at 
B.O. Is the Only Way 

Cincinnati, July 5. — "Archbishop 
McNicholas has rightly seen the fu- 
tility of anything short of a militant 
organization of those who want re- 
form," declared Rev. Carl H. Olson, 
pastor of the First Universalist 
Church here, in a talk to his congre- 
gation on "Our Movies and Our 
Morals." 

"The Legion of Decency threatens to 
strike at the only heart apparent in the 
motion picture business — the box office. 

"The splendid organization of the Roman 
Catholic Church makes this new movement 
more effective than any resolution or word 
of protest which any other group could 
make. Protestant and Jewish leaders 
and groups have praised the venture, but 
they should go farther." 

Washington Protestants 
Join Catholic Movement 

Washington, July 5. — Support of 
the Legion of Decency campaign 
swings into line from an unsuspected 
quarter with the Washington diocese 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church 
declaring it would join the Catholic 
movement actively. 

Ohio Christian Endeavor 
Meeting Approves Drive 

New Philadelphia, O., July 5. — 
For the first time in Ohio Christian 
Endeavor history an appeal made by a 
Protestant clergyman for support of 
a Catholic movement was endorsed 
and embodied in resolutions for cleaner 
films adopted at the closing session 
here of the State Christian Endeavor 
convention. 

Resolutions carried out sentiments 



Substitution 

Chicago, July 5. — Sally 
Rand, whose fan dance at the 
Fair last year, started what 
became a stage vogue that 
grew until it fanned both 
coasts, made a reappearance 
at her old stamping ground 
today substituting a bubble 
for a fan. 

Blue lights helped create 
the illusion Sally was danc- 
ing in the bubble, when as a 
matter of fact, she was nes- 
tling behind it. Fair officials 
regarded her as "essentially 
covered." 

Fan in 1933. Bubble, no 
fan, in 1934. Local specula- 
tion centers around what it 
will be if the Fair reopens 
next year. 



of Rev. Vere W. Abbey, Christian 
Endeavor missionary secretary for 
India, Burma and Ceylon. "Movies 
too rotten to be shown in Ohio are 
shipped to India," he said, "where 
natives pack the theatres to see what 
Christian America's women look like 
undressed." 



Presbyterian Confab 
Endorses Film Drive 

Oxford, O., July 5. — Protestantism 
joined religious sects that have joined 
Roman Catholics in their campaign for 
"clean" motion pictures here as the 
76th general assembly of the United 
Presbyterian Church endorsed the 
move shortly before adjournment. 

Approval of the position by the 
Catholic Church through its "League 
of Decency" followed closely similar 
aation by the Federal Council of 
Churches of Christ in America, other 
denominational meetings last week in 
Wooster, the east and individual ex- 
pressions from Jewish leaders. 



See NEA Swing to 
Crusade Against Films 

Washington, July 5 — The Na- 
tional Education Ass'n on Friday will 
vote on resolutions now pending 
before the resolutions committee of 
the organization, including one holding 
that motion pictures are one of the 
most important means of education 
and proposing that the NEA join 
with other organizations in demand- 
ing a high type of picture and in the 
movement to clean up the screen. 

The resolution condemns pictures 
which threaten the integrity of the 
American home and American insti- 
tutions, glorify lawlessness and con- 
tribute to child delinquency. Block 
booking is held in the resolution to be 
largely responsible for the "unsavory 
character" of present film entertain- 
ment and is condemned without re- 
serve. 



Gets Come-Back Chance 

Hollywood, July 5. — Clara Kimball 
Young, once a big name in pictures, 
has been signed to a one-picture deal 
with options by Sol Lesser and will 
play the role of Chandu's sister in the 
serial, "The Return of Chandu," foi 
Principal. 



(Continued from page 6) 

did not contemplate closing and that 
the boycott has not had any effect on 
the attendance here. 

There has been no boycott ordered 
in the Catholic diocese of Wilmington 
such as those issued in the archdiocese 
of Philadelphia. The Wilmington dio- 
cese is in the Baltimore archdiocese 
and consequently the boycott at Phila- 
delphia does not affect the Catholics in 
this city and state. 



Western Series Sold 

Bud 'n' Ben Pictures Corp. has sold 
its series of 12 three-reel westerns to 
F. C. Pictures of Buffalo for Upper 
New York and to Metropolitan Pic- 
tures of Seattle for Washington, Ore- 
gon and Montana. 



Paramount Regional 
On; Last of Series 



With talks by George Schaefer, J. 
J. Unger and Milt Kusell highlight- 
ing the session, the last of Para- 
mount's two-day regionals got under 
way yesterday at the Waldorf As- 
toria. Unger presided. 

Product and the flexible sales pol- 
icy also were discussed in a review 
of the national sales meet which was 
held recently on the coast. 

Today's session will be devoted to 
individual district meetings with 
Unger slated to talk to salesmen, 
bookers, assistant bookers and branch 
heads from Boston, Portland and 
New Haven. Kusell will gather his 
men from Albany, Buffalo, New Jer- 
sey, New York and Brooklyn and 
talk to them. About 65 are in at- 
tendance. 



Frankwyn Co. Adds 
2 More Stage Plays 

Two additional legitimate produc- 
tions have been added to the Frank- 
wyn schedule for the coming season, 
Harold B. Franklin said yesterday. 
They are "Lady Jane," with Frances 
Starr, scheduled for a try-out opening 
at Hartford on Labor Day, and a 
musical starring Lucien Boyer, French 
music hall star, set to open at the 
Lyceum here, October 15. 

Charles B. Cochran, London pro- 
ducer, who is associated with Frank- 
lin and Arch Selwyn in the produc- 
tion venture, is due here next month 
to prepare for the openings. 



May Wipe Out Weak 
Issues on 'Changes 

(Continued from page 1) 

cities throughout the nation is antici- 
pated here as one of the early acts of 
the Securities and Exchange Com- 
mission, of which Joseph P. Kennedy 
is chairman. 

The anticipated action, however, is 
not expected to apply particularly to 
the New York Stock Exchange, where 
restrictions have been tightened volun- 
tarily in recent months. 



(Continued from page 6) 

pensation commensurate with the 
services performed by them.' 

"We have also offered to Cardinal 
Dougherty the use of 'a suitable pro- 
jection room where pictures may be 
viewed before they are released in our 
theatres. This preview would enable 
you to prepare a "Black and White 
List" which could serve as further 
protection for your flock.' " 

"The Philadelphia archdiocese is the 
only territory in the United States 
where a boycott has been proclaimed 
against a legally conducted business 
which affords widespread employment 
and which has offered every reason- 
able compromise to protect the sensi- 
bilities of those sections of the public 
that may feel themselves to be in 
need of such protection," Bernhard's 
statement concludes. 



Variety Club 
Chatter 



Washington, July 5. — The first 
of the weekly luncheons of Tent No. 
11 was held Sunday in the club head- 
quarters in the Willard Hotel. 

Kings for the day were Guy 
Wonders and William K. Saxton. 

Off the main room, which is gaily 
decorated with paneled borders of 
troubadours and circus parades, is an 
English tap room. 

The ladies' reception room is white 
and blue. 

Among those attending were: Alan 
J. Bachrach, Samuel Beck, Cas- 
ter T. Barron, Rudolph Berger, 
Louis Bernheimer, Herman A. 
Blum, Phil Bobys, Louis A. Brown, 
Harry S. Brown, Nat B. Browne, 
A. Julian Brylawski, James A. 
Burns, Walter E. Cersley, J. Wil- 
liam Cleveland, George A. Crouch, 
Robert Etris, William C. Ewing, 
John E. Firnkoess, William R. 
Fischer, Lauritz C. Garman, 
George J. Gill, Nat Glasser, Rob- 
ert M. Grace, Edward Jacobs, 
Charles Kranz, Frank LaFalce, 
A. E. Lichtman, Harry E. Loh- 
meyer, Sidney B. Lust, Joseph 
Makover, Hardie Meakin, Charles 
E. McGowan, Charles H. Olive, 
James A. Pratt, Orangelo J. Ratto, 
Daniel J. Reynolds, J. Louis Rome, 
James W. Root, Frank J. Skully, 
Robert Smeltzer, Nathan A. Stie- 
fel, Isaac Weinberg, Harold A. 
Weinberger, Samuel N. Wheeler, 
William E. S. Wilcox, Frededick J. 
Thomas, Frank M. Boucher, Don 
Craig, Philip Ershler, and Andrew 
R. Kelley. 

The following committees have been 
selected by the board of governors : 

Finance — Sam A. Galanty, Joseph P. 
Morgan, and J. Louis Rome. 

Executive — Rudolph Berger, Harry 
Hunter, Sam Wheeler, Carter T. Bar- 
ron, Charles Kranz. 

Membership — Sam Wheeler, chairman; 
Harry S. Brown, Herman A. Blum, A. 
E. Lichtman, Alan J. Bachrach, Frank 
Durkee, Louis Gaertner. 

Publicity — Harry Hunter, chairman; 
Hardie Meakin, Frank LaFalce, Lou 
Brown. 

Entertainment — Carter T. Barron, chair- 
man; Guy Wonders, Isadore M. Rappa- 
port, Leonard B. Schloss, William K. 
Saxton, Nathan A. Stiefel, James J. 
Lake. 

Ways and Means — A. Julian Brylawski, 
chairman; Robert J. Folliard, Hunter 
Perry, Louis Bernheimer, J. Louis 
Rome, Edward Jacobs, Sidney B. Lust. 

Transportation — Joseph P. Morgan, 
chairman: Charles E. McGown, Walter 
E. Cersley, J. William Cleveland, 
George A. Crouch, Joseph Makover, 
Charles E. Nolte. 

House — Rudolph Berger, chairman; 
Charles E. Schulman, Harry E. Loh- 
meyer, Robert Smeltzer, Charles 
Kranz, Nat Glasser, Edward Heiber. 

Sports — Sam A. Galanty, chairman; 
Hrrry S. Brown, James A. Pratt, An- 
drew R. Kelley, Don Craig. 



Six Years Later 

Omaha, July 5. — A small 
town exhibitor in Iowa, who 
in 1928 received a notation 
from the local Warner ex- 
change that he had $3.90 
credit on the books and urged 
him to apply it on future 
rentals, has just replied to 
the letter. He attached the 
faded and wrinkled letter to 
a fresh one, saying he wanted 
the money in cash since he 
decided to go out of business. 



Seeks Accord on Boycott; 
Delaware Talks Shutdown 



WILL 
ROGERS 

HANDY ANDY 

with 

PEGGY WOOD 

CONCH ITA MONTENEGRO 
MARY CARLISLE 
R O G E R IMHOF 
ROBERT TAYLOR 

Produced by SoJ M. Wurtzef 

Based on play "Merry Andrew" by Lewis Beach. 
Screen play by William Conselman and 
Henry Johnson. Adaptation by Kubec Glasmon. 

Directed by David Butler 



and you'll know what 
many exhibitors have 
SEEN for themselves! 




"Sure-fire attraction for millions. There is every 
reason to anticipate 'David Harum' business/' 

— Motion Picture Herald 

Among the most enjoyable of Will Rogers' pictures 
...particularly strong on comedy." —Film Daily 



Keeps the laughs rolling with gags and situations. 

—Variety Daily 



Down-to-earth, wholesome, homespun . . . with 
many laughs. Fast on the heels of 'David Harum'." 

— M otion Picture Daily 



nether ^ 
hit from 



seas< 



14 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Friday, July 6, 1934 



66 



Marker" Gets 
Good $6,500, 
Minneapolis 



Minneapolis, July 5. — "Little Miss 
Marker" chalked up a fine $6,500 at 
the State and was shifted to the Cen 
tury. 

"Dr. Monica" was strong at the 
Minnesota with a take of $8,000. The 
heat was near a record. 

Minneapolis' six theatres usually 
making total grosses of $26,000 got 
$27,000, while St. Paul's four, which 
average $14,000, took $15,000. 

Estimated takings: 

Minneapolis 
Week Ending June 28: 

"MANY HAPPY RETURNS" (Para.) 

CENTURY— (1,650), 2Sc-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $3,500. (Average, $4,000) 

"HOLLYWOOD PARTY" (M-G-M) 
LYRIC-0,239), 20c-25c, 7 days. Gross: 
$1,500. (Average, $1,500) 

"DR MONICA" (Warners) 
MINNESOTA— (4,000), 25c-50c, 7 days. 
Gross: $8,000. (Average, $7,500) 

Week Ending June 29: 
"LIFE OF VERGIE WINTERS" (Radio) 

R.KO ORPHEUM— (2,900), 25c-50c, 7 days. 
Gross: $5,500 (Average, $5,500) 

"LITTLE MISS MARKER" (Para.) 

STATE— (2,300), 25c-40c, 7 days. Gross: 
$6,500. (Average, $5,500) 

"CATHERINE, THE GREAT" (U. A.) 

WORLD— (400), 25c-75c, 7 days, 5th week. 
Gross: $2,000. (Average, $2,000) 

St. Paul: 
Week Ending June 29: 

"MANHATTAN MELODRAMA" (M-G-M) 

PARAMOUNT — (2,300), 25c-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $5,500. (Average, $5,500) 

"HOLLYWOOD PARTY" (M-G-M) 
RIVIERA— (1,200), 25c-40c, 4 days. Gross: 
$2,200. (Average for the week, $3,500) 
"SUCH WOMEN ARE DANGEROUS" 
(Fox) 

RIVIERA— (1,200), 25c-40c, 3 days. Gross: 
$1,500. (Average for the week, $3,500) 
"CIRCUS CLOWN" (F. N.) 

RKO ORPHEUM— (2,600), 20c-40c, 4 days. 
Gross: $2,500. (Average for the week, 
$4,000) 

"MURDER ON THE BLACKBOARD" 
(Radio) 

RKO ORPHEUM— (2,600), 20c-40c, 3 days. 
Gross: $2,000. (Average for week, $4,000) 
"UPPER WORLD" (Warners) 

TOWER— (1.000), 15c-25c, 4 days. Gross: 
$800. (Average, $800) 

"MERRY WIVES OF RENO" (Warners) 

TOWER— (1,000). 15c-25c, 3 days. Gross: 
$700. (Average, $700) 



"Affairs," Fight 
Indianapolis Wow 

Indianapolis, July 5.— "Affairs of 
a Gentleman" with the Baer-Carnera 
fight cracked a straight film policy 
record at the Lyric last week with 
$9,000. 

"Dr. Monica" had a par $3,500 at 
the Circle and "Operator 13" was also 
even up with $4,000 at the Palace. 

Total first run business was $18,500. 
Average is $10,000 without the Lyric. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing June 30 : 

"BABY, TAKE A BOW" (Fox) 

APOLLO— (1,100), 20c-40c, 2nd week, 7 
days. Gross: $2,000. (Average, $2,500) 
"DR. MONICA" (Warners) 

CIRCLE— (2,800) , 20c-40c, 7 days. Gross: 
$3,500. (Average, $3,500) 

"AFFAIRS OF A GENTLEMAN" (Univ.) 
BAER-CARNERA FIGHT (Oliver) 

LYRIC— (2,000), 20c-40c, 8 days. Gross: 
$9,000. 

"OPERATOR 13" (M-G-M) 

PALACE— (3,000), 25c-40c, 7 days. Gross: 
(4,000. (Average, $4,000) 



Washington's 
Lead "Party" 
With Penner 



Washington, July 5. — Hot weather 
cut into the week's grosses as the to- 
tal slumped to $61,600, or 13.5 per cent 
under the average of $71,200. 

Only house to top average was 
Loew's Fox, whose week was bol- 
stered by five extra shows to a take 
of $22,900. Joe Penner and his own 
revue featured the stage show, which 
brought on the opening day 5,200 chil- 
dren, 800 over the number attracted 
by Amos 'n' Andy or Eddie Cantor. 
"Hollywood Party" was the feature. 

The Earle held its usual second 
place with $14,700 for "Dr. Monica" 
and its first tab show, "Words and 
Music," featuring Lester Cole and 
his 12 Singing Soldiers of Fortune and 
Herman Hyde. 

"Little Man, What Now?" slumped 
on a return engagement. Palace, 
RKO-Keith's, and Columbia were all 
off. 

Estimated takings, exclusive of tax, 
for the week ending June 28 : 

"DR. MONICA" (Warners) 

EARLE — (2,218), 25c-77c, 7 days. Stage 
show. Gross: $14,700. (Average, $17,600) 
"SUCH WOMEN ARE DANGEROUS" 
(M-G-M) 

LOEW'S COLUMBIA— (1,265), 25c-40c, 7 
days. Gross: $2,600. (Average, $3,100) 
"HOLLYWOOD PARTY" (M-G-M) 

LOEW'S FOX— (3,434), 25c-66c, 7 days. 
Stage show. Gross: $22,900. (Average, $20,- 

500) 

"CHANGE OF HEART" (Fox) 

LOEW'S PALACE— (2,390), 35c-77c, 7 
days. Gross: $10,700. 

"LITTLE MAN, WHAT NOW?" (Univ.) 

METROPOLITAN— (1,591), 25c-40c, 7 
days (return engagement). Gross: $3,500. 
(Average, $4,100) 

"THE LIFE OF VERGIE WINTERS" 
(Radio) 

RKO-KEITH'S— (1,830), 25c-55c, 7 days. 
Gross: $7,200. (Average, $11,400) 



Sue to Hold House 

St. Louis, July 5. — A suit to pre- 
vent wrecking of the Gayety has been 
filed in the Circuit Court by six plain- 
tiffs, who allege the Amusement Syn- 
dicate Co., owners of the building, are 
indebted to them for improvements and 
construction on the building amounting 
to $4,043. Plaintiffs are the C. H. 
Schroeder Building and Construction 
Co., John W. Reinhardt Stair Co., 
Robert N. Adams, Hill-Behan Lumber 
Co. and Moore Plumbing Co. Edward 
D. Meyer Wrecking and Supply Co. 
is a defendant in the suit. 



Operators Organize 

Denver, July 5. — Operators in most 
of non-union houses here have organ- 
ized and incorporated as the Sound 
Projectors' Union of Colorado. In- 
corporators are Charles Deckers, J. 
A. Swanson, R. O. McComb, Harold 
Mohlman and Harry Burcher. 



Change Cincy Opening 

Cincinnati, July 5. — Openings at 
the RKO Palace have been changed 
from Friday to Wednesday. Keith's 
hereafter will open on Thursday in- 
stead of Friday. 



"Works" Draws Work 

Denver, July 5. — "Shoot the 
Works" got an extra two days at the 
Denham. A gross of $7,000 the first 
seven was the reason. 



Breath a la Mode 

Hollywood, July 5. — Dr. 
Frank Nolan has at last fixed 
things so that players won't 
hare to smoke themselves to 
death in order to create a 
frosted breath for cinematic 
■now scenes. 

The doctor says he has in- 
Tented a gadget that fits in- 
side the upper lip and holds 
a quantity of dry ice. The 
ordinary breath contacting 
the ice creates the frost 
breath. The system was re- 
cently demonstrated in the 
"Merry Widow." 



Vergie" Gets 
Kansas City's 
High, $7,000 



Kansas City, July 5. — Grosses gen- 
erally were off as Kansas City swel- 
tered. Normal was reached by "The 
Life of Virgie Winters" with $7,000 
at the Mainstreet and "Affairs of a 
Gentleman" with a stage show at the 
Tower, which pulled $5,000. "The 
Show Off" gave the Midland $8,000, 
below par by $2,000. 

Total first run business at the five 
first runs was $28,200. Average is 
$31,500. 
Estimated takings : 

Week Ending June 28: 
"THE LIFE OF VERGIE WINTERS" 
(Radio) 

MAINSTREET— (3,100), 25c. 7 days, plus 
Saturday late show. Gross: $7,000. (Aver- 
age, straight films, $7,000) 

"THE SHOW OFF" (M-G-M) 

MIDLAND— (4.000), 25c, 7 days, plus Sat- 
urday midnight show. Gross: $8,000. (Aver- 
age, $10,000) 

"THE KEY" (Warners) 
"HERE COMES THE GROOM" (Para.) 

NEWMAN — (1,800), 25c, 7 days, plus Sat- 
urday late show. Gross: $4,900. (Average, 
$6,000) 

"AFFAIRS OF A GENTLEMAN" (Univ.) 

TOWER— (2.200). 25c, 7 days, plus Sat- 
urday midnight show. Stage: "Cartoon Ca- 
pers" revue, with Tom & Betty Wonder, 
Paige Keaton, 4 Racketeers, Lucille Jack- 
son, 3 Catchalots. Gross: $5,000. (Average, 
$5,000) 

Week Ending June 29: 

"NOW I'LL TELL" (Fox) 
BAER-CARNERA FIGHT FILMS (6 days) 

UPTOWN— (2.000). 25c, 7 days. Gross: 
$3,300. (Average, $3,500) 



Marker" and 
"Returns" Hit 
Montreal Top 



Montreal, July 5. — Main stems 
are not doing too badly, what with 
improved general conditions and a 
flock of tourists. The Capitol topped 
the town last week with $9,000 on 
"Little Miss Marker" and "Many 
Happy Returns." The Palace reg- 
istered the same total, but below av- 
erage in this case, on "The Thin 
Man" and "Beggars in Ermine." The 
Princess broke even at $6,000 with 
"Stingaree" and "Aggie Appleby." 
The weather was mostly fair and 
sticky. 

Total first run business was $37,- 
000. Average is $43,000. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing June 30: 

"LITTLE MISS MARKER" (Para.) 
"MANY HAPPY RETURNS" (Para.) 

CAPITOL— (2,547). 25c-35c-4Oc-50c-60c, 7 
days. Gross: $9,000. (Average, $9,000.) 
"HIS PRIVATE SECRETARY" 
(Showmen's) 
"FOUND ALIVE" (Ideal) 
IMPERIAL— (1,914). 25c-40c-50c. 7 days. 
Vaudeville: Berkes & Tyrrell; The Mad- 
caps; Frank Reckless & Co.; Dare & 
Yates; Armand & DeVore; Marian Dawn; 
Alex. Rothov ; Ralph Brown; Bob Brandies; 
Lee Shelley. Gross: S6.000. (Average. $6.- 
500.) 

"THE BLACK CAT" (Univ.) 
"UNCERTAIN LADY" (Univ.) 

LOEW'S — (3.115). 25c-35c-50c-65c. 7 days. 
Gross: S7.000. (Average. $10,500.) 

"THE THIN MAN" (M-G-M) 
"BEGGARS IN ERMINE" (Monogram) 
PALACE— (2.600), 25c-35c-50c-60c-75c. 7 
days. Gross: $9,000. (Average. $11,000.) 
"STINGAREE" (Radio) 
"AGGIE APPLEBY" (Radio) 
PRINCESS — (2.272), 25c-35c-50c-65c. 7 
davs. Gross: $6,000. (Average. $6,000.) 



Acquire 3 in Pueblo 

Pueblo, July 5. — Pueblo Theatres, 
Inc., organized by T. B. Noble. Jr., 
Frank L. Dent and George A. Crow- 
der, have taken over three theatres 
here. The Rialto was taken over from 
J. J. Goodstein, and the Chief and 
Pueblo from the Westland Theatres, 
Inc., of which the three men are also 
officers. 



S eg all Plans Theatre 

Philadelphia, July 5. — Charles Se- 
gall, vice-president and manager of the 
Principal Theatres, has acquired a site 
at Broad St. and Olney Ave. in the 
northern section of Philadelphia and 
will build a theatre of the de luxe 
variety with a capacity of 1,500. He 
hopes to have the house completed by 
Thanksgiving Day. The project is Se- 
gall's own, and not part of his Prin- 
cipal Theatres affiliation. 



In Deal with Adams 

Budd Rogers, general sales man- 
ager of Liberty, has closed with Jack 
K. Adams, president of Adams Film 
Exchanges, Inc., to handle his product 
in Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas. 



Select Plans (< Old Lace" 

"Lavender and Old Lace" by Myr- 
tle Reed will be made by Select at 
Biograph. 



Lifton Joins Liberty 

Louis S. Lifton has been appointed 
director of advertising and publicity 
for Liberty. He was until recently as- 
sociated with Educational-World Wide 
as assistant to Gordon S. White, ad- 
vertising head. 



Weiss Serial on Custer 

"Custer's Last Stand" will be pro- 
duced as a serial by Louis Weiss for 
release via Exploitation Pictures, Inc. 
Production will be centered in Holly- 
wood with Weiss on deck to personally 
supervise. 



Pre-Release "Drummond" 

Philadelphia, July 5. — Instead of 
waiting for the August reopening of 
the Aldine, its local outlet, U. A. has 
arranged with Stanley-Warner to re- 
lease "Bulldog Drummond Strikes 
Back" at the Stanley July 14. 



Up for Attorney General 

Denver, July 5.— David W. Oyler, 
operator who studied law in his spare 
time, is a candidate for the Democratic 
nomination for attorney general of 
Colorado. 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Taps New Revenue Source 



Columbus, O., July 5. — Two circuits, established a year ago in 
the Eastern Ohio and West Virginia coal mining region by Steu- 
benTille, Ohio, interests, and operated entirely with portable equip- 
ment, have materially increased receipts of the Paramount ex- 
change, according to M. R. ("Duke") Clark, local manager. 

Each circuit plays seven nights a week in mining camps having 
a small theatre in which pictures have not been shown since the 
silent era. The projector is set up in the regular booth with a 
cable extension carrying back to the sound horn on the stage. Pic- 
tures are heavily advertised. As many as 100 one-sheets and other 
accessories have been used in a single week. 

Clark points out that, prior to inauguration of the 14-town cir- 
cuit, no revenue in rentals was derived from this particular region 
for six years, whereas returns have been steady each week since 
the project was launched. Only Paramount pictures are shown. 



Friday. July 6, 1934 



K.C. Theatres Get 
Help from Papers 



Kansas City, July 5. — As a result 
of intense competition between the two 
local dailies for theatre advertising, 
they have extended their services to 
the theatres. The Star has added tab- 
loid reviews in the Friday morning 
edition, to coincide with most first run 
openings, in addition to the usual re- 
views on Sunday. 

The Journal-Post daily amusement 
column is chiefly devoted to publicity 
on the current and future attractions. 
This paper now includes the Fox Up- 
town and the Tower, non-advertising 
first runs, in its Sunday reviews as a 
move to obtain their business. 

Neighborhood theatres are getting 
more cooperation from the Journal- 
Post than ever before. This was 
promised when 21 neighborhoods re- 
cently signed to use daily space in the 
amusement directory at $3.50 a week. 
The advertising neighborhoods run a 
Journal-Post trailer, for which they 
receive the reported sum of $1 weekly, 
which is turned over to the I. T. O. as 
dues. 

Downtown first runs are irked that 
the Journal-Post has seen fit to tie up 
with the neighborhoods in giving free 
tickets in an advertisers' promotion 
contest plugged through Illustrated 
News, the paper's weekly advertising 
supplement. Two neighborhoods are 
chosen weekly to give away 100 passes, 
and in return receive free publicity. 
Before the neighborhoods starting 
using the Journal-Post, the first runs 
had a monopoly on this cooperative 
tieup. 



New House for Lawrence 

Lawrence, Kan., July 5. — This 
town next fall will boast the oldest 
and newest theatres west of the Mis- 
sissippi. The newly formed Common- 
wealth Theatre Corp. has begun con- 
struction of a 920-seat house esti- 
mated to cost $3,5,000 and scheduled 
for opening in September. The new 
company is affiliated with Common- 
wealth Theatres of Kansas City, 
which owns the Patee in Lawrence, 
which is credited with being the first 
picture theatre west of the Missis- 
sippi. 

Stanley C. Schwahn, manager of the 
Patee, is president of Commonwealth 
Lawrence. C. A. Schultz is vice- 
I president. Approximately 50 business 
i men and citizens of Lawrence are 
stockholders. 



To Erect Manila House 

Washington, July 5. — Eastern The- 
I atrical Co., Inc., of Manila, P. L, will 
' erect a $500,000 theatre in Manila, 
according to a report submitted to the 
; U. S. Department of Commerce by 
I Acting Trade Commissioner Carl H. 
Boehringer. 

The project is financed entirely by 
Filipinos and the company is now 
operating the Metropolitan and Fox 
Theatres in Manila. 

The house will seat 1,100 and will 
be air conditioned. 



McConnells Have Twins 

Birmingham, July 5. — Thomas Y k 
McConnell, Strand manager, is receiv- 
ing congratulation. Mrs. McConnell 
gave birth to twin girls. The trio is 
doing nicely. 



Go First Run Doubles 

Youngstown, O., July 5. — Two 
downtown theatres here have gone 
first run dual policy for the summer. 
The Park some time ago switched to 
dual first runs, with two changes 
weekly, with atop admission of 20 
cents. 

In competition more recently, the 
State, an independent house, intro- 
duced first run duals, with two 
changes weekly and admissions scaled 
from a dime to 25 cents. 



New Tax Up in N. O. 

New Orleans, July 5. — By the 
terms of an ordinance introduced and 
practically adopted by the Commis- 
sion Council, theatres will pay a tax 
on marqueess of $10 a year; signs, 
muslin, $1 ; easel signs, $5 ; electric 
signs, $5 ; any theatre sign, $5 ; 
streamers (used occasionally), $5; 
weighing machines, $1.50. In the 
neighborhood districts the rate is cut 
in half. 



Fox Signs Two Players 

Hollywood, July 5. — Fox has given 
a long term contract to Frances Carl- 
on, former New York stage actress. 
Her first role will be the lead in "The 
State Versus Elinor Norton." 

The studio also has given a long- 
termer to James Qualen, veteran char- 
acter actor. His last for Fox was 
"Servants' Entrance." 



Police Checking Blast 

Omaha, July 5. — Police are inves- 
tigating bombing of a cleaning shop 
located in the Orpheum theatre build- 
ing early Monday morning. So ter- 
rific was the blast, most of the lights 
in the vertical sign light and in the 
house marquee were shattered. 



Ohio Managers Shifted 

Columbus, July 5. — Recent mana- 
gerial changes include transfer of 
Charles Winthrop from the RKO 
Paramount, Cincinnati suburban, to 
the Majestic here. Erwin Bock, man- 
ager of the RKO Capitol, Cincinnati, 
which went dark recently, succeeds 
Winthrop. Harvey Cocks, manager 
of the Harris, Findlay, has been 
transferred to the Strand, Akron, re- 
placing Dick Wright, recently ele- 
vated to district manager for Warners 
in northeastern Ohio. Ben Waller- 
stein, manager of Warners' Palace, 
Lorain, for several years, has been 
transferred to San Pedro, Cal., to 
take charge of one of the Warner 
spots. 



K. C. Picnic July 16 

Kansas City, July 5. — The local 
industry's annual picnic and golf tour- 
nament will be held July 16 at Ivan- 
hoe Country Club. The M. P. Relief 
Fund, which has directed these outings 
in the past, will this year be joined 
by the Variety Club. It is planned 
that eventually the Variety Club will 
take over all such local activities. 



Wessling Joins Gaumont 

Portland, July 5. — Walter Wess- 
ling, one of the oldest exchange man- 
agers of the Pacific Northwest, and 
connected with the Northwest Film 
Exchange for some time past, has 
been named Oregon distributor for 
Gsumont British product. 



Korda Plans "Nijinsky" 

London, July 5. — Alexander Kor- 
da plans a stage play based on the 
life of Nijinsky, famous Russian 
dancer, with Charles Laughton in the 
lead. Later, he is figuring on a talker, 
perhaps with Paul Muni. 



15 



Bank Deposits Show 
Ohio Is Picking Up 



Columbus, O., July 5. — Indication 
of financial improvement in Ohio is 
reflected in the report just released 
by David M. Auch, secretary of the 
Ohio Bankers' Ass'n., which shows an 
increase of $81,550,000 in deposits of 
state and national banks, exclusive of 
conservator or restricted institutions, 
between the December and March 
calls. Resources increased $97,905,000 
during the same period. 

Improvement still is continuing, ac- 
cording to information, although ex- 
hibitors throughout the state compalin 
of poor business, some of the key sit- 
uations reporting an all-time low for 
June. 

"U" Puts Its Stars 
In Radio Sequences 

Hollywood, July 5. — Universal has 
decided to throw in a generous portion 
of its star roster in the radio skit 
sequence of "Gift of Gab." 

Lined up for the one sequence are 
Lowell Sherman, Chester Morris, 
Binnie Barnes, Boris Karloff, Bela 
Lugosi, Paul Lukas and Roger Pryor. 
These names are in addition to Ed- 
mund Lowe, Gloria Stuart, Alice 
White, Ruth Etting and two sets of 
harmony teams, who appear in the top 
spots. 

The film went into production Sat- 
urday with Karl Freund directing. 

Retail Sales Gain 
In Salt Lake Area 

Salt Lake City, July 5. — Retail 
sales here are up 18 per cent over 
May of last year and the gain for the 
first five months over the same period 
for 1933 is 20 per cent, according to 
reports from the 12th Federal Re- 
serve District Bank. 

For Utah and Idaho the May in- 
crease was 20.2 per cent and for the 
first five-month period it was 23.9 per 
cent. 



Back to Duals Again 

Omaha, July 5. — The World is back 
on dual policy with the conclusion of 
four weeks of vaudeville by the Bert 
Smith Varieties company. The com- 
pany had been booked for two weeks 
and the contract was extended two 
weeks longer when business seemed to 
warrant it. A box-office decline dur- 
ing the second two weeks terminated 
the engagement. 



Car stairs Reaches Coast 

Hollywood, July 5. — John Patty 
Carstairs, English writer signed by 
David O. Selznick on his recent trip 
to London, is here to start a long- 
term contract. He has received no as- 
signment yet. 



Penn-State Dissolved 

Dover, Del., July 5. — Penn-State 
Amusement Co., a Delaware corpora- 
tion, has been dissolved by the State 
Department. A certificate of voluntary 
dissolution was issued following the 
consent of all the stockholders. 



Columbia 'Change Grows 

Omaha, July 5. — The Columbia ex- 
change has moved one door west on 
Davenport St. into new and modern 
quarters. The new quarters have 
1,100 more square feet of space. 



Hollywood Personals 

Hollywood, July 5. — Frances Drake is back from Honolulu. . . . 
Jack Oakie's mother entertained Jeanette MacDonald's mother 
and Bob Ritchie's mother at dinner the other night. . . . Gordon 
and Revel back from San Francisco where they appeared over 
Walter Winchell's program. . . . Lee Tracy is looking at yachts. . . . 
Gordon Westcott has taken up polo. . . . Columbia has postponed 
"The Girl Friend" until Lupe Velez returns from her personal 
appearance tour in the east. . . . Frank Borzage has been elected 
secretary and treasurer of the Uplifters' Club. . . . Cecilia Parker 
has been signed to play Garbo's sister in "The Painted Veil." . . . 
Virginia Karns, who has made such a hit here at the Biltmore 
Bowl, gets the role of "Widow Piper" in Roach's "Babes in Toy- 
land." . . . 



16 



MOTION- PICTURE 

DAILY 



Friday, July 6, 1934 



Arthur Will 
Oversee St. 
Louis Spots 

(Continued from pane 1) 

the receivership, which is expected 
some time next week. 

Arthur and Marco Wolf returned 
yesterday from St. Louis where they 
attended the court hearing and ap- 
proval of the sale. 

According to Arthur's plans, the 
Ambassador and St. Louis will show 
F. & M. stage shows with pictures and 
the Fox and Missouri will be put on 
a single feature policy. Duals at the 
Grand Central will be continued un- 
less St. Louis neighborhood arid sur- 
burban theatres agree to eliminate twin 
bills. 

F. & M. plan to increase prices, 
provided they get cooperation of other 
St. Louis operators, to 35 cent mat- 
inees and 55 cent evenings. The scale 
would be general downtown, they hope. 

Arthur has purchased a Douglas 
plane to commute between New York, 
Salt Lake City, St. Louis and Los 
Angeles. He expects to spend most of 
his future time in the field developing 
the F. & M. circuit. He leaves next 
week for St. Louis to work out the 
operating setup for the five theatres. 
Marco returns to the coast at the 
same time, stopping at St. Louis. 



St. Louis, July 5. — Federal Judge 
Davis has approved sale of the Ambas- 
sador, Missouri and Grand Central to 
the bondholders' protective committee 
for $2,000,000. He also approved the 
reorganization plan of the committee 
and instructed counsel to present a 
formal decree for his approval to- 
morrow. 

Objections by counsel for Warners 
and others were over-ruled by Special 
Master Nelson Cunliff on June 7, the 
dissentors contending the sale price 
was inadequate and the reorganization 
plan unfair. 

According to court procedure, the 
lesees are not supposed to take pos- 
session until 60 days after approval of 
the reorganization, but it is under- 
stood the bondholders are anxious to 
have F. & M. step in immediately and 
the court will approve. 



See New Delay in 
Fox Met. Dickers 

(Continued from page 1) 

a sub-committee of the Fox Met bond- 
holders' committee. 

"Considerable progress" in the ne- 
gotiations was reported by representa- 
tives of both sides last night, but an 
agreement prior to the court hearing 
today was not held likely. One spokes- 
man said that nothing final was ex- 
pected before Monday or Tuesday 
and predicted accord would be reached 
at that time with Loew's and Warners 
agreeing to a purchase of the com- 
mittee's deposited bonds, about 85 per 
cent of a $12,500,000 issue, for $4,000,- 
000. Loew's and Warners would then 
proceed with their own reorganization 
of the circuit, taking their own chances 



MOTION PICTURE DAILY 5 
HOLLYWOOD PREVIEW 



"Ladies Should Listen" 

{Paramount) 

Hollywood, July 5. — This is a deluge of comical incidents, a delightful 
hodge-podge that should please audiences. 

The story deals with Cary Grant as a super Beau Brummel of Paris 
involved with a series of women, crooks, rich friends and a doorman, 
Charlie Ray, all somehow vaguely enmeshed in an option on a nitrate 
mine in Chile. Frances Drake, as a telephone operator in love with 
Grant, furnishes the motive for the frantic mixups by messing up 
Grant's affairs via her switchboard. It all doesn't make much sense and 
is free farce, but it should provoke plenty of laughs. 

Every member of the cast contributes good trouping, including Grant, 
Nydia Westman and Rosita Moreno, as part of Cary's female following, 
also Miss Drake, Edward Everett Horton, as Miss Westman's would-be 
suitor, and George Barbier as an enraged father. Ray, as the doorman, 
received the biggest hand from an audience who had evidently not for- 
gotten. Frank Tuttle's direction is keyed for humor. 

High spots are Grant's use of thunder and lightning gadgets to detain 
and dispose of the ladies according to his whims. The picture should 
suit any audience as a program issue. Running time, 60 minutes. 



Looking 9 Em Over 



"Cash" 

(Mundus Distributing Corp.) 

An entertaining comedy, directed by Zoltan Korda, with Robert Donat, 
Wendy Barrie and Edmund Gwenn in the principal roles. It is a typical 
English picture and numerous situations are laugh-provoking. 

With the depression, Gwenn and his daughter, Miss Barrie, find them- 
selves evading collectors. Gwenn, who has promoted several past fail- 
ures, has an idea to develop a super-swimming pool. On the evening 
when he is to get together with financial friends on the project, he does 
a lot of maneuvering to get food and keep the lights from being turned 
off. 

Donat, an electrician's assistant, comes to the rescue. In his tool case 
he finds $100,000 cash and becomes a partner to the proposed deal. The 
three financial men fall for the idea when they see the cash and, while 
Gwenn is knee deep in negotiations, Donat and Miss Barrie fall in love. 

The butler, by mistake, picks up a newspaper, which unknown to him 
contains the $100,000, and puts it in the fireplace. The money is burned 
to cinders. Fortunately, after the deal is closed, the loss of the money 
is discovered. Another break comes when it is learned the money was 
counterfeit. 

This is the first of 26 releases planned by Mundus next season. Run- 
ning; time, 62 minutes. 



on cancellation of leases by landlords 
privileged to do so under their pacts 
with the receiver for the circuit. 

Reports that the Loew-Warner bid 
had been boosted to $4,500,000 and ac- 
cepted by the sub-committee for the 
bondholders yesterday were emphat- 
ically denied on both sides. 

That the I. T. O. A. would oppose 
"as a major issue" the acquisition of 
the circuit by Loew's arid Warners 
was disclosed yesterday by an of- 
ficer of the organization, who pointed 
out that the playing of M-G-M pro- 
duct in 42 Randforce houses of the 
circuit would set back numerous in- 
dependent houses to third and fourth 
run on that product. The Randforce- 
operated houses are not playing 
M-G-M product now, it was said, but 
are expected to if Loew becomes joint 
owner of Fox Met with Warners. 



Artco Stays at Roxy 

Howard S. Cullman, trustee for the 
Roxy, has renewed the contract of 
Artco Corp. for another six months. 
Harry C. Arthur is president of the 
company. 

With "Baby, Take a Bow" chalk- 
ing a gross of $29,000 the first week, 
Cullman plans to hold the Fox film for 
a third week. 

New product deals are under way 
with Fox, Universal, Columbia, Brit- 
ish Gaumont and Warners. 



Los Angeles 
Slides; Shy 
Of Big Films 



Los Angeles, July 5. — Lacking in 
pictures with a real draw and despite 
fair weather, local grosses dipped 
about $10,000 under average for the 
first-run battery for the week which 
ended Wednesday night. 

The Paramount continued to lead 
with its customary lavish stage at- 
traction, this time "Cotton Club Re- 
vue," plus Lew Hites and his orches- 
tra and Mae Digges. "Kiss and Make 
Up" was the film. 

Aside from the Pantages which 
ended at about $3,500 against a $3,200 
average with "Hollywood Party" and 
"Sisters Under the Skin," receipts else- 
where were about 25 per cent. off. 
Total business was $61,247. Average 
total, $71,850. 

Estimated takings for the Week 
ending July 4 : 

"THE VIRGIN MAN" (French) 

FILM ARTE — (900). 40c-50c, 7 days. Gross: 
$2,200. (Average, $2,650.) 

"BABY TAKE A BOW" (Fox) 

LOEW'S STATE — (2,413), 30c-5Sc, 7 
days. Gross: $11,500. (Average, $14,000.) 
"KISS AND MAKE-UP" (Para.) 

PARAMOUNT — (3,595), 30c-55c, 7 days. 
On the stage: Fanchon & Marco "Cotton 
Club Revue," Lew Hite's orchestra and 
Digges. Gross: $19,847. (Average. $18,000.) 

"COCKEYED CAVALIERS" (Radio) 

RKO— (2,700), 25c-40c, 7 days. Gross: 
$4,200. (Average, $8,000.) 
"RETURN OF THE TERROR" (F. N.) 

WARNER BROS. (HOLLYWOOD)— (3,- 
000), 25c-55c, 7 days. Gross: $11,000. (Aver- 
age, $14,000.) 

"RETURN OF THE TERROR" (F. N.) 

WARNER BROS. (DOWNTOWN)— 
(3,400), 25c-55c, 7 days. Gross: $9,000. (Av- 
erage. $12,000.) 

"HOLLYWOOD PARTY" (M-G-M) 
"SISTERS UNDER THE SKIN" (CoL) 

PANTAGES— (3.000)— 25c-40c. 7 days 
Gross: $3,500. (Average, $3,200.) 



Mulvey, Fish on Coast 

Hollywood, July 5.— James A. Mul- 
vey and Ben Fish of Samuel Gold- 
wyn's eastern office, are here for a 
series of conferences. 



Golden to Make Talk 

Edward Golden, Monogram sales 
manager, left for Atlanta last night to 
talk before the convention of the 
GFTA theatre owners in that city 
tomorrow. He will talk on "Inde- 
pendence." 



BUILDING 
THEATRE 
PATRONAGE 

For Handy Reference 

This is a treatise on the- 
atre management in de- 
tail. It is needed on 
every theatre man's desk. 
The wise manager will 
consult it many times 
a day. 

Have This Inexpensive 
Assistant At Your 

Command 
Price $5.10 

QUIGLEY 
BOOKSHOP 

1790 Broadway New York 



The Leading 

.Newspaper 

m.thJ§ M 



Motion 
Picture 



Industry 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



NEW YORK, SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1934 



Philadelphia Exhibitors to 

Meet Monday on Church Ban 

Philadelphia, July 6. — Confusion entered the church boycott situ- 
ation today with word from both the M. P. T. O. and the Inde- 
pendent Exhibitors Protective Ass'n, rival bodies, that each group 
had called its own meeting Monday to discuss the situation. The 
former will meet at the Adelphi and the latter at the Broad- 
wood. What Philadelphia exhibitors apparently have to determine 
now is which organization powwow they will attend. 

In the meantime, the Catholic Standard and Times, official 
church publication in this diocese, today was openly dubious over 
the announced intention of Warners and the M. P. T. O. to close 
their theatres unless the ban is lifted. 



VOL. 36. NO. 5 



Cleveland to 
Go Off Dual 
Bills Sunday 



Agreement Affects All 
But New Operators 



Cleveland, July 6. — On Sunday 
every theatre belonging to the Cleve- 
land M. P. Exhibitors' Ass'n., com- 
prising 90 per cent of the houses of 
Greater Cleveland, will drop double 
features by unanimous agreement. 

The agreement, signed by all mem- 
bers, commits them to a single feature 
policy for the remainder of the 1933-34 
season and for the entire 1934-35 
season. It is said by a leading local 
law firm to be binding. 

The Catholic Universe, loud in its 
demand for clean pictures, accepted 
this announcement with enthusiasm and 
took credit for the policy, claiming it 

{Continued on page 3) 

Cleveland Flooded 
With Zone Plaints 

Cleveland, July 6. — A flood of 
complaints charging that the new 
clearance and zoning schedules being 
set up by the local code board are 
opposed to the schedules arrived at as 
a result of settlement of a law suit 
brought against first runs here two 
years ago is being forwarded to Campi 

{Continued on page 3) 

Famous Canadian 
Job Goes to Hazza 

Toronto, July 6. — William Hazza 
of Calgary has been appointed west- 
ern division manager of Famous Play- 
ers as successor to Harry Dahn of 
Winnipeg. Hazza will establish 
headquarters at Winnipeg. Dahn will 
return to the east. 

Harold Bishop, formerly manager 
of the Capitol, Calgary, becomes as- 
sistant to Hazza at Winnipeg. 



Buys a Yacht 

Toronto, July 6. — N. L. Na- 
thanson, president of Famous 
Players, has purchased a 
steam yacht, the Thalassa, 
from the estate of C. O. Still- 
man, former president of Im- 
perial Oil, Ltd., subsidiary of 
Standard Oil. The Thalassa 
is of 138 tons registry and 
carries a crew of six. 



ITO A to Have 
Only Darrow's 
Moral Support 



While the I. T. O. A. and other in- 
dependent factions have the "moral 
support and sympathy" of Clarence 
Darrow, former head of the National 
Recovery Review Board, their fight 
against the code will have to be car- 
ried on without his active or official 
assistance, the Chicago criminal attor- 
ney said yesterday. 

In clarifying his position in the face 
of definite statements that he would 
give his services without remuneration 

{Continued on page 3) 



No Code Hearings, 
States Rosenblatt 

Washington, July 6. — No public 
hearings on amendments to the film 
code are contemplated, it was de- 
clared today by Division Adminis- 
trator Sol A. Rosenblatt in comment- 
ing upon reports from New York 
that a hearing had been tentatively 
set for the last of this month. 

It was explained by the division 

{Continued on page 3) 



KMTA to Act 
On Guaranty, 
Percentages 



Kansas City, July 6. — Action 
against guaranty and percentage de- 
mands of distributors will be sought 
by the Kansas-Missouri Theatre 
Ass'n. when it meets in convention 
here July 17. A. F. Baker, presi- 
dent, has issued a call for the conven- 
tion, which will be held in the Vari- 
ety Club quarters. 

The association's board of directors 
is on record against existing percent- 
ages, recently agreeing that "the 

{Continued on page 2) 



Columbia Men Off 
For Chicago Meet 

Columbia home office executives, 
headed by Jack Cohn entrain for Chi- 
cago on the 20th Century this after- 
noon in a special car. The three-day 
session of the western offices of the 
company will open Monday morning 
at the Medinah Club. 

Included among those making the 
trip are : Jack Cohn, Abe Schneider, 

{Continued on page 3) 



Alert, 

Intelligent 

and 

Faithful 
Service to 
the Industry 
in All 
Branches 



TEN CENTS 

Loew- Warner 
To Make New 
Fox Met Bid 

Revised Terms Will Be 
Submitted Tuesday 

A new Loew-Warner bid of $4,- 
000,000 for the Fox Metropolitan 
bonds outstanding, rather than for the 
leaseholds and fee properties of the 
circuit, will be ready for submission 
to the bondholders' committee next 
Tuesday, it was disclosed at a hear- 
ing yesterday before Federal Judge 
Julian W. Mack. 

The hearing was postponed to 
Thursday, July 12, to permit time for 
the Loew-Warner bid to be drafted 
and the committee to consider it. 

Attorneys for the bondholders' com- 
mittee and for the Loew-Warner in- 
terests expressed the hope that they 
could "get together" on both price 
and terms of the sale in the interim. 

"Have the bidders changed their 
price or their terms?" Judge Mack 

{Continued on page 2) 

NEA in Resolution 
Hits Unclean Films 

Washington, July 6. — The Nation- 
al Education Ass'n's annual meeting 
came to an end here today with the 
passage of a resolution condemning 
indecent films. 

Pointing out that "the motion pic- 
ture is one of the most important 
means of education today," the reso- 
lution proclaimed the adherence of the 

{Continued on page 4) 

No Circuit Closing 
Up in Wilmington 

Wilmington, Del., July 6. — Al- 
though Catholics of the Wilmington 
diocese are interested in the protest 
against alleged indecent pictures, local 
circuit theatre managers said today 

{Continued on page 4) 



Paper Value Less 

Paper valuation of all 
amusement issues listed on 
the New York Stock Ex- 
change was $151,462,110 on 
July 1 as compared with 
$165,014,143 on June 1, accord- 
ing to official exchange rec- 
ords. 

This is a shrinkage of $13,- 
552,033. 



Capri with Your Soup 



Philadelphia, July 6. — A new angle in night club and restaurant 
operation is to be put into effect at the Arcadia Restaurant by 
Arthur H. Padula, who has just leased the place. He plans an 
"International Restaurant" and one of the features of the enter- 
tainment will be newsreels and travel subjects which will bear out 
the international angle. 

Padula, a University of Pennsylvania graduate, is well-known 
for his innovations in restaurant and cabaret service. At the 
present time, he operates the Anchorage in Fairmont Park which 
he has equipped with "Flourescence," his own color lighting devip" 
which has since been used by many presentation units. 



2 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Saturday. July 7, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 

(Registered U. S. Patent Office) 



Vol. 36 July 7, 1934 No. 5 



Martin Quigley 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 
[SB MAURICE KANN NRA 

rSTi >£r 

IZIEB JAMES A. CRON JX? 
U^^fe^l Advertising Manager — 



Published daily except Sunday and holi- 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub- 
sidiary of Quigley Publications, Inc., 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 1790 Broadway, New 
York. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Cable ad 
dress "Quigpubco, New York." All con- 
tents copyrighted 1934 by Motion Piciuie 
Daily, Inc. Address all correspondence to 
the New York Office. Other Quigley pub- 
lications: MOTION PICTURE HERALD, 
BETTER THEATRES, THE MOTION 
PICTURE ALMANAC and THE CHI- 
CAGOAN. 

Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Life 
Building, Vine and Yucca Streets, Victor 
M. Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 407 
South Dearborn Street, Edzvin S. Clif- 
ford, manager; London Bureau: Remo 
House, 310 Regent St., London, W. 1, 
Bruce Allan, Representative. Cable address: 
"Quigpubco, London"; Berlin Bureau: 
Berlin - Tempelhof , Kaiserin - Augustastrasse 
28, Joachim K. Rutenberg, Representative; 
Paris Bureau: 19, Rue de la Cour des- 
Noues, Pierre Autre, Representative; Rome 
Bureau: Yiale Gorizia, Vittorio Malpassuti, 
Representative; Sydney Bureau: 102 Sus- 
sex Street, Cliff Holt, Representative; Mex- 
ico City Bureau: Apartado 269, James 
Lockhart, Representative; Glasgow Bureau: 
86 Dundrennan Road, G. Holmes, Repre- 
sentative; Budapest Bureau: 11 Olasz 
Fasor 17, Endre He-cesi, Representative. 

Entered as second class matter January 
4, 1926 at the Post Office at New York 
City, N. Y., under Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada SI 5 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 

Action on Guaranty, 
Percentages Sought 

{Continued from page 1) 

present arrangement of percentage 
sales is of great detriment to the ex- 
hibitor," and has scheduled this topic 
for a going over. Exhibitors an- 
swering an association questionnaire 
have condemned existing contract 
terms as well as score charges. 

Competitive policies, admissions, 
duals and price reducing practices 
and film rentals are among other sub- 
jects for discussion. Baker, who is 
a member of the local clearance and 
zoning board, promises a round-table 
on code operations and regulations, 
and their effect on the exhibitor to 
date. 

The convention will formulate a 
program designed to combat adverse 
legislation, which is looming for Kan- 
sas in the form of a proposed sales 
tax. The current religious drive for 
clean films will also be brought up. 

Officers for the ensuing year will 
be elected. Baker, who was chosen 
president last year when the organi- 
zation was formed, says he is not 
a candidate for reelection and favors 
an exhibitor from out in the terri- 
tory to succeed him. Baker is from 
Kansas City, Kan. 

Date of the meeting was set for 
July 17 to permit visiting exhibitors 
to attend the annual industry picnic at 
the Ivanhoe Country Club on July 16. 



Otter son in Europe 

London, July 6. — John E. Otter- 
son, president of Erpi, arrived today 
from New York on the Leviathan. 



Loew- Warner 
To Make New 
Fox Met Bid 

(Continued from page 1) 

asked Morton G. Bogue, counsel for 
the bondholders' committee. 

"They haven't changed the price," 
Bogue replied, "but their new bid will 
eliminate all the provisions which have 
been bothering us." 

It was learned later that the ma- 
jor change in the terms of the bid 
will be the Loew-Warner agreement 
to purchase the committee's bonds 
and then proceed with their own re- 
organization of the circuit, rather 
than insisting that the circuit be tak- 
en over by the bondholders and the 
actual leaseholds and fee properties 
then acquired from the bondholders 
by Loew's and Warners for $4,000,- 
000. The latter proposal was the 
substance of the first Loew-Warner 
bid. 

End of Leases Possible 

The new bid, it was said, will also 
dispense with the Loew-Warner de- 
mand for a breakdown of operating 
costs and grosses of individual houses 
of the circuit, and will make provi- 
sion for possible cancellation of 
leases by landlords who retained their 
right to do so in the event of a sale 
of the circuit to outsiders. 

Attorneys for Skouras and Rand- 
force, the present operators of the 
circuit, again opposed the new delay 
in the settlement of the circuit's fu- 
ture, citing the urgency of labor con- 
tracts and film buys. They stated 
that the present operators were un- 
able to make film deals now because 
of the uncertainty which exists and 
declared that unless new season deals 
were closed soon Fox Met might be 
"left out entirely"' next year in the 
event the Loew-Warner deal fell 
through. 

"There may be a lot of truth in 
what you say," Judge Mack com- 
mented, "but I am not justified in pro- 
ceeding against the judgment of the 
bondholders' committee, which is ask- 
ing for the postponement." 

"It appears that my clients are be- 
ing sold down the river," remarked 
the Skouras attorney. 

Both George Skouras and Sam 



Rinzler were spectators at yesterday's 
hearing. 

It was disclosed that the Mosholu, 
Tuxedo, Ogden and U. S. theatres 
will not be included in a final deal 
for the circuit, the landlord being pre- 
pared to exercise his right to with- 
draw. 



Denver Orpheum to 
Be Sold at Auction 

Denver. July 6. — The Orpheum will 
be sold to the highest bidder, provid- 
ing the bid is more than $400,000, by 
Aug. 20. The district court has given 
the U. S. National Bank a judgment 
against the theatre for S554.445 be- 
cause of a mortgage for $500,000 due 
in 1936, on which the interest was de- 
faulted last year. 

The theatre has been in receivership 
since April 1, 1933, and has been 
leased to the Welton Theatre Corp.. 
controlled by Harry Huffman. 

RKO is expected to be a bidder, 
trying to regain control of the house. 
Some theatre men here look for Para- 
mount to enter a bid. Publix has been 
out of Denver a year. 



Baby to Mrs. Neumann 

Hollywood, July 6. — Mrs. Kurt 
Neumann, wife of the Universal di- 
rector, celebrated her own birthday 
by giving birth to a 7^-pound baby 
boy at the Cedars of Lebanon Hos- 
pital. Both mother and child are 
reported doing well. 

On Monday. Neumann begins the 
filming of "Wake Up and Dream." 
the B. F. Zeidman production with 
Russ Columbo, June Knight and 
Roger Pryor heading the cast. 



Move to Recall Sherman 

Certain groups in Local 306 have 
started a movement for the recall of 
Harry Sherman, president, and his 
fellow officers. Petitions for a recall 
election were presented at a Brooklyn 
meeting last Wednesday and they will 
be acted upon next Wednesday. 



Heat Closes Offices 

Due to the continued heat wave, 
the Universal home office closed at 
3 :30 yesterday. The Hays office and 
the Fox and Warner home offices 
closed at 4. 



< Purely 
Personal ► 

FRANK BRUNER, who handles 
publicity at the Rivoli, is back in 
town after a short visit to the World's 
Fair. Bruner is awaiting the re- 
opening of the house with "Roth- 
schild" shortly. 

Abe Siegel, promotion manager of 
the Literary Digest, says it's good to 
be back in production again. Years 
ago, he was a branch manager for 
Fox in Detroit. 

Sam Wiesexthal has completed 
his work for Universal in London 
and will return today to New York. 
He is no longer connected with Uni- 
versal. 

Leox Leoxidoff. producer of the 
Radio City Music Hall stage shows, 
arrived from Europe yesterday on the 
Manretania. 

Fay Wray and Ralph Bellamy, 
who have been playing in "Woman in 
the Dark" at the Biograph Studio, 
leave today for the coast. 

Richard and Mrs. Dix were 
tendered a farewell party yesterday 
aboard the S.S. Santa Lucia before 
the couple sailed for the coast. 

Ax Szekler, Universal's Brazilian 
manager, who is in town on a semi- 
business and vacation trip, will re- 
main indefinitely. 

Harry Martix. critic of the Mem- 
phis Commercial Appeal, is giving 
Times Square and its highlights the 
once over. 

Vera Murray is operating the 
Washington, Dobbs Ferry as a sum- 
mer theatre for tryout of new plays. 

Isabel Jewell is due in town next 
Tuesdav for a short vacation from 
M-G-M. 

P. D. Cochrane returns Monday 
from a two-week vacation. 

Hal Hode is up at Lake Katonah 
for the hot season. 

Hal Horxe was out of the office 
for a few days on a short vacation. 

Radio Gets Hepburn 
For 2 More Years 

Hollywood, July 6. — Radio has 
signed Katharine Hepburn to a new 
two-year contract under which it will 
have her services exclusively. The 
agreement carries no options and calls 
for three pictures a year at a higher 
salary. 



Para. Regional Closes 

Paramount's regional sales meeting 
closed yesterday at the Waldorf As- 
toria, with Divisional Sales Mana- 
ger J. J. Unsrer presiding, assisted 
by Milt Kusell, and William Erbb, 
district managers. 

Branch managers present were 
Clayton Eastman, Albany ; Kenneth 
Robinson. Buffalo: E. Bell, New 
Jersey: H. Randel, Brooklyn; My- 
ron Sattler, New York City; J. H. 
Kane. New Haven ; J. H. Stevens, 
Boston, and Ed Ruff. Maine. Also 
present were salesmen, bookers and 
sales managers from the exchanges. 



Newman in London 

Loxdox. July 6. — Sol G. Newman, 
managing director for Radio here, is 
back from New York and the com- 
pany's Chicago sales convention. 



Eastman Pfd. Up 2 on Big Board 

Net 

High Low Close Change Sales 

Consolidated Film Industries 3 3 3 — % 300 

Eastman Kodak 99 9854 9854 + % 300 

Eastman Kodak, pfd 145 145 145 +2 10 

Fox Film "A" 13 13 13 200 

Loew's. Inc : 28% 27% 28% + % 2.400 

Paramount Publix 3% 354 3% + % 6.600 

Fathe Exchange 2% 2% 2% — % 100 

Pathe Exchange "A" 20% 2054 20% + % 200 

RKO 2% 2% 2% 400 

Warner Bros 5% 5 5% + % 3,600 



Technicolor Off Vs on Curb 

Net 

High Low Close Change Sales 

Technicolor 1354 13 1354 — % 700 

Trans Lux , 154 154 154 100 

Bond Market Steady 



Net 

High Low Close Change Sales 

General Theatre Equipment 6s '40 8 7% 7% — % 6 

General Theatre Equipment 6s '40. ctf S S 8—54 1 

Loew's 6s '41. ww deb rights 101 10054 10054 — Vz 12 

Paramount Broadwav 554s '51 41% 41 41% 4 

Paramount F. L. 6s '47 49 4754 49 + 54 15 

Paramount Publix 554s '50 4954 4954 4954 + % 1 

Warner Bros. 6s '39. wd 5554 :"5 55 16 



Saturday, July 7, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Cleveland to 
Go Off Dual 
Bills Sunday 



. (Continued from page 1) 

is being adopted as a result of the bet- 
ter films movement. 

The local Parent-Teacher Ass'n. and 
Mothers' Clubs have also commended 
the change. 

After Sunday, the only dual houses 
in the Greater Cleveland area will be 
those opened after the signing of the 
agreement. Such houses will, of neces- 
sity, be operated by exhibitors new in 
the field, as the agreement provides 
that houses ooened at any later date 
by signers are also committed to sin- 
gle features. 

Exhibitors Hail Move 

The vast majority of exhibitors in the 
area are enthusiastic over the move. 
They plan to present Family Night 
programs over the week-ends, and to 
build their programs to suit each 
neighborhood. They expect losses at 
first. 

The feeling locally on single fea- 
tures is not entirely unanimous. There 
are some who feel that all of the the- 
atres cannot stand the financial strain 
of the change of policy. Some doubt 
, the agreement is 100 per cent bind- 
ing. Others express the opinion that 
a test case will soon be made in court. 

Distributors have been asked not to 
serve theatres playing dual bills. One 
major company has stated it will con- 
tinue to serve double feature houses 
when and as it sees fit. Independent 
distributors will also serve such houses. 

Opens With Duals 

The Temple Theatre, East 55th St. 
and Central Ave., closed for the past 
five years, was opened this week by 
Victor Wolcott with a double feature 
policy. Wolcott was not an exhibitor 
when the agreement was drafted, and 
consequently was not one of the 
signers. It is reported that other 
houses in the area, long closed, will 
open soon with a dual policy. 

This is not the first time that an 
effort has been made to eliminate duals 
in Greater Cleveland. Last year the 
movement was all but successful. In 
order to make it successful, it had to 
have the support of every theatre 
owner in the city. As soon as the 
agreement was signed by every sub- 
sequent run exhibitor member of the 
association, M. B. Horwitz, chairman 
of the committee, went to New York 
and secured the co-operation of the 
Loew. Warner and RKO circuits. 

When the single feature policy goes 
into effect next Sunday, Warner's 
Lake will close, to remain closed un- 
til the middle of August. 



Cleveland Flooded 
With Zone Plaints 



(Continued from pane 1) 

in the form of appeals from the lo- 
cal board's rulings upholding the 
new schedules, it was learned today. 

The local secretary of the clearance 
and zoning board has been instructed 
by John C. Flinn, executive secretary 
of Code Authority, to forward com- 
plete records and minutes of the com- 
plaints heard by the board to Code 
Authority for appeals committee hear- 
ings. 

The clearance and zoning schedule 
in effect here was agreed to as part 
of a settlement of a suit brought by 
subsequent runs against first run 
houses in 1932. The agreement does 
not expire until Dec. 31, next. 



John C. Flinn stated yesterday that 
the appeals on the Cleveland clear- 
ance and zoning rulings would be 
studied first by Campi's legal com- 
mittee at a meeting on Tuesday. The 
committee will determine whether it 
is necessary to obtain a court order 
to make the changes contained in the 
new schedule effective. 



Five Grievances to 
Los Angeles Board 

Los Angeles, July 6. — Five com- 
plaints have been added to the griev- 
ance board calendar. 

Robert F. Killeen. operating the Rex, 
Phoenix, charges Rickards & Mace with 
entering into an agreement with all major 
distributors for product covering second, 
third and fourth runs. He insists that with 
three changes a week they can't play them 
all. He also charges playing pictures with 
stage shows at 15 cents. 

Jennie H. Dodde, operating the Mission. 
Ventura, charges Principal Theatres and 
the West Coast American Amusement Co. 
with staging "Bank Nights" at the Ven- 
tura Theatre. 

John T. Rennie, Rennie. San Fernando, 
also has lodged a "Bank Night" complaint 
against Feldstein & Dietrich, operating the 
San Fernando. 

L. E. Funk, operating the Bellflower, 
Bellflower, has lodged a complaint charging 
false advertising of attractions at 15 cents 
before they are booked. His complaint is 
against Carl Young. Meralta, Downey. 

American Theatres, Inc., operating the 
Iris. Hollywood, charges F. W. C, United 
Westcoast Theatres and United Artists The- 
atres. Inc., with conspiring to block his 
buying of product. His house was formerly 
operated by F. W. C. and had plenty of 
pictures, he says, but since the lease was 
turned back to the present operator he 
can't get product. 



Cleveland Reports 
Warner-RKO Pool 

Cleveland, July 6. — Once more the 
rumor is rife Warners and RKO are 
pooling their Cleveland theatres in a 
buying arrangement. Last season sim- 
ilar rumors were abroad, but they 
never materialized. It is now said that 
Warners are dickering for the Allen, 
downtown first run independent house, 
and if they get it, will have three 
downtown outlets, the Hippodrome, 
Lake and Allen. 



Decision Withheld 
On Case at Sussex 

The Code Authority Appeals Com- 
mittee reserved decision yesterday on 
the clearance complaint of Sussex 
Amusement Co., Sussex, N. J., against 
the Strand and Ritz, Port Jervis, 
N. Y., which seeks a reduction of the 
latters' 30-day protection over Sussex. 

The local clearance and zoning- 
board here upheld the 30-day clear- 
ance, but the Campi advisory com- 
mittee recommended that it be re- 
duced to 14 days. The Campi appeals 
committee which heard the case yes- 
terday consisted of George Schaefer, 
chairman ; Harry Buxbaum and 
Joseph Seider. Three other cases 
scheduled for hearing by the appeals 
committee yesterday were postponed 
two weeks to permit parties involved 
to appear in person. 

Four cases are set for hearing Mon- 
day by a new appeals committee of 
which J. Robert Rubin is chairman. 



New Way Found to 
Enforce Moral Code 



Hollywood, July 6. — Joseph I. 
Breen outlined at a press conference 
today a new plan of enforcing the 
production code, effective July 15. It 
provides that all pictures released after 
that date must be passed by him in 
keeping with the strict letter of the 
code. If and when a film is passed 
the producer will be issued an en- 
graved certificate which will permit 
him to attach the official approval in- 
signia on the main title of the pic- 
ture. 

The local rotating jury of pro- 
ducers to sustain or reject any deci- 
sion made by Breen will be aban- 
doned. Breen, as director of the pro- 
duction code administration, will have 
the only and final word in ruling 
on violations of the code. If a pro- 
ducer thinks his decision is wrong he 
mav appeal to the board of directors 
of the M. P. P. D. A. in New York. 

This service is available to non- 
members of the organization, but is 
not compulsory as in the case of mem- 
bers. Many independents are already 
submitting scripts as a protection 
against violating the code. Scripts be- 
fore going into production will be 
scrutinized more carefully than before, 
it is said. 

The Hays office today stated more 
than 260 scripts considered for filming 
during 1933 were rejected under the 
self-regulatory measures of producers 
as contained in the code of ethics 
drafted in 1930. 



No Code Hearings, 
States Rosenblatt 

(Continued from pane 1) 

administrator that while some recom- 
mendations for amendment are pend- 
ing, they are purely "pro forma," re- 
lating to budgetary matters, and will 
not require public discussion. 



Clearances Are Set 
Around Glens Falls 

Albany, July 6. — Clearances have 
been set for Glens Falls and the sur- 
rounding territory. The new sched- 
ule was set up as a result of a com- 
plaint of Frederick W. Mausert. 
State, Glens Falls, against the Para- 
mount and Rialto, first run, and the 
Empire, second run. 

The new schedule follows : Glens 
Falls — 45 days for first runs over sec- 
ond runs ; 14 days for second runs 
over third runs ; 14 days for first 
runs over Hudson Falls. Hudson 
Falls — 14 days over Fort Edward. 
Glens Falls — seven days for first runs 
over Schuylerville, Whitehall, Gran- 
ville, Luzerne and Chestertown. 



1TO A to Have 
Only Barrow's 
Moral Support 



(Continued from page 1) 

to independent factions attempting to 
obtain changes in the code, Darrow 
said that he had not agreed to align 
himself officially with the I. T. O. A. 
or any other industry faction. 

"Statements that I would do so," 
Darrow said, "must have been the re- 
sult of assumptions based on my well 
known feelings in the matter. The in- 
dependent exhibitors have, and will 
continue to have, my moral support in 
their fight against the motion picture 
code. Anything I can do to help them 
as a friendly advisor I will do gladly, 
but I have given up the practice of 
law and I will not take any active or 
official part in their opposition to the 
code." 

Darrow said he was leaving for 
Chicago today and that he might take 
a European trip in the near future, but 
was not decided yet on the latter move. 

Mason to Go Ahead 

Lowell B. Mason, former counsel 
for the Darrow Review Board, who, 
with Harry Brandt, I. T. O. A. presi- 
dent, told 100 exhibitors at an I. T. 

0. A. luncheon meeting at the Astor, 
Thursday, that Darrow's services 
would be given to independents with- 
out remuneration, indicated yesterday 
that he, himself, would go ahead with 
his plans for serving with I. T. O. A. 
and cooperating independent organiza- 
tions in their code tussle. 

Mason left for Washington yester- 
day to wind up affairs of the review 
board, which was abolished by execu- 
tive order July 1, saying that he would 
return Monday for further conferences 
with Brandt and Milton C. Weisman, 

1. T. O. A. attorney. 

Questioned about the Darrow denial 
that he, Darrow, would lead the I. T. 
O. A. code fight, Weisman said that 
he had "just talked to Darrow and he 
doesn't think it jvould be seemly of 
him to step right out of the review 
board into a particular contest which 
figured in his official activities. How- 
ever, he believes the I. T. O. A. fight 
against the code to be a good one." 

Darrow declined to comment yes- 
terday on courses open to independents 
in their efforts to obtain changes in 
the code and was petulant and brusque 
when asked his opinion of the inde- 
pendents' chances of obtaining the code 
relief they seek. 

"I can't answer that," he replied. 



Proposed Kid Shows 
Stir N. O. Curiosity 

New Orleans, July 6. — Films for 
children and parents are to be shown 
in the courtyard of Beauregard House 
by the Louisiana Educational Ass'n. 
As this comes under the head of 
competition with established theatres 
there is some curiosity as to where 
the films will be obtained, if they are 
of an entertainment nature. 



Columbia Men Off 
For Chicago Meet 

(Continued from page 1) 

Abe Montague, Joe McConville, Rube 
Jackter, Louis Astor, Lou Weinberg, 
Maurice Grad, J. MacFarfland, A. 
Seligman, William Jaffe, Milt Han- 
nock and W. Brennan. Nate Spingold 
is already on the scene of action, and 
Henri Brunet left yesterday to make 
the preliminary arrangements. 



Alec B. Francis Dead 

Hollywood, July 6. — Alec B. Fran- 
cis, 65, veteran actor, died this after- 
noon at the Hollywood Hospital fol- 
lowing an operation earlier in the day. 
His widow survives. 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Saturday, July 7, 1934 



Short 
Subjects 



"La Cucaracha" 

(Radio-Technicolor Special) 

Hollywood, July 6. — Revolutionary 
in its color rendition and expression, 
"La Cucaracha" comes to the screen 
not only as an entertaining semi-fea- 
ture revealing a bit of Mexican folk 
song and drama, but as perhaps the 
most attractive color shown on the 
screen to date. 

Not once did the usual red, green or 
yellow primaries intrude across the 
action to give jitters to the eye. 

Beautiful and smooth, revealing tints 
and tones heretofore deemed impossi- 
ble via film and projection, the effect 
of harmony created is like a series of 
oil paintings done in the manner of 
the old masters. 

All hands who worked toward the 
achievement of these color effects 
merit high praise from the industry. If 
their experiments make this color com- 
mercially feasible, the industry should 
see a great deal more color film used 
in forthcoming productions. 

Robert Edmond Jones, artist for- 
merly employed in creating stage set- 
tings, is responsible for the effects, the 
grouping, the color harmony, and the 
dovetailing of the drama with primary 
or secondary rolors as the mood de- 
manded. 

Lloyd Corrigan directed with vigor, 
securing added emotional responses by 
shrewd use of dramatic motivations 
and color relations in mass as well as 
individual action. 

Story by John Twist and Jack 
Wagner. 

Photography by Ray Rennahan 
blends light and color vibration for 
audience reaction. 

Performers enact their roles with 
vitality and humor — Steffi Duna, Don 
Alvarado and Paul Porcasi bringing 
splendid talents to their roles. 

"La Cucaracha," Mexican folk song, 
also employed in "Viva Villa," height- 
ens the eye and ear technique by its 
challenging refrain. 

Both Jock Whitney and Pioneer 
Pictures should receive grateful dec- 
orations from an industry that has 
waited too long for such gorgeous 
color filming. Running time, 28 mins. 



MOTION PICTURE DAILY* 
HOLLYWOOD PREVIEW 



"Paris Interlude" 

(M-G-M) 

Hollywood, July 6. — Chronicling the buzzing circle of American 
writers, scribblers and petty chiselers on the fringe of Paris' Latin Quar- 
ter, this production also probes emotional regions. 

On the exciting night of Lindbergh's Paris arrival, we meet Madge 
Evans, an apple-cheeked miss from the middle west; Otto Kruger, 
veteran air ace and topnotch correspondent; Robert Young, Kruger's 
assistant; Una Merkel, a hard-boiled fashion expert, and Edward 
Brophy, a hack writer. The action centers around Ted Healy's bar. 

The story concerns Madge's love for Otto and Young's friendship 
toward her when Kruger goes to China. On the night Young and 
Miss Evans are to marry, Kruger, previously reported killed by bandits, 
returns, but sensing the romantic situation, makes a sacrifice fadeout. 

Pleasant heart interest runs through the production. The cast is 
interesting and competent but the characters, while real, are somewhat 
unattractive. 

Ed Marins' first major film direction is especially commendable. 
The picture is from a play by S. J. and Laura Perelman, with the 
adaptation by Wells Root. 

When trimmed, the production should be pleasing as a programmer 
for subsequent runs and neighborhoods. Running time, 86 minutes. 



The Scarlet Letter 



"Roamin' Vandals" 

(M-G-M) 

Any audience should be highly 
amused at the antics of Patsy Kelly, 
Lillian Miles and Eddie Foy, Jr., in 
this short. As members of a medicine 
show traveling in the West they run 
into difficulties with various sheriffs 
because of Miss Kelly's habit of 
punching people in the eye. The 
windup is a chase that is really funny. 
Running time, 20 mins. 



"Paramount Pictorial" 

(Paramount 3-10) 
Appropriate in the timeliness of the 

opening scenes showing the proper 
types of glasses for serving liquors, 
this short is entertaining. Various 
types of easily tamed birds are next 
seen, with the reel winding up show- 
ing Con Conrad, the song writer, and 
Del Campo, the radio singer, featur- 
ing Conrad's works. Running time, 
10 mins. 



(Majestic) 

Hollywood, July 6. — This filmization of Nathaniel Hawthorne's 
classic, completed in 14 days, has all the earmarks of a major studio 
production. Although its box-office reception may be dubious and ex- 
ploitation is necessary, shearing for speed should make this able to 
stand alone on any bill. 

The setting is Massachusetts' early Puritan period. Colleen Moore, 
guilty of social sins, receives the official, narrow-minded reprimand and 
wears the shameful red letter publicly. Hardie Albright, youthful village 
pastor, and the unsanctioned father of Miss Moore's daughter, Cora 
Sue Collins, is unable to confess his guilt. Henry B. Walthall, eminent 
doctor and husband of the shamed girl, returns after a two-year absence 
seeking the unlawful husband. He finds the pastor, taunts him unmerci- 
fully until Albright's conscience drives him to a public confession and 
an untimely death. The girl lives down her disgrace and is received by 
the townspeople. 

All performances are good, particularly Albright's. Alan Hale and 
William T. Kent make a fine comedy team. Their whispers of love 
m a courting scene are riotous. Bob Vignola's direction is splendid. 
The screen play, by Leonard Fields and David Silverstein, is well knit. 
The photography of James S. Brown, Jr., is noteworthy. Running time, 
80 minutes. 



Looking 'Em Over 



NEA in Resolution 
Hits Unclean Films 



(Continued from page 1) 

XEA to "other organizations, educa- 
tional, patriotic and religious, in de- 
manding a high type of moving pic- 
ture for the boys and girls of Amer- 
ica. 

"The association hereby records it- 
self as wholly in sympathy with the 
current movement to bring about re- 
form in the moving picture industry 
and to encourage clean and moral 
films," it was declared. "The asso- 
ciation condemns the showing of stor- 
ies or scenes which threaten the in- 
tegrity of the American home, ridi- 
cule sacred institutions, glorify law- 
lessness and make juvenile delinquency 
a subject of jest or an incitement to 
imitation. The practice of block 
booking of pictures to exhibitors, 
whereby worthy pictures and objec- 
tionable ones must be taken in lots, is 
recognized as largely responsible for 
the unsavory character of contempo- 
rary moving picture programs and is 
condemned without reservation." 



No Circuit Closing 
Up in Wilmington 

(Continued from page 1) 

they have no immediate plans for clos- 
ing as a protest over the boycott in 
Philadelphia. 

The attitude of the Catholics in 
Wilmington at the present time does 
not tend to a general boycott. Herein 
the situation differs from Philadelphia. 
Titles of pictures which Catholics do 
not believe should be seen are given 
out. 

Recently 200 letters were mailed by 
girls of the Ursuline Academy to va- 
rious producers asking them to pro- 
duce cleaner pictures. 

According to the president of the 
I.M.P.T.O.A. of Delaware and the 
Eastern Shore of Maryland, indepen- 
dents in this area may be forced to 
close if Philadelphia houses close, be- 
cause of release date agreements on 
pictures, but apparently Warners and 
Loew's have no immediate plans for 
closing. 



"Cross Streets" 

(Invincible-State Rights) 

Trite, packed with implausible situations and not always happily 
cast, this Invincible production is decidedly mediocre. Some of the 
names in the cast may help the neighborhood exhibitor make a go of the 
film. Among them are John Mack Brown, Claire Windsor of silent 
picture fame, Anita Louise, Matty Kemp, Kenneth Thomson. Niles 
Welch and Josef Swickard. 

Again it is the story of the brilliant young man who takes to drink 
over a blighted romance and turns his life into a failure. The young 
man in this instance is Brown, just being graduated from medical 
school. The girl of his heart jilts him and off he goes to the old bottle. 
When he causes a patient to die under the knife, he renounces medicine 
and becomes a bum. 

He has a chance to redeem himself when through a bluff he has him- 
self appointed in charge of the medical school at his Alma Mater. 
But at a dinner in his honor he messes up everything by revealing the 
truth about himself. To complicate matters he falls in love with the 
daughter of the woman who gave him the air. In the end he dies after 
being shot by the woman's jealous husband. 

Frank Strayer directed. Running time, 69 minutes. 



Catholic Bishop Calls 
On Will Hays to Quit 

Fall River, July 6. — The resigna- 
tion of Will Hays was demanded to- 
day by Bishop James E. Cassidy, 
apostolic administrator of the Fall 
River Catholic Diocese, on the ground 
that the M. P. P. D. A. head had 
been "false to the trust imposed on 
him" as a champion of clean films. 

The prelate charged Hays with be- 
ing "a cobetrayer with the movie in- 
dustry of the sacred rights of par- 
ents to protection of the morals of 
their children." 



Houston Protestants 
Join in Film Drive 

Houston, July 6. — Protestant 
churches here have joined the Catho- 
lic drive against immoral pictures. The 
Methodist and Baptist pastors' confer- 
ences, meeting separately, indorsed the 
Catholic Legion of Decency. 

Each Protestant body ordered 15,- 
000 pledge cards to be distributed 
among church members, by which the 
signers pledge themselves "not to at- 
tend indecent and salacious moving 
pictures." The Catholic churches 
have distributed 20,000 pledge cards. 



The Leading 

Newspaper 

Motion^ 

Picture 

Industry 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Alert, 




Intelligent 


cfrid' % 




Faithfu 


| 


Service 


to 


the Industry 


in All 




Branches 



VOL. 36. NO. 6 



NEW YORK, MONDAY, JULY 9, 1934 



TEN CENTS 



Hays Reports 
Studios Ban 
Many Scripts 

Rejections in Addition to 
260 by MPPDA 



Hollywood. July S— That pro- 
ducers last year rejected many scripts 
of their own free will without pres- 
sure from the Hays office in their 
desire to keep within the provisions 
of the moral code for the industry is 
revealed by the M.P.P.D.A. in making 
public here a report on its activities 
for the past year. 

Scripts rejected by the producers 
themselves were additional to more 
than 260 turned down by the Hays 
organization. Of this number 160 
were rejected here and the balance by 
the New York office. 

The report estimates the average 
number of basic changes in script 
treatments at 1,200 yearly, with the 
total of less important changes, such 

{Continued on page 6) 



Columbia Starting 
2nd Meeting Today 

Chicago, July 8— Over 100 Colum- 
bia men, including a contingent from 
Xew York headquarters, are here for 
the company's western sales conven- 
tion, which opens at the Medinah Club, 
Monday. The same procedure as that 
which prevailed at Atlantic City last 
week, will be observed here. Jack 
l ohn will open the meeting and then 

(Continued on page 4) 



Duals to Go Within 
Six Months — Roach 

Hollywood, July 8.— Hal Roach 
iredicts the end of duals within six 
nonths. He bases his prediction to a 
ireat extent on the growing tendency 
if the public to be fed up with double 
>ills and the keeping of children too 
ong at matinee sessions, causing wor- 
-iment to their parents. 



5-Centers Socked 

Toledo, O., July 8.— Twen- 
ty-four months' protection 
against five-cent houses has 
been granted to first-run ex- 
hibitors here in a clearance 
and zoning schedule for 1934- 
35 proposed by the clearance 
and zoning board. Five-cent 
houses have been a thorn in 
the side of Toledo exhibition 
for several years. 



Move to Cut Agents ' Pay 
To Salary in First Week 



Hollywood, July 8. — Exhibitors 
who have often accused Hollywood 
agents as being at least partly respon- 
sible for boosting artists' salaries will 
be interested in a current movement to 
limit agents' commissions to the first 
week's salary of any engagement se- 
cured. This is the system that applies 
to agents in other vocations. 

The present state labor laws entitle 



picture agents to 10 per cent of a full 
year's salary, but agents have seen the 
handwriting on the wall and have set 
up complete financial as well as man- 
agerial representation by handling per- 
sonal affairs, such as income tax, in- 
vestments, family budgets and in many 
instances legal affairs and publicity. 
The problem of exacting 10 per cent 

(Continued on Mae 4) 



Chicago Gets 
Catholic O.K. 
For 52 Films 



Chicago, July 8. — In its first pam- 
phlet of current pictures designating 
qualifications demanded by the Catho- 
lic League of Decency the Chicago 
council labels 52 pictures as "suitable 
for Catholic patronage." Forty-one 
are termed "offensive in spots because 
they are suggestive, vulgar, sophisti- 
cated or lacking in decency." Thirty- 
one are banned outright as being 
"immoral and indecent and entirely 
unfit for Catholic patronage." 

The purpose of the bulletin is given 
is follows : 

"The Chicago council of the League 
of Decency plans to give this service 
to pastors of parishes, heads of schools 
md Catholic institutions and the vari- 
ous publications which reach our 
{Continued on page 6) 



Spot Clean Pictures 
In Counter-Campaign 

Bcffalo, July 8. — A strong bid for 
kid trade this summer is being made 
at Shea's Buffalo, which also is osten- 
la.tiously spotting clean pictures in a 
qutet counter-campaign against the 
church movement. 

"Baby, Take a Bow" will be fol- 
lowed by "The Circus Clown," both 
pictures which might not have been 
booked into the ace house in Western 
New York in other days. Stage acts 
and material are being closely scanned, 
too. 



Portland Goes Into 
12 Clearance Zones 

Portland, July 8. — Under the terms 
of the new clearance and zoning chart 
just made public the city is divided 
into 12 zones and four price classifi- 
cations. 

First runs charging 25 cents get 35 

(Continued on page 4) 



Church's Ban 
Hits All Film 
In St. Louis 



The Catholic boycott has been ex- 
tended to St. Louis, where all product 
has been banned. So far as can be 
learned, this marks the second large 
city to be so designated, the other be- 
ing Philadelphia. 

Agreed that pictures held objec- 
tionable should be cleaned up, the 
Catholic campaign throughout the 
United States, united in purpose, is 
assuming several forms. One calF 
for publication of both "bla.ck" and 
"white" lists. Another provides for 
publication of "white" lists, which are 
approved films, only. A third method 
publishes the names of offending pro- 
ducers, but not the titles of pictures. 

Cities where Catholic publication? 
concentrate on "black" lists only are 

(continued on page 6) 



K. C. Jewish Editor 
Against Film Curbs 

Kansas City, July 8. — The first 
local Jewish expression on the clean 
film crusade is against curtailment of 
the liberties of the screen. The Kan- 
sas City Jewish Chronicle, in edi- 
torial comment, declares : 

"Some folks have the idea that all 
'bottled entertainment' comes from 
the distilleries, but if the present move 
of church groups for 'cleaning up' the 
movies has its sway, we'll have cler- 
gymen supervising our entertainment 
to the extent of bottling up whatever 
they regard as unsuited for our pe- 

(Continued on page 6) 



St. Louis Board Has 
Non-Compliance Case 

St. Louis, July 8. — Gaylord W. 
Jones, operator of the Rialto, Granite 
City, 111., has been cited to appear be- 

(Continucd on page 4) 



Natan Amazed 
At Waste of 
Dual Billing 

Cause of Overproduction 
Here, He Declares 



The economic structure under which 
the American industry permits double 
features at 10 and 15 cents is not only 
responsible for overproduction in 
Hollywood but is also "stupid and 
wasteful," declared Bernard Natan of 
the Pathe Natan organization, France's 
largest exhibitor, producer and dis- 
tributor, as he sailed for Paris on the 
lie dc France Saturday morning. 

Natan, whose views were expounded 
through Henri Diamant Berger, 
French producer and director, since 
the former speaks little English, ex- 
pressed himself as "amazed" that the 
industry here should allow the sale of 
its product on a basis which, it was 
his opinion, makes it impossible to 
clear negative costs. Berger, inci- 
dentally, echoed Natan's slant. 

"I cannot comprehend such a 
policy," it was said for Natan. "Two 
features, plus a cartoon and a news- 

(Contiiiued on page 4) 



Vaudeville in Cincy 
Shrinks to One Spot 

Cincinnati, July 8.— Vaudeville 
has gone out at the Strand, down- 
town independent, and will be replaced 
with double features at a 15-cent mati- 
nee rate for any seat. Night prices 
will be 15 and 20 cents for balcony 
and lower floor. 

This is the first house here to go to 
duals as a regular policy, and leaves 
the RKO G rand the only downtown 
spot to play vaudefilm. 



F. & M. Plans More 
Middle West Units 

St. Louis, July 8— With definite 
plans under way to expand in the mid- 
dle west, F. & M. will make St. Louis 
its theatre stronghold. 

Five houses in this city are now 
(Continued on page 4) 



Pins and Needles 

Chicago, July 8. — Will hilari- 
ous patrons, equipped with 
rubber bands and pins for 
sling shots, make Sally Rand's 
bubble the object of their 
hilarity? Described as a 
bubble, Sally actually uses a 
balloon. The issue has Fair 
officials in the Italian Village 
concerned. 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Monday, July 9, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



(Registered U. S. Patent Office) 



Vol. 36 



July 9, 1934 



No. 6 




Martin Quigley 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 
MAURICE KANN 

Editor 
JAMES A. CRON 
Advertising Manager Z* 



Published daily except Sunday and noli 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub- 
sidiary oi <Juigley Publications, Inc., 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown. 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 179U Broadway, New 
York. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Cable ad 
dress "Quigpubco, New York." All con- 
tents copyrighted 1934 by Motion Piciuie 
Daily, Inc. Address all correspondence to 
the New York Office. Other (Juigley pub 
lications: MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 
BETTER THEATRES, THE MOTION 
PICTURE ALMANAC and THE CHI 
CAGOAN. 

Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Life 
Building, Vine and Yucca Streets, Victor 
M. Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 407 
South Dearborn Street, Edwin 6. Clif- 
ford, manager; London Bureau: Remo 
House, 310 Regent St., London, W. 1, 
Bruce Allan, Representative. Cable address: 
"Ouigpubco, London"; Berlin Bureau: 
Berlin - Tempelhof , Kaiserin - Augustastrasse 
28, Joachim K. Rutenberg, Representative; 
Paris Bureau: 19, Rue de la Gourdes 
Noues, Pierre Autre, Representative; Rome 
Bureau: Viale Gorizia, Vittorio Malpassuti, 
Representative; Sydney Bureau: 102 Sus- 
sex Street, Cliff Holt, Representative; Mex- 
ico City Bureau: Apartado 269, James 
Lockhart, Representative; Glasgow Bureau: 
86 Dundrennan Road, G. Holmes, Repre- 
sentative; Budapest Bureau: 11 Olasz 
Kasor 17, Endre Hei'esi, Representative. 

Entered as second class matter January 
4, 1926 at the Post Office at New York 
City, N. Y., under Act of Match 3, 1S79. 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada $15 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 



Television Causes 
Chicago Union Row 

Chicago, July 8. — First skirmish in 
tomorrow's battle of which branch of 
organized labor will control television 
was staged at the world's fair this 
week when agents of the operators' 
union, headed by Tom Maloy, clashed 
with representatives of the electrical 
workers union over the question of 
which group should operate the tele- 
vision exhibit at the electrical building. 

While a couple of police sergeants 
looked on representatives of the two 
unions held a pow-wow. Representatives 
of the electrical group stuck to their 
guns, as it were, informing Ralph 
O'Hara, business agent, and Emmett 
Quinn, steward of the operators' local, 
that they were keeping their men on 
the job. That's where the situation 
stands — for the time being. 



Harry Pollard, Actor 
And Director, Dead 

Hollywood, July 8. — Harry Pollard, 
55, is dead of a heart attack. He had 
been ill for six weeks. 

Pollard appeared in several silent 
films with Margarita Fisher, his wife, 
and directed "The Prodigal," "The 
Leather Pushers," "Show Boat," 
"Uncle Tom's Cabin," "Shipmates" 
and some of the "Cohens and Kellys" 
series for Universal. 



Insiders' Outlook 



HAVING said little or nothing 
during his stay here, Ber- 
nard Natan unloaded plenty Sat- 
urday, embarked on the lie de 
France for that dear Paris and 
left behind him an interesting 
chapter in the furiously discussed 
and entirely unsolved double fea- 
ture situation. His observation 
was that merchandise is- being 
marketed at prices which do not 
allow the producer to come out ; 
that admissions are deplorably 
low and that pandering to the 
double feature market is respon- 
sible for overproduction and Hol- 
lywood's unswerving allegiance to 
its years' old numerical stand- 
ards. In short, the economic 
system prevailing here is wasteful 
and pediculous. . . . 

T 

There are manv who will agree 
with Natan. What to do about 
doubles has been dissected and 
put together so often and at such 
length there would appear no 
noint in reviving a bugaboo in 
hot or any other kind of weather. 
What is curious about the situ- 
ation, however, is the public sen- 
timents expressed by the all high- 
est in the industry and the reverse 
practised by their own theatres. 
The reason, like the argument, of 
course is blamed on the competi- 
tion. Actually, the reason is a 
lack of backbone to step where 
others won't or don't care to 
tread, plus the natural ambition of 
sales departments to maintain ac- 
counts at their present level, 
whatever that may be. ... 
T 

This is the explanation for the 
attitude privately expressed by 
sales managers who, in many 
instances, fail to iibe in their own 
noint of view with that expressed 
bv the heads of their organiza- 
tions. Tt seems logical enough to 
turn to the representative com- 
panies in the business for any 
moves in the elimination of 
doubles, if the ambition to actu- 
allv cut them out is sincere. Why, 
it has been asked, should the 



smaller fry in exhibition and dis- 
tribution both walk in where the 
major, vested interests haven't 
the guts to stride? They ask, 
but they don't get any answer 
because there is none that will 
hold water. . . . 

T 

The latter day development on 
duals and their end fits into clear- 
ance under the code. The sug- 
gestion made at the M.P.T.O.A. 
convention in Los Angeles in 
April by Morgan Walsh of San 
Francisco that zoning be set up 
with admissions as the first con- 
sideration seems to be bearing 
fruit, whether through his utter- 
ances or because others else- 
where, mysteriously enough, got 
the same idea about the same 
time. This explains how it is 
that houses showing doubles are 
shoved far down the line in clear- 
ances, their, let's assume, 25-cent 
admissions being computed as 
12}/2-cent shows because they 
show two pictures instead of 
one. . . . 

T 

The program is destined to run 
into trouble, perhaps considerable 
trouble. Several distributors — 
they are important — who have op- 
posed restrictions on duals from 
the days of code formulation in 
Washington until now are not 
inclined to sit back under clear- 
ance schedules as they are piecing 
themselves together in many key 
territories. Clearance, circuits' 
delight as it has been small oper- 
ators' despair for years, was 
expected to be reduced, not in- 
creased under the code. Is that 
happening, questioners are ask- 
ing. Replying to their own 
queries, they emphasize that it is 
not. Talk of suits and appeals to 
Campi consequently are rifting 
the sultry ozone. . . . 

T 

Now back to Natan. He be- 
lieves producers would be better 
off concentrating on 12 big ones 
a year and envisages longer runs 
down the line as a direct result. 



Most Stocks Gain in Quiet Day 



High 

30 
98'/ 
283^ 



"olumbia Pictures, vtc 

Eastman Kodak 

Loew's, Inc 

Paramount, cU AVt 

Pathe Exchange 254 

Pathe Exchange "A" 213^ 

RKO VA 

Warner Bros SVs 



Low 

29 

98'/ 

28'4 

2'4 

2m 

2'/k 



Close 

30 

9SV 2 

28'4 

45* 

254 
2Ws 
214 
5Vs 



Net 
Change 

+2 



+ V 

+ Vs 

+ Vi 

+ Vs 



Trans Lux Only Curb Opener 



Trans Lux 



High 

■ 15/6 



Low 

m 



Close 



Net 
Change 

+ Vs 



Warner Bonds U p One Point 



Miss Henry for "Babes" 

Hollywood, July 8. — Paramount 
has loaned Charlotte Henry to Hal 
Roach for the role of Little Bo Peep 
in "Babes in Toyland." 



High Low 

General Theatre Equipment 6s '40 8 7% 

General Theatre Equipment 6s '40. ctf ~Vs 7V% 

Loew's 6s '41, ex war 100^ 10054 

Paramount F. L. 6s '47 49 49 

Paramount Publix 5%s '50 4854 48^ 

Warner Bros. 6s '39. wd 56 55 



Close 



100J4 
49 
48M 
56 



Net 
Change 

- 54 

— H 



Sales 

200 
100 
600 
13.200 
800 
40' 1 
600 
2,400 



Sales 

500 



Sales 



+1 



This brought to mind what Irving 
Thalberg told us at lunch in his 
bungalow on the Metro lot a few 
weeks ago. "The exhibitor has 
nothing at all to do with it. The 
fault is Hollywood's and from 
that there can be no escape. What 
difference can it make to the 
theatre operator if he changes 
once a week or more often or 
less? Don't you think, for ex- 
ample, that Ed Bowes at the 
Capitol in New York would 
welcome the type of product that 
would permit him to hold a given 
picture for three weeks? Show- 
men want real attractions and 
they'll run them as long as thev 
will hold up. The trouble is they 
are not getting enough of that 
kind of picture." . . . 

▼ 

Thalberg, at the time and no 
doubt at this minute as well, saw 
the future of the business build- 
ing on super attractions only. 
That is why he proposes confining 
his activities to 10 or 12 a year 
and probably 1 ess. We asked him 
what about pictures to supply 
theatre changes. He replied there 
would not be so many if product 
—the right kind— were furnished. 
We asked him what he saw in 
the crystal for Hollywood. He 
replied: "The button makers will 
continue to make buttons instead 
of pictures and the real builders 
of attractions, real pictures." 
Thalberg, incidentally, was the 
only major executive in Holly- 
wood who assumed the stand that 
the answer was entirely out of 
exhibition's province and one for 
production to grapple with. Any 
other argument that theatres 
wouldn't allow producers to make 
less pictures because of current 
policies he regarded as an alibi 
advanced by Hollywood for the 
continued production of junk 
attractions. . . . 

Elsewhere today much fuss 
may be made of the fuss Milton 
C. Weisman. attornev for the 
New York I.T.O.A., endeavored 
to stir up Saturday morning. 
He plans suits, does Weisman. 
against this one and that and all 

(Continued on pane 6) 



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MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Monday, July 9, 1934 



INatan Amazed 
At Waste of 
Dual Billing 



(Continued from page 1) 

reel and often more, at 15 cents and, 
in some cases, at 10 cents, to me repre- 
sents an unexplainable business me- 
thod. Your low prices of theatre 
admission are amazing as well. I am 
convinced that overproduction in Hol- 
lywood is traceable to the demands 
made by the double feature market. 
As a result of observations gathered 
here, Pathe Natan has come to the 
definite conclusion that the future lies 
in fewer pictures, better made." 

In keeping with his decision, there- 
fore, Natan is returning to Paris with 
the fixed determination of trimming 
his company's current 31 features to 
26 for the 1934-35 season, but increas- 
ing the budget. He also declared he 
intended using the influence of his 
organization to spread this plan among 
other French producing companies. 

"How much better it would be for 
each major company to concentrate on 
12 big pictures a year. Where product 
now gets a few days' run, it would run 
a week. Where it runs a week, it 
might easily run two and three. This 
type of attraction not only would, 
satisfy domestic demands, but the 
entire world as well," he added. 

May Influence French Industry 

It is possible that Natan's intention 
of influencing the French industry to 
veer more sharply from a quantity to 
a quality basis may develop. Pathe 
Natan controls 250 theatres in France. 
Of this number, 82 are owned out- 
right. The others are tied in on a 
"program" basis which provides Pathe 
Natan is to supply product and for 
which it gets a percentage of the gross 
without participation in actual owner- 
ship. 

Natan and Berger visited Holly- 
wood, primarily on an inspection 
tour, but there signed Charles Boyer, 
who played the lead in "Caravan" for 
Fox, to return to Paris. 

They will return here in September 
for the opening of their own offices in 
the French Building in Rockefeller 
Center. American universities have 
been petitioning them for French pic- 
tures, it was explained, as a means of 
furthering the instruction of French 
students. Pathe Natan expects to meet 
these requests, perhaps through a 17.5 
millimeter machine. 

Asserting there are 100,000 French- 
born men and women here, as well as 
500,000 French-Canadians across the 
line, the company anticipates going in 
for limited showings of its product 
through regular theatre channels 
beginning late this year or early next. 



F. & M. Plans More 
Middle West Units 

(Continued from page 1) 

under the circuit's banner and addi- 
tions are planned here. New acquisi- 
tions will be in the form of neighbor- 
hood and subsequent run houses. 

Harry C. Arthur and Marco Wolf 
are due here from New York about 
Thursday to set up operation plans 
for the Ambassador, Missouri and 
Grand Central. 



Move to Cut Agents 9 Pay 
To Salary in First Week 



(Continued from page 1 ) 

commissions each week of a year as 
against only the first week's salary of 
any contract negotiated has been dis- 
cussed at meetings of the Agency 
Code Committee, according to reliable 
sources. 

Proponents of the new plan claim 
clients not wishing to avail themselves 
of the complete agency service should 
be compelled to pay only the first 
week's salary. One agent stated that 
if a one-week salary commission is 
imposed by law, he will sign clients 
on 10-week periods. 

A local court recently established 
a precedent on agents' commissions by 
ruling in the case of Shirley Temple 
vs. Bernard that he could collect on 
five per cent of her salary. The agent 
later dropped his client, claiming the 
expense entailed on the basis of $150 
per week was insufficient. Later Fox 
raised Shirley's salary to $1,000 weekly 
without the aid of an agent. 



Portland Goes Into 
12 Clearance Zones 

(Continued from page 1) 

days over second runs ; 56 over third ; 
70 over the city break at 25 cents, the 
date on which films are available for 
first run in each zone ; 105 days over 
subsequents at 20 cents, and 161 over 
subsequents at 15 cents. 

For first runs charging 30 to 35 
cents, the schedule follows : 49 over 
second runs ; 70 over third runs ; 84 
over city break, all at 25 cents; 119 
over subsequents at 20 cents; 175 over 
subsequents at 15 cents. For first runs 
charging 40 cents to 55 cents the 
clearances in the same classifications 
are: 56, 77, 91, 126 and 182; for first 
runs at 60 cents to 75 cents, 63, 84. 
98, 133 and 189. Any picture run at 
10 cents becomes available six months 
after the 15-cent break. 

Pictures with stage shows go into 
the next lower clearance classification. 

In the first zone are the Broadway. 
Music Box, Pantages, Paramount and 
United Artists ; second zone. Blue 
Mouse, Capitol. Hollywood. Liberty 
and Oriental ; third zone ; Bluebird. 
Nob Hill and State. 



Chicago Police Put 
Stop to Giveaways 

Chicago. July 8. — In an order to 
local exhibitors Harry M. Costello. 
lieutenant in charge of crime preven- 
tion definitely places the taboo on 
giving away of merchandise or hold- 
ing various forms of lottery in thea- 
tres. The order states that this is a 
violation of the city code. 

Lieutenant Costello's letter states 
that the action is taken as a result of 
complaints received from merchants. 

In a few instances where exhibitors 
have a series of prizes to complete 
sriving away Lieut. Costello has in- 
dicated that he will grant them until 
Tulv 15 to get rid of their mer- 
chandise. 



Chicago Zoning to 
Get a New Hearing 

Chicago, July 8. — The local zoning 
system will be subjected to fire in a 
meeting of the clearance and zoning 
board to be held July 12 to which all 
exhibitors in the city and metropolitan 
area have been invited. 

The meeting is a result of com- 
plaint against the' present setup 
launched by B. & K. 

B. & K. is asking for further pro- 
tection beginning with the first week 
of release. The circuit wants a "dead 
week" inserted between each release 
week following the down town run 
period of nine weeks. This would be 
equivalent to an extra seven days' pro- 
tection for all theatres. 

Just what the attitude of theatres 
generally will be is not known yet. 
Aaron Saperstein of Allied admitted 
that he could not give any indication 
of how his members felt about the pro- 
posed change until he had gathered 
their views at a meeting. Even some 
of the circuits, such as Essaness, are 
not sure how the change would affect 
them. 

If the B. & K. plan goes through it 
will mean a complete revamping of 
the present zoning plan. It is pre 
dieted that it will be subjected to 
plenty of sharpshooting from some 
of the smaller houses. 

Local exchange managers have in- 
dicated that they favor the plan only 
if it will bring about an increase in 
matinee prices. They point out that 
approximately 70 per cent of the 
business is done up to 6 :30 o'clock. 

Exhibitors who desire to be heard 
have been asked to notify the secre- 
tary in advance. Jack Rose is sched- 
uled to preside. 



Pettijohn Makes Denial 

Charles C. Pettijohn on Saturday 
denied he had ever discussed with 
Clarence Darrow and the National 
Recovery Review Board anv plan to 
submit block booking and right to buy 
disputes to an arbitration board of 
nine. Lowell Mason, former board 
member, and Harry Brandt, president 
of the I.T.O.A.. on Thursday declared 
Pettijohn had sat in on such a plan 
in Washington. 



< Purely 
Personal ► 



KATHERINE CARRINGTON and 
Arthur Schwartz were married 
Saturday in the home of Lawrence 
Fektig in Great Neck. Miss Car- 
ringtox is an actress. Schwartz is 
the composer of several musical 
revues and co-worker in such endeavors 
with Howard Dietz. 

Gradwell Sears, now a Kentucky 
colonel along with the others, is back 
from Warner conventions and the 
coast. 

Mignon C. Eberhart's mystery 
novel. "White Cockatoo," has been ac- 
quired by Warners. 

Charles David, studio manager for 
Pathe Natan in Paris, is due in from 
Hollywood momentarily. 

Diana Wynyakd is off on that 
English holiday. 



Big Film Group Sails 

Film people were numerous on the 
He de France when it sailed Satur- 
day. Among them were Lilian Bond. 
Joseph C. Bernard. French producer : 
Pernard Natan, head of Pathe-Natan ; 
Daniele Parola, French star ; Rufus 
LeMaire and Mrs. LeMaire ; Alphonse 
Nehum and I. Woolfson, British pro- 
ducers, and Dave A. Enstein, Holly- 
wood agent, with Mrs. Epstein. 



Charter Kentucky Firm 

Louisville. -July 8.— The Stone 
Theatre, at Stone, Ky., has been in- 
cornorated with a capital stock of 
$1,000. by T. A. Obenshain, Allen 
Obenshain and Dr. C. C. Browning. 



Plan Two New Branches 

The American Federation of Actors 
will organize two more branches in 
the middle west, according to Ralnh 
Whitehead, executive secretary. The 
Chicago branch will get under way 
today with a mass-meeting, and an- 
other will be started in Milwaukee on 
July 13. 



Columbia Starting 
2nd Meeting Today 

(Continued from page 1) 

turn over the program to Abe Monta- 
gue, general sales manager. 
Present from the field are : 

Chicago — Phil Dunas, manager; C. W. 
Phillips. G. St. Clair. T. Greenwood, F. 
Flaherty, A. Blumstein, J. Kaufman. J. 
Thoma. exploiteer. 

Denver — W. C. Ball, manager: J. F. 
Baker. B. M. Shooker. M. L. Mayer. 

Des Moines — Joe Levy, manager; A. P. 
Ableson, C. C. Brydon. O. L. Donelson. 

Detroit— C. H. Shalit, manager; M. E. 
Cohen. R. F. Cloud. J. M. .Mellon. G. L. 
McCoy. 

Indianapolis — M. Solomon, manager; H. 
Kaufman, \V. G. Craig, A. J. Geiman. 1. 
Hanower. 

Kansas City — Midwest Division Mgr. Max 
Roth, division manager: H. Tavlor. manager; 
L. E. Royster. W. Bradfield'. C. E. Rey- 
nolds, H. S. Stulz. 

Los Angeles — Jerome Safron. division 
manager; W. C. Riter. manager; H. Wein- 
berg, S. Nathanson, H. M. Lentz. N. New- 
man. 

Milwaukee — C. J. Ruby, manager; S. 
Schuster. M. Weisner. S. R. Chapman. L>. 
E. Pratt. 

Minneapolis — B. C. Marcus, manager; I. 
H. Jacobs. J. Kopald. W. T. Hickey. M. 
H. Evidon. A. L. Aved. 

Omaha — H. J. Chapman, manager; L. C. 
Hensler. I. M. Weiner. J. Rosenberg. 

Portland — J. R. Beale. manager; C. E. 
Tillman. W. T. Withers. 

Salt La c City — R. C. Hill, manager; C. 
E. Scott. F. W. Talbot. C. Hawks. 

Sail Francisco — I . E. Tillman, manacrer: 
C. F. Harris. P. Weinstein. E. T. Roberts. 

Seattle — L. X. Walton, manager: I.. V. 
Lamb. W. K. Beckwith. 

St. Louis — C. D. Hill, manager; J. Mor- 
phet. E. Dunas. J. Bradford. 



St. Louis Board Has 
Non-Compliance Case 

(Continued from page 1 ) 

fore the grievance board tomorrow on 
a charge of non-compliance. He will 
be asked to explain why his film sup- 
ply should not be cut off. 

He was ordered recently to discon- 
tinue giveaways. 

Harry G. Swan. Washington Thea- 
tre, the original complainant, made 
the non-compliance charge. 



Hays in Hollywood 

Hollywood, July 8. — Will H. Hays, 
a stopover at Sullivan. Ind., behind 
him, is due here today from the east. 



Monday, July 9, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



"Little Man" 
Hits $8,250, 
Minneapolis 



Minneapolis, July 8. — "Little Man, 
W hat Now?" ran up a fine $8,250 last 
week at the Minnesota. This- is over 
par by $750. 

"Little Miss Marker" also was a 
big draw. Playing day and date at 
the Century here and the Paramount 
in St. Paul, it took $4,500 at the 
former and $6,500 at the latter. 

"The Thin Man" ran over average 
$1,000 for a total of $6,500 at the 
State and was held over. 

Minneapolis' six theatres, usually 
making a $26,000 total got $28,200, 
while St. Paul's four generally gross- 
ing $14,000 took $16,350. 

Estimated takings : 

Minneapolis : 
Week Ending July 5: 

"LITTLE MISS MARKER" (Para.) 

CENTURY — (1,650), 25c-40c, 7 days. Gross: 
$4,500. (Average, $4,000) 

"UPPER WORLD" (Warners) 



day: 



Gross : 



(Univ.) 

days. 



LYRIC— (1,238), 20c-25c. 
$1,200. (Average, $1,500) 
"LITTLE MAN, WHAT NOW? 

MINNESOTA— (4.000). 25c-50c, 
Gross: $8.. '50. (Average. $7,500.) 

Week Ending June 29: 

"COCKEYED CAVALIERS" (Radio) 

RKO OR PHEUM— (2,900). 25c-50c. 7 days 
Gross: $5,700. (Average. $5,500.) 

"THE THIN MAN" (M-G-M) 



day 



Gross: 



days 



Gross: 



STATE— (2,300). 25c-40c 
$6,500. (Average. $5,500) 

"SWEDEN, LAND OF VIKINGS 
(Foreign) 
WORLD -(400). 25c-75c. 
$2,000. (Average. $2,000) 

St. Paul: 
Week Ending June 29: 

"LITTLE MISS MARKER" (Para.) 

PARAMOUNT— (2,300), 25c-40c. 7 days. 
Gross: $6,500. (Average. $5,500) 

"MANY HAPPY RETURNS" (Para.) 
RIVIERA— (1.200). 25c-40c, 7 days. Gross: 
$3,500. (Average. $3,500) 
"THE LIFE OF VERGIE WINTERS" 
(Radio) 

RKO OR PHEUM— (2,600). 20c-40c. 4 davs. 
Gross: $2,000. (Average for week. $4,000) 
"COCKEYED CAVALIERS" (Radio) 
RKO ORPHEUM— (2,600). 20c-40c, 3 days. 
Gross: $2,750. (Average (or week. $4,000.) 
"ALL MEN ARE ENEMIES" (Fox) 
TOWER— (1.000). 15c-25c, 4 days. Gross: 
$1,000. (Average, $800) 

"CALL IT LUCK" (Fox) 
TOWER — (1.000), 15c-25c. 3 days. Gross: 
$600. (Average. $700) 



Holiday, Heat Hit 
All Buffalo Spots 

Buffalo, July 8. — The holiday saw 
a general exodus from Buffalo, with 
most of those remaining taking part 
in parades and community celebra- 
tions. That fact, coupled with the 
heat, spelled below normal business in 
every theatre. "Sisters Under the 
Skin" and "Cross Streets" in the 
Lafayette did best at $6,400, only $100 
below average. 

Total take was $30,300. Normal is 
$34,800. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 6: 

"BABY TAKES A BOW" (Fox) 

BUFFALO— (3,500). 30c-55c, 7 days. Stage: 
Mills, Gold & Raye; Kay, Katya & Kay; 
Gilbert Diaz; Gautier's Animated Toy Shop. 
Gross: $12,300. (Average, $14,300) 

"HOLLYWOOD PARTY" (M-G-M) 
"THE WITCHING HOUR" (Para.) 
"THE MAD AGE" (Hollywood) 
CENTURY— (3.000), 25c, 7 days. Gross: 
$5,600. (Average $6,000) 

"FOG OVER 'FRISCO" (F. N.) 
HIPPODROME — (2,100) . 25c-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $6,000. (Average. $8,000) 
"SISTERS UNDER THE SKIN" (Col.) 

"CROSS STREETS" (First Division) 
LAFAYETTE— (3.300). 25c, 7 days. Gross: 
$6,400. (Average, $6,500) 



Pretty Bad 

John Chapman knows a fel- 
low who knows of a picture 
so bad that even its trailer is 
dull. 



"Winters" Is 
Big Holdover 
Draw in Hub 



Boston, July 8. — Fair business 
marked the holiday week, with "The 
Life of Vergie Winters" attracting 
general attention in its second week. 
The $18,000 gross was $2,000 over 
par. 

"Hollywood Party" did well at 
Loew-'s State with an $18,000 gross, 
also up by $2,000. "Here Comes the 
Groom" took $31,000 at the Metro- 
politan and "Let's Try Again" grabbed 
$18,000 at the Boston. 

Total first run business was $102,- 
000. Average is $92,000. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 5 : 

"MURDER ON THE BLACKBOARD" 
(Radio) 

"LETS TRY AGAIN" (Radio) 

BOSTON— (2.900). 25c-50c, 7 days. Gross: 
$18,000. (Average, $16,000) 

"FOG OVER FRISCO" (F. N.) 
"SPRINGTIME FOR HENRY" (Fox) 

FENWAY— (1.800). 30c-50c, 7 davs. Gross: 
$8,000. (Average, $9,000) 

"LIFE OF VERGIE WINTERS" (Radio) 

KEITH'S— (3,500). 30c-50c, 7 davs. 2nd 
week. Gross: $18,000. (Average, $16,000) 
"HOLLYWOOD PARTY" (M-G-M) 
LOEWS STATE— (3,700), 35c-50c, 7 days. 
Gross: $18,000. (Average. $16,000) 
"HERE COMES THE GROOM" (Para.) 
METROPOLITAN — (4.350). 30c-65c, 7 
days. Gross: $31,000. (Average. $28,000) 
"FOG OVER FRISCO" (F. N.) 
"SPRINGTIME FOR HENRY" (Fox) 
PARAMOUNT— (1,800), 30c -50c, 7 days 
Gross: $9,000. (Average, $9,000) 



Marker" Goes Big 
In Omaha, $8,250 



Omaha, July 8. — "Little Miss 
Marker," with "Affairs of a Gentle- 
man" the other half of a dual bill at 
the Orpheum, flirted with a record, 
$8,250. 

It was the best holiday week in 
years, despite the heat. 

Total first run business was $23,500. 
Average is $23,300. 

Estimated takings : 

Week Ending July 3: 

"DR. MONICA" (Warners) 

PARAMOUNT— (2.900), 25c-35c-40e. 6 
days. Gross: $7,000. (Average. $7,250) 
"MURDER ON THE BLACKBOARD" 
(Radio) 
"BLACK MOON" (Col.) 
BRANDEIS— (1,500), 20c-25c-35c. 5 clays. 
Gross: $3,000. (Average, $3,800) 

Week Ending July 5: 

"LITTLE MISS MARKER" (Para.) 
"AFFAIRS OF A GENTLEMAN" (Univ.) 

ORPHEUM— (3.000), 25c-35c-40c. 7 days. 
Gross: $8,250. (Average. $7,000) 
"SHE LEARNED ABOUT SAILORS" 
(Fox) 

WORLD — (2.200). 25c-35c. 7 days. Stage: 
Smith Varieties. Gross: $5,250. (Average. 
$5,250) 



Reopen "Hitler" Picture 

Buffalo, July 8. — Pulled out of the 
Hollywood after one day. due to pro- 
tests of the German consul and Ger- 
man societies. "Hitler's Reign of Ter- 
ror" has reopened in the Palace, lower 
Main street house which has discarded 
burlesque for the summer. 



"Take a Bow," 
Stage Revue 
Phila. Draw 



Philadelphia, July 8. — Hot weather 
and the Catholic ban were too much 
for Philly last week. 

The Fox, aided by a Shirley Tem- 
ple picture, "Baby Take a Bow," 
and a local radio revue built by 
WCAU, got the only business break, 
taking in $14,500 on the week. This 
tops par by $2,500. The Boyd and 
Victoria, downtown S-W houses, close 
Saturday. 

Total first run business was $53,700. 
Average is $65,300. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 5 : 

"LITTLE MISS MARKER" (Para.) 

ARCADIA— (600). 25c-40c-50c, 7 days. 2nd 
run. Gross: $1,800. (Average. 6 days, 
$2,400) 

"LIFE OF VIRGIE WINTERS" (Radio) 

BOYD— (2.400), 40c-55c-65c. 8 days. Gross: 
$10,000. (Average. 6 davs. $12,000) 

"THE CIRCUS CLOWN" Warners) 
EARLE— (2.000). 40c-55c-65c, 6 days. Stage: 
"Words and Music." revue headed by Les- 
ter Cole. Gross: $11,500. (Average. $12,000) 
"BABY TAKE A BOW" (Fox) 
FOX— (3,000), 30c-40c-60c. 6 days. Stage: 
WCAU's "Made in Phillv" radio revue. 
Gross: $14,500. (Average. $12,000) 
"THE GREAT FLIRTATION" (Para.) 
KARLTON— (1.000). 30c-40c-50c, 6 days 
Gross: $2,200. (Average. $3,500.) 

"HOLLYWOOD PARTY" (M-G-M) 
STANLEY— (3.700). 40c-55c-65c. 6 days. 
Gross: $8,000. (Average. $12,000.) 

"HE WAS HER MAN" (Warners) 
STANTON— (1.700). 30c-40c-55c. 6 days. 
Gross: $5,700. (Average, $7,000) 




"Sinner" and Fight 
Film Top Portland 

Portland, July 8. — Just a trifle bet- 
ter than average week, due in part to 
continued waterfront strike, increased 
attendance at dog races and return of 
warmer weather. Two sets of Baer- 
Carnera fight pictures did considerable 
in helping regular features to hold up. 
"Half a Sinner" at Hamrick's Music 
Box, plus the fight film, brought in 
$4,000, or $1,000 over normal. 

"Registered Nurse" at the Broad- 
way, with the fight films, secured but 
$400 over normal of $5,000. 

Total first run grosses were $22,600. 
Average is $22,000. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing June 27 : 

"REGISTERED NURSE" (F. N.) 
BAER-CARNERA PICTURES 

BROADWAY— (1,912), 25c-35c-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $5,400. (Average, $5,000) 

"HALF A SINNER" (Univ.) 
BAER-CARNERA PICTURES 

HAMRICK'S MUSIC BOX— (2,000). 25c- 
35c-40c, 7 days. Gross: $4,000. (Average. 
$3,000) 

"GLAMOUR" (Univ.) 

HAMRICK'S ORIENTAL— (2,040), 25c, 7 
days. Stage: Gilmour's Radio Circus. Gross: 
$2,500. (Average, $2,000) 

"CURTAIN AT EIGHT" 

PANTAGES— (1.700). 15c-25c, 7 davs 
Stage show. Gross: $1,700. (Average, $2,000) 
"NOW I'LL TELL" (Fox) 

"SPRINGTIME FOR HENRY" (Fox) 

PARAMOUNT— (3,008). 25c-35c-40c, 7 
days. Gross: $4,000. (Average, $5,000) 

"LOOKING FOR TROUBLE" (U. A.) 

UNITED ARTISTS— (945). 25c-35c-40c. 7 
days. Gross: $5,000. (Average, $5,000) 



Charter Three Concerns 

Albany, July 8. — Three film com- 
panies have just been chartered here. 
The names of the companies are 
Clinton-Appolo Theatre Corp ; Granar 
Theatre Corp ; Mid-Man Theatre 
Corp. 



INSTALL 
RCA VICTOR 
PHOTOPHONE 

OFFERING YOU: 

• A Sound Box Office 
Attraction 

• Complete Ownership 

• A Self-Liquidating 
Investment 



PHOTOPHONE DIVISION 

RCA VICTOR COMPANY, Inc. 

Camden, N. J. 

A Radio Corporation of America Subsidiary 




i 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Monday. July 9. 1934 



Chicago Gets 
Catholic O.K. 
For 52 Films 



(.Continued from page 1) 

Catholic people. The same courtesy 
will be extended other groups which 
may wish for such a list. 

"It is hoped that a bureau of infor- 
mation will be set up in the office of 
the New World which will have a 
complete file index of all pictures as 
they are released. It will be the pur- 
pose of this bureau to give definite 
information to all who may ask for 
information about pictures." 

List of Approved Ones 

Following are the pictures listed as 
approved for Catholic patronage : 

"Operator 13," "The Last Gentlemen," 
"The Witching Hour," "Orders Is Orders,^ 
"His Greatest Gamble," "I Give My Love, ; 
"A Man's Game," "The Loudspeaker, 
"Honor of the Range," "Baby Takes a 
Bow," "Murder in the Private Car, ' lhe 
Poor Rich," "David Harum," "One Is 
Guilty," "Straightway," "Mad Age,^ 
"Keep 'Em Rolling," "Voice m the Nighty 
"Man Trailer," "House of Rothschild, 
"Wheels of Destiny," "Bulldog Drummond 
Strikes Back," "Most Precious Thing m 
Life," "Fighting Ranger," "You re Telling 
Me " "Circus Clown," "No Greater Glory, 
"In Love with Life," "Wild Cargo, 
"Melody in Spring," "Bottoms Up, bor- 
rell and Son," "Harold Teen The 
Quitter," "City Limits,' "Thirty-Day 
Princess," "Mystery of Mr. X, Change 
of Heart," "Hell Bent for Love, A Very 
Honorable Guy," "Ever in My Heart 
"The Show-Off," "The Lost Patrol, 111 
Tell the World," "Six of a Kind Secret 
of Blue Room," "The Hell Cat," "Condemned 
to Death," "The Man from Utah, Stolen 
Sweets," "World in Revolt," The Fero- 
cious Pal." 

Those "Offensive in Spots" 

The following are described as 
"offensive in spots because they are 
suggestive, vulgar, sophisticated or 
lacking in modesty" : 

"Twenty Million Sweethearts, Stand 
Up and Cheer," "Where Sinners Meet, 
"Double Door," "Here Comes the Groom, 
"Crime of Helen Stanley," You Made Me 
Love You," "Shoot the Works,' Three 
on a Honeymoon," "Sing and Like It, 
"This Man Is Mine," "Thin Man, Let s 
Trv Again," "Constant Nymph, it Hap- 
pened One Night," "All Men Are Ene- 
mies," "Tarzan and His Mate." 'Whirl- 
pool," "Many Happy Returns <<TJ Mer ry 
Frinks," "Cockeyed Cavaliers, Party s 
Over " "Private Scandal," "Crosby Case. 
"We're Not Dressing," "Murder on the 
Blackboard," "Crime Doctor," -BeggaM 
in Ermine," "Viva Villa." "Now I 11 Tell, 
"Heart Song," "Half a Sinner Little 
Miss Marker," "Stingaree," "Song You 
Gave Me," "Ninth Guest," Looking for 
Trouble," "I've Got Your Number," "Come 
On, Marines," "As the Earth Turns," "Cat 
and the Fiddle." 

The following are labeled indecent 
and held entirely unfit for Catholic 
patronage : 

"Life of Vergie Winters." "Enlighten 
Thy Daughter," "Affairs of a Gentleman," 
"Side Streets," "Tomorrow's Children," 
"Dr. Monica," "Unknown Blonde," "Ari- 
ane," "Narcotic," "Road to Ruin." "Laugh- 
ing Boy," "Little Man, What Now?" 
"Madame Du Barry," "Born to Be Bad, ' 
"Uncertain Lady," "Girls for Sale," "Man- 
hattan Melodrama," "Wharf Angel." "Merry 
Wives of Reno," "Notorious but Nice," 
"Modern Hero," "Trumpet Blows." Finish- 
ing School." "Sisters Under the Skin," 
"Springtime for Henry," "Jimmy the 
Gent," "He Was Her Man," "Sadie Mc- 
Kee," "Fog Over Frisco," "Playthings of 
Desire," "It Ain't No Sin." 



Holy Name Joins in 
Chicago Film Moves 

Chk ago, July 8. — Pledge cards 
have been distributed in all Catholic 
churches to the 100,000 members of 



Laffoon Pays Tax 

Frankfort, Ky., July 8.— Gov. 
Ruby Laffoon's pet sales tax 
measure cost him three cents 
the Fourth of July when he 
entered a local theatre with 
two members of his family. 
They had passes, but the 
management ruled passhold- 
ers were liable for payment 
of the tax. He was stopped 
by the doorman. He returned 
to the cashier's window and 
deposited three cents. 



the Holy Name Societies pledging 
them not to attend offensive films. 

Cardinal Mundelein is sponsoring 
the local campaign. Active in the 
work with him are the Most Rev. 
B. J. Sheil, senior auxiliary bishop, 
and Rev. F. G. Dineen, SJ., pastor of 
St. Ignatius Church. 

It was announced that upon opening 
of the fall school term the campaign 
will be carried on into parochial 
schools. 



Catholic Editor Is 
Against Censorship 

Declaring that the drive of the 
Catholic Church against indecent pic- 
tures is not for censorship purposes. 
Rev. Wilfrid Parsons, S.J., editor of 
America, a Catholic weekly, states. 

"Quite the contrary. The responsi- 
bility does not belong to the state, 
and we are throwing it back where 
it belongs, on the producers. 

"My general opinion is that those 
fellows know their business. They 
have a wonderful way of giving en- 
tertainment. 

"The one thing that burns me up is 
their habit of throwing salacious bits 
into perfectly good movies, like Her- 
vey Allen did in his book, 'Anthony 
Adverse.' That doesn't help. 

"There's no shortage of good pic- 
tures if people would only discrimi- 
nate." 

Representatives from 25 Protestant 
denominations will meet next Friday 
and distribute pledges asking members 
to shun salacious films. The move is 
being backed by the Federal Council 
of Churches of Christ in America. 

Prior to sailing for Europe. Rev. 
Michael J. Curley. Archbishop of Bal- 
timore, and Rev. Dr. S. Parkes Cad- 
man joined in condemning indecent 
films. The former stated the move- 
ment is growing in momentum in 
Baltimore while Dr. Cadman said he 
rejoiced in cooperating with religious 
elements against indecent films. 



Reports Catholic Move 
Spreading to England 

London. Julv 8. — The Lesion of 
Decency crusade against objectionable 
pictures has reached across the Atlan- 
tic and into England, according to G. 
A. Atkinson, editor of The Era, well- 
known British amusement weekly. 

"The crusade has spread to Britain, 
where Councils of Action are being 
formed by Catholics in all centres." he 
writes. "Down in South Wales, where 
there are 90,000 Catholics, the move- 
ment has been joined by the Noncon- 
formists, who, at a Cardiff meeting, 
passed a resolution expressing 'com- 
plete agreement with the high moral 
and religious ideals of the Catholic 
Board'." 



Church's Ban Hays Reports 



Hits All Film 
In St. Louis 



(Continued from pane 1) 

Albany, N. Y. ; Augusta, Ga. ; Balti- 
more ; Brooklyn ; Buffalo ; Chicago ; 
Detroit ; Pittsburgh ; Portland. Me. ; 
Quincy, 111.; Rochester, N. Y., and 
Tulsa. 

Publishing approved and disap- 
proved lists are Omaha and San 
Antonio. 

Publishing the "white" list only are 
Cleveland ; Davenport, la. ; and Du- 
buque, la. 

Publishing the names of producers, 
but not titles of pictures are Boston, 
Fall River and Springfield, Mass. 



K. C. Jewish Editor 
Against Film Curbs 

(Continued from page 1) 
rusal. Having found it impossible 
to tell the nation what it could drink, 
the clergy is now getting busy on the 
project of advising us on what we 
can see. They will probably meet 
with the same ultimate success that 
they did on the drink evil." 



Sell Swedish Patents 

Washington, July 8. — Swedish 
rights covering the Petersen & Poul- 
sen sound film patents have been sold 
to the Swedish Nordisk Tone Film 
Co., according to a report received by 
the U. S. Department of Commerce 
from Assistant Trade Commissioner 
Paul H. Peterson at Copenhagen. 

The purchaser is to be capitalized 
at 2.000,000 crowns and is planning to 
build a new studio which, it is said, 
will be the largest in Scandinavia at 
Lidingoen. outside of Stockholm. 



Houston Spot to Be Store 

Houston, July 8.— The Queen, first 
picture house opened in Houston, will 
give way to progress Aug. 1 when the 
building will be remodeled for a de- 
partment store. Opened in 1915 by 
E. H. Hulsey of Dallas, the Queen 
was the first theatre here to play a 
picture program exclusively. Later it 
was controlled by S. A. Lynch of 
Southern Enterprises, and Publix. 



Takes Over Trendle House 

Detroit, July 8. — Lew Wisper, 
owner and operator of the Piccadilly, 
and heavily interested in the Calvin 
and Mack Uptown, has acquired the 
Easttown, a deluxe neighborhood 
house seating 2,500. from Trendle. 

The Easttown is a former Publix 
house reverted to Trendle when he 
assumed control of the Publix prop- 
erties in the city. 



Para. Signs Neilan 

Hollywood, July 8. — Marshall Nei- 
lan has been signed to direct the 
Damon Runyon yarn, "The Lemon 
Drop Kid" for Paramount. The film 
will top snot either Lee Tracy or 
Jack Oakie. Neilan at present is 
working on the screen play of "Mis- 
sissippi" in collaboration with Herbert 
Fields. 



Studios Ban 
Many Scripts 



(Continued from page 1) 

as offensive dialogue and questionable 
action, running at about 3,000 annually. 

Five hundred and sixty-four scripts, 
books and synopses intended for fea- 
tures and 293 intended for shorts 
were read by the Hays office during 
1933. 

Conferences on screen material be- 
fore production were as follows : Fea- 
tures, 629 ; shorts, 490. Pictures re- 
viewed during the year amounted to 
380 features and 168 shorts. Written 
opinions were sent to studios in 1,073 
cases involving features and 478 cases 
involving shorts. 



Censor's Work Hit 
By Milwaukee Clubs 

Milwaukee, July 8. — Failure of 
the city censor board to prevent the 
showing of "crude, unwholesome and 
morally objectionable" films has been 
charged by a committee of club women 
before the Common Council finance 
committee here. At the same time, the 
Holy Name Society is inaugurating a 
campaign to "root out all immoral and 
objectionable movies." 

In Madison, ministers other than the 
Catholic clergy, have commended 
Catholics for their Legion of Decency. 



Add to Seattle Censors 

Seattle, July 8.- — An amendment to 
the city charter which increases the 
board of censors from five to nine lias 
been passed by the council. Attached 
to the amendment was. a paragraph 
which gave the board the right to see 
f.ll theatrical advertising before pub- 
lication in newspapers if it so de- 
sires. The latter part was vetoed by 
Mayor John F. Dore. A further hear- 
ing on this phase is scheduled for a 
later date. 

Wants Censors on Sets 

St. Louis, July 8. — Stationing of 
a censor on every set during the mal< 
ing of films to guarantee against any- 
thing objectionable is advocated bv 
Rev. Theodore Graebner of Concordia 
Seminary, Clayton. Mo. He says he 
proposes to extend his Civic Union 
campaign against objectionable films 
to other cities. 



Insiders? Outlook 



(Continued from page 2) 

of it has to do with the code as 
seen through I.T.O.A. eyes. 
Trying a case for him is some- 
thing this publication refuses to 
go for. There are courts of law. 
regularly constituted, for that 
purpose. Apparently Weisman 
knows that, as witness his inten- 
tion of filing. When he does, his 
intentions will emerge from fu- 
tures into facts. That will make 
them news. Then they'll be 
reported in the columns of 
Motion Picture Daily. . 

KANN 



Monday. July 9, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



7 



MOTION PICTURE DAILY* 
HOLLYWOOD PREVIEW 



"Notorious Sophie Lang" 

( Paramount) 

Hollywood, July 8. — A fast-moving crook farce presenting Gertrude 
Michael in her first big role in the title part. Aiding are Paul Cavanagh, 
Arthur Byron, Alison Skipworth, Leon Errol and several others con- 
tributing to a well-balanced cast which interprets a series of clever 
situations sufficient to hold the interest. 

Although the crook element is not vindicated, the average audience 
probably will not criticize on this score because of the farcical intent to 
interest for clean-cut entertainment. The story centers around a battle 
of wits between two clever crooks, namely Miss Michael and Cavanagh, 
and the New York police department with plenty of subtle and outright 
comedy intermingled to keep the proceedings from becoming too serious. 

It moves fast with surprises in every sequence. The big city back- 
ground and upper social stratum allow artistic background, good 
photography and production values. 

Able screen treatment of Anthony Veiller, plus expert direction of 
Ralph Murphy and competent assistance of the entire cast contribute 
toward the whole. 

Designed solely for laughs with no intentions of going serious, this 
seems headed to please various types of audiences. Running time, 
72 minutes. 



Short 
Subjects 



"Burn 'Em Up Barnes" 

(Mascot) 

If the first two episodes can serve 
as a criterion of what follows, this 
serial is to be highly recommended 
for both kids and adults. It contains 
all the stock thrill material, but done 
in an authentic and convincing manner 
against an automobile race track back- 
ground. 

The story concerns Jack Mulhall, 
king of dirt track drivers, and his 
efforts to educate Frankie Darro, 
younger brother of his pal, who had 
been killed taking newsreel shots of 
Mulhall's first race. Lola Lane, a 
garage owner and holder of the town 
school bus franchise, supplies the love 
interest when Mulhall quits the track 
after his pal's death and becomes her 
partner. Edwin Maxwell and Jason 
Robards are trying to buy some land 
from Miss Lane because, unknown to 
her, it is rich with oil. Reel two ends 
with Mulhall chasing two of Max- 
well's henchmen who have evidence 
that would clear him from a trumped 
up charge of murder. Running time, 
15 mins. per episode. 



"Speaking of Relations" 

(Roach-M-G-M) 

Hollywood, July 8. — Irvin S. 
Cobb's first film hardly rises to the 
occasion on the comedy graph chart. 
It is slow and below par on comic situ- 
ations and laughs. 

Cobb is a retired river steam boat 
captain, who has a tough time slip- 
ping away from Kathryn Clare Ward, 
his unmarried sister, for a fishing trip 
with his crony, Frank Darien. Benny 
Baker, a practical joking nephew, 
shows up to make himself a nuisance 
and succeeds. While fishing, Benny 
frames Cobb with the game warden, 
which costs Cobb his bank roll. Try- 
ing to get even, the sister is pushed 
into the pond by mistake for a wind- 
up. Hal Yates directed. Running 
time, 18 mins. 



"Young Eagles" 

( Romance Product) 

This serial is a humdinger for kids 
and will surely go over with family 
audiences. Its main theme is the ad- 
ventures of a brace of Boy Scouts 
who win a flying trip to South 
America. The plane is wrecked in the 
jungle and a series of hair-raising es- 
capes from the clutches of wild beasts 
ensue. 

There's plenty of action in this chap- 
ter play and the youngsters will want 
to come back for more each week. 
It's clean and supports the tradition 
of the scout. Bobby Ford and Jim 
I Adams, newcomers, are the adven- 
turers. The first chapter runs 28 min- 
utes, but the following series run about 
20 minutes each. 



Borg Quits Post 

Kansas City, July 8. — Russell C. 
Borg has resigned as manager of Con- 
solidated Film Distributors, indepen- 
dent exchange. J. Erwin Dodson, for- 
merly National Screen Service repre- 
sentative, has been added to the Con- 
solidated sales staff. 



"ShootWorks" 
Denver Smash 
With $7,000 

Denver, July 8. — "Shoot the 
Works" overcame the competition of 
night baseball, amusement parks and 
the Elitch Stock Co. last week. The 
take at the Denham was $7,000, up by 
$3,000, and the feature was held over 
for nine days. 

"Operator 13" had a fair $5,500 at 
the Orpheum. 

Total first run business was $21,750. 
Average is $20,500. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 5 : 

"WHERE SINNERS MEET" (Radio) 

ALADDIN — (1.500), 2Sc-35c-50c, 7 days. 
Gross: $2,250. (Average, $2,500) 

"SHOOT THE WORKS" (Para.) 
DENHAM— (1,500). 25c-40c, 7 days. Gross: 
$7,000. (Average. $4,000) 

"STINGAREE" (Radio) 
DENVER— (2.500), 25c-35c-50c, 7 days. 
Gross: $5,000. (Average. $6,000) 

"OPERATOR 13" (M-G-M) 
ORPHEUM— (2.600). 25c-35c-50c, 7 days. 
Gross: $5,500. (Average. $6,000) 

"WHIRLPOOL" (Col.) 
"SISTERS UNDER THE SKIN" (Col.) 
PARAMOUNT— (2.000). 25c-40c. 7 days. 
Gross: $2,000. (Average. $2,000) 



Royalties Are Taxable 

Albany, July 8. — Income taxes on 
copyright royalties must be paid to 
the state by authors and playwrights, 
according to the Appellate Court, 
which so ruled on a test case of Elmer 
Rice. 

The court held unanimously that 
such taxes may be retroactively on 
copyright royalties. 



Bomb Minneapolis House 

Minneapolis, July 8. — The Cozy 
Theatre, north side neighborhood 
house, has been bombed. A woman in 
the next building was hurled from 
bed and glass showered nearby struc- 
tures. 



"Winters" Is 



Cleveland Hit 



Despite Ban 



Cleveland, July 8. — "Vergie Win- 
ters" played to the biggest week's 
business, $14,000, the RKO Palace has 
known since it adopted a straight pic- 
ture policy, in spite of excessive heat 
and the fact that it is on the black list 
of the Catholic Legion of Decency and 
was held up for a time by the Ohio 
censors. 

It is the first picture to be held over 
by the Palace. 

Business was dull elsewhere. Total 
first run business was $33,600. Aver- 
age is $34,000. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 6 : 

"LITTLE MAN, WHAT NOW?" (Univ.) 

ALLEN— (3.300). 20c-30c-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $3,500. (Average, $3,000) 
"MERRY WIVES OF RENO" (Warners) 

WARNERS' HIPPODROME — (3.800), 30c- 
35c-44c, 7 days. Gross: $3,500. (Average, 
$5,000) 

"SISTERS UNDER THE SKIN" (Col.) 
"NOTORIOUS BUT NICE" (Chesterfield) 

WARNERS' LAKE — (800). 30c -40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $1,500. (Average. $2,000) 
"LIFE OF VERGIE WINTERS" (Radiol 

RKO PALACE— (3,100). 30c-35c-44c, 7 
days. Gross: $14,000. (Average. $10,000) 

"MANY HAPPY RETURNS" (Para.) 

LOEWS STATE— (3,400). 30c-35c-44c, 7 
days. Gross: $8,500. (Average. $10,000) 
"THIRTY DAY PRINCESS" (Para.) 
"LAUGHING AT LIFE" (Mascot) 

LOEWS STILLM AN— (1,900). 20c-30c-40c. 
7 days. Gross: $3,000. (Average, $4,000) 



"Thin Man" Does $39,800 

"The Thin Man" at the Capitol 
garnered $39,800 in its first week and 
will probably do around $30,000 in its 
second closing Thursday night. 



Miller's Father III 

Chicago, July 8. — Jack Miller has 
left for the east to visit his 80-year- 
old father who is in declining health 
at his home in Westville, N. Y. 



Variety Club 
Chatter 



Buffalo 

Buffalo, July 8. — Ted O'Shea, 
M-G-M manager, is quite the golfer 
among loca<l club memberjs. After 
carding a neat 89 for a 65 net score 
to win first prize in the Cal Wadley; 
sweepstakes at Transit Valley, She 
came back next day to win the first 
leg on the Vincent R. McFaul Cup 
for low match score in the Variety 
Club tournament at Willowdale. 

Joseph Schuchert, Jr., won the 
first leg on the A. Charles Hayman 
Cup for low gross score in the tourna- 
ment. Hercules N. Webster, chair- 
man of the committee for the day's 
outing, won the driving contest. Her- 
bert T. Silverberg won the tennis 
trophy. 

More than 100 participated in golf, 
tennis and quoits and more than 125 
guests attended the dinner in the 
evening. Trophies were presented by 
Ganson Depew, president of the Buf- 
falo Chamber of Commerce and of the 
Western New York District Golf 
Ass'n. 



Cincinnati 

Cincinnati, July 8. — A buffet 
luncheon in and on the local club were 
served to members Monday evening, 
the purpose being a general get-to- 
gether as well as to discuss plans for 
the picnic which the tent expects to 
hold this month. Several places are 
under consideration, but a definite de- 
cision as to location has not yet been 
reached. 

Harry Sachs, member of Tent No. 
6, was among those present around 
the local club last week. 

Barker Ervin Bock, manager of the 
closed RKO Capitol, has been trans- 
ferred to the RKO Paramount as as- 
sistant to Joe Goetz for the present. 
This is Bock's former stamping 
ground. 



Washington 

Washington, July 8. — The weekly 
luncheons will be discontinued during 
August. 

"Kings for the Day" at the last 
luncheon were J. William Cleveland 
and Nat Stiefel, who presented 
Tenor James Melton, then appearing 
on the Earle Theatre program, for the 
vocal interludes. 

While the activities of the tent for 
August are undecided, it is expected 
that picnics or other divertissements 
will be substituted. Canvasman A. 
Julian Brylawski issued the invi- 
tation to the tent to foregather at his 
cottage on the Wicomico River in 
Maryland on Aug. 20. 



New Warner Team 

Hollywood, July 8. — Warners will 
pair Frank McHugh with Joe E. 
Brown in "Six Day Bike Rider." The 
picture is slated to get under way 
in the next ten days with Lloyd Bacon 
directing. 



C. E. A. Talks Reel 

London, July 8.— The C. E. A. (ex- 
hibitors' association) should enter the 
newsreel field on its own, according to 
opinions expressed by several provin- 
cial members. 





THE PRESS! 
THE RADIO! 
THE PUBLIC! 
THE PULPIT! 

LEADERS IN ALL WALKS OF LIFE 
ACCLAIM THIS MIGHTY EPIC! 



WALTER WINCHEL on na- 
tional coast -to -coast radio 
hook-up said: "'ARE WE 
CIVILIZED' MAKES THE 
MOST STIRRING PLEA 
FOR PEACE, HEARD AND 
SEEN, YET." 



"If I were President of these 
United States I would en- 
deavor to have a law passed 
compelling every man, wo- 
man and child to see 'ARE 
WE CIVILIZED.'" 

-Ed Wynn 



"I congratulate you and re- 
gard 'ARE WE CIVILIZED' 
as one of the most outstand- 
ing pictures I have ever seen." 
—J. F. T. O'Connor, Control- 
ler U. S. Currency. 



"VOICE OF EXPERIENCE" 
over national radio hook-up 
said: "I watched my old friend 
William Farnum enact the 
greatest characterization of 
his entire career ... I hope 
you will see this picture for 
yourselves." 



"I saw, and I hope many of 
you will see, the movie en- 
titled 'ARE WE CIVILIZED' 
—excerpt from sermon in St. 
Bartholomew's Church, New 
York by Rev. Geo. Paul T. 
Sargent, D. D. 



"May I recommend 'ARE 
WE CIVILIZED' to every 
father, mother, yes, to every 
teacher and to every pupil of 
our vast school system."— 
Maxwell Ross, Chairman, 
Allied Local School Boards, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



"Has great mass appeal . . . 
fine direction . . . the film is 
going to be eaten up in the 
small towns."— Chick Lewis, 
Showmen's Round Table. 



"Timely appeal to reason . . . 
it is skillfully made, power- 
fully acted by William Far- 
num and it features some 
stunning, spectacular scenes 
— New York Mirror 



RASPIN PRODUCTIONS, inc., rko building, new york, n. y. 



The Leading 
Daily 

piewspal|e% 
of the 
Motions! 
Picture 
Industry 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Alert, 

Intelligent 

and 

Faith fut 
Service to 
the Industry 
in All 
Branches 



OL. 36. NO. 7 



NEW YORK, TUESDAY, JULY 10, 1934 



TEN CENTS 



V 



Para. Awaits 
Moves Under 
Changed Law 



Trustees' Appointments 
Up to Court Today 

Additional steps which are expected 
to carry Paramount further along the 
road to reorganization are anticipated 
as a follow of the naming today of 
l>ermanent trustees for the company 
under the new bankruptcy law. 

The hearing is slated for this morn- 
ing before Federal Judge Alfred C. 
Coxe and may result in retirement 
from the Paramount trusteeship of 
Charles E. Richardson, who has been 
serving with Eugene W. Leake and 
Charles D. Hilles. Under the bank- 
ruptcy laws as now constituted, the 

(Continued on page 6) 

"U" Sets 10 Films 
In the Music Hall 

Universal yesterday signed its first 
big product contract with the same 
theatre which took its product in New- 
York last year, the Music Hall. The 
deal was arranged between James R. 
Grainger and F. J. A. McCarthy for 
Universal, and W. G. Van Schmus 
for the Music Hall. It provides that 
in the next 52 playing weeks. New 
York's "ace" picture house will show 

(Continued on page 7) 

Walsh's Para. Deal 
On Percentage Basis 

George Walsh, by a new deal just 
' concluded, becomes a Paramount 
operating associate with a percentage 
of the net and a guaranteed salary 
with approximately 14 upstate the- 
atres under his wing. Long with the 
| Comerford circuit, headquartering in 
Scranton, Walsh has been running the 
string in which he now acquires a 
profit interest for many months. 

He will buy his own film, arrange 
his own bookings and run the show 
out of Poughkeepsie under the decen- 
tralization formula applied to this 
string of houses which are located in 
Newburgh, Poughkeepsie, Peekskill, 
Micfldletown, Syracuse and Glens Falls. 

/. /. Franklin Set 
For Hawaii Circuit 

San Francisco, July 9. — J. J. 
Franklin, operating as Franklin The- 
atrical Enterprises of Los Angeles, 
plans to build a chain of theatres in 

t (Continued on pane 8) 



Churches Here | 
To Talk With I 
Film Leaders 



Decide on Move Before 
Starting Campaign 

Conferences with producers are to 
be sought by the three main divisions 
of New York churches — Catholic, 
Protestant and Jewish — before starting 
a clean film drive here similar to those 
now in progress throughout the coun- 
try. This was decided yesterday at a 
luncheon conference at Holy Cross 
rectory. 

Present at the luncheon w : ere : Mgr. 
Michael J. Lavelle, vicar-general of 
the Archdiocesse of New York, and 
Rev. Joseph A. McCaffrey, rector of 

(Continued on page 4 ) 



Hays Sees a Gain 
In Film Criticism 

Hollywood, July 9. — That "the 
American public and the picture in- 
dustry have everything to gain from 
every sincere movement which works 
for the proper selection of picture 
entertainment" was the assertion made 
by Will H. Hays upon his arrival 
here today. 

"Current criticism," said the M.P. 
P.D.A. head, "has the very signifi- 
cant value of encouraging the support 

(Continued on page 4) 



Critique 

Hollywood, July 9. — Asked 
for comment on how he en- 
joyed his trip to Honolulu, 
Harry Brand said: 

"I give it two and one-half 
stars for pleasure and four 
stars for expense." 



Phila. Groups 
To Confer on 
Closing Plan 



Philadelphia, July 9. — The two 
rival independent theatremen's groups 
here, the M.P.T.O. and the Independ- 
ent Exhibitors' Protective Ass'n, to- 
day appointed committees to confer 
with each other and with Warners on 
the proposal to close local houses until 
the church's film boycott is modified. 

After the installation of Charles 
Segall as its new president the M.P. 
T.O. launched into a discussion of the 

(Continued on page 4J 

Breen Not an NRA 
Man — Rosenblatt 

Washington, July 9. — Hollywood 
stories indicating that Joseph I. 
Breen's job as official censor for films 
produced by Hays association mem- 
(Continued on page 4) 



Loew's Seeks 
Third of Shea 
Circuit Stock 



Shea Estate, Paramount 
Expected to Split 

Loew's, Inc., is negotiating and ex- 
pects to close shortly for a one-third 
interest in the operating circuit devel- 
oped by the late Michael Shea in Buf- 
falo, Niagara Falls and North Tona- 
wanda. 

Now owned jointly by the Shea es- 
tate and Paramount Publix, it is un- 
derstood both groups will relinquish 
sufficient stock to aggregate the one- 
third which the Loew circuit is about 
to annex. 

_ Operation, it is expected, will con- 
tinue as heretofore in the hands of 
Vincent R. McFaul, general manager 
of the circuit, which recently switched 

(Continued on page 6) 



Report Skouras as 
Operator for Loew 

Reports were current yesterday that 
with the anticipated court approval 
of the foreclosure sale of Fox Metro- 
politan Playhouses to Loew's and 
Warners a matter of routine now, 
George P. Skouras will operate the 
Long Island houses for Loew's when 
they are taken over. 

ft already has been brought out 
in court that Louis Frisch and Sam 
Rinzler have been offered posts by 

(Continued on page 6) 

Says Columbia Not 
To Hamper Theatres 

Chicago, July 9. — Columbia is defi- 
nitely reconciled to the idea the ex- 
hibitor must be allowed to run his 
own business, said Jack Cohn today 
at the opening of the company's west- 
ern sales meeting at the Medinah Club. 

'While we do not believe in 10-cent 
admissions, still if that is what the 
(Continued on page 8) 

Report Code Boards 
Are Delaying Sales 

Tardiness of local boards in getting 
through new clearance and zoning 
schedules is reported holding up new 
season deals. 

As a result a joint meeting of the 
clearance and zoning and grievance 
committees, consisting of George J. 
Schaefer, R. H. Cochrane, Charles L. 
O'Reilly, and Harold S. Bareford will 

(Continued on page 6) 



For Code Approved Films 

Hollywood, July 9. — On and after July 15, when the strengthened 
self-regulation formula of Hays member companies swings into 
effect, the following certificate will be issued to producers whose 
pictures meet and pass code requirements under Joseph I Breen: 

Certificate No 

THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT....; 

(name of Producer) 

in the production of 

(title of picture) 

has complied with the self-imposed regulations of the industry 
as administered by the Production Code Administration of 
the Motion Picture Producers & Distributors of America, Inc., 
to maintain right standards in the production of motion pic- 
tures as a form of entertainment. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I, JOSEPH I. BREEN, Director 
of the Production Code Administration of the Motion Picture 
Producers & Distributors of America, Inc., have hereunto set 
my hand and caused the seal of the Production Code Admin- 
istration to be hereunto affixed this days of 193... 

(SEAL) Director, Production Code Administration. 

Code-approved pictures will be entitled to carry this on prints 
with the seal of the M.P.P.D.A. super-imposed: 

This picture approved by the Production Code Administra- 
tion of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of 
America, Inc. 

Certificate No 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Tuesday, July 10, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 

(Registered U. S. Patent Office) 



Vol. 36 



July 10, 1934 



No. 7 




Martin Quigley 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 
MAURICE KANN jjo 

Editor 
JAMES A. CRON 
Advertising Manager 



Published daily except Sunday and holi- 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub- 
sidiary of Quigley Publications, Inc., 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 1790 Broadway, New 
York. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Cable ad- 
dress "Quigpubco, New York." All con- 
tents copyrighted 1934 by Motion Picture 
Daily, Inc. Address all correspondence to 
the New York Office. Other Quigley pub- 
lications: MOTION PICTURE HERALD, 
BETTER THEATRES, THE MOTION 
PICTURE ALMANAC and THE CHI- 
CAGOAN. 

Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Lite 
Building, Vine and Yucca Streets, Victor 
M. Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 407 
South Dearborn Street, Edwin S. Clif- 
ford, manager; London Bureau: Remo 
House, 310 Regent St., London, W. 1, 
Bruce Allan, Representative. Cable address: 
"Quigpubco, London"; Berlin Bureau: 
Berlin - Tempelhof, Kaiserin - Augustastrasse 
28, Joachim K. Rutenberg, Representative; 
Paris Bureau: 19, Rue de la Cour des- 
Noues, Pierre Autre, Representative; Rome 
Bureau: Viale Gorizia, Vittorio Malpassuti, 
Representative; Sydney Bureau: 102 Sus- 
sex Street, Cliff Holt, Representative; Mex- 
ico City Bureau: Apartado 269, James 
Lockhart, Representative; Glasgow Bureau: 
86 Dundrennan Road, G. Holmes, Repre- 
sentative; Budapest Bureau: 11 Olasz 
Fasor 17, Endre Hevesi, Representative. 

Entered as second class matter January 
4, 1926 at the Post Office at New York 
City, N. Y., under Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada $15 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 

Mascot Distribution 
Lineup Is Completed 

Mascot Pictures Corp. has set com- 
plete distribution for 10 features and 
two specials for 1934-35 release, Nat 
Levine announced yesterday. 

Twenty-three exchanges located in 
key cities will handle the pictures. 
They are: 

Excellent, Detroit; Far West, Exchanges, 
Los Angeles and San Francisco; Gold Med- 
al. Philadelphia and Washington; Holly- 
wood, Boston; B. N. Judell, Inc., Chicago, 
St. Louis and Indianapolis; Independent, 
Dallas; Heme State, Little Rock, Ark.; A. 
C. Bormberg Attractions, Atlana; Majesic, 
Milwaukee; Majestic, New York; Majestic, 
Seattle and Portland; Midwest, Kansas 
City and Omaha; Monarch. Pittsburgh; 
Standard, Buffalo and Albany; J. S. Jos- 
sey, Cleveland and Cincinnati; Monogram, 
Oklahoma City; Distinctive, Denver and 
Salt Lake City, and Celebrated, Minneap- 
olis. 



Knight Captures Award 

R. E. ("Fuzzy") Knight, manager 
of the Fairmont, Fairmont, West Va., 
is winner of the June Quigley Award, 
the sixth in the series. His campaign 
on "20 Million Sweethearts" took top 
honors. Twelve honorable mentions 
have also been decided upon by judges 
of the Managers' Round Table Club 
of the Motion Picture Herald. 



Farrow Made Director 

Hollywood, July 9. — John Farrow, 
formerly a writer, has been made a 
full-fledged director at M-G-M. His 
first effort will be a two-reel musical, 
"Beauty and Truth," which Harry 
Rapf is producing. 



Insiders' Outlook 



MR. Nicholas M. Schenck : 
M-G-M Corp., 
New York City. 
Dear Mr. Schenck: 

Your studio previewed "Born to 
Be Kissed" in Hollywood over 
the week-end. What Motion 
Picture Daily's coast repre- 
sentative thought of it, you will 
find elsewhere in this edition this 
morning. Probably you know a 
good deal about the story and the 
picture anyway. . . . 
■ In it, as the wires conveyed the 
story, Jean Harlow decides to play 
with wealth and fire, but her ob- 
ject is only matrimony. Lewis 
Stone loses fortune, standing and 
his life at his own hands. Next in 
line is Lionel Barrymore, but 
Franchot Tone, as Barrymore's 
son, beats his pater to the punch. 
Barrymore doesn't like the match, 
frames Miss Harlow with an 
unknown man, but Jean gets back 
at him in the semi-nude. It's all 
done with photographs and we 
aren't punning. ... It is the 
opinion of this publication's re- 
viewer that the picture "has its 
moments but its selling demands 
thoughtful, tactful exploitation at 
this time." 

It is our opinion it would be 
worth your own time to call for a 
print of "Born to Be Kissed" 
when it arrives from the studio, 
then weigh what elements the 
picture contains against the 
church campaign raging from 
coast to coast for a personal de- 
termination of a course to be pur- 
sued in this particular instance 
and at this particularly crucial 
time. . . . 

▼ T 

A question : Having dished out 
red meat, plenty peppery for 
some time now, what will Holly- 
wood do under production code 
administration as reinforced to 
meet the church clamor ? An 
answer and a fear combined in 
one : It stands in danger ( 1 ) of 



swinging its pendulum com- 
pletely the other way, (2) of 
turning out namby-pamby prod- 
uct lacking in spine and in 
strength. Confidential dope from 
Hollywood indicates studios are 
sidetracking any and all proper- 
ties that seem loaded. The mis- 
taken idea that everything has to 
be sunshine is just as fallacious 
as the theory that everything has 
to be muddied. There is a mid- 
dle ground somewhere in the pic- 
ture. This is what Hollywood 
and its production brains are now 
called upon to find. . . . 

T 

Little doubt in anyone's mind 
now about the future control of 
Fox Met. The Loew-Warner bid 
and all of the obstacles thrown 
in its path are virtually over- 
come. Which means that the deal 
will go through momentarily. 
New twist is expectation George 
Skouras will get Long Island 
under the new ownership and 
Frisch and Rinzler, otherwise 
known as Randforce, will stay 
where they are in Brooklyn. Just 
how the neighborhood first run 
situation will change is difficult to 
forecast at this time. A realign- 
ment seems inevitable. . . . 

T 

Unconfirmed, but around the 
town with a limited circulation : 
That Loew's, aside from an occa- 
sional, but never really serious 
tilt with RKO on circuit opera- 
tion a la New York style, is defi- 
nitely peeved this time over the 
latter's expansion. Not because 
RKO has seen fit to step out, but 
because annexed houses are re- 
garded as competitive with Loew 
theatres. The rebuttal will take 
the obvious form of gobbling up 
houses competitive with RKO. . . . 
Sidney Kent was reported the 
head man in a big downtown 
meeting vesterday. . . . 

KANN 



Issues on Big Board Slump 



High Low Close 

Columbia Pictures 28% 2854 2854 

Consolidated Film Industries, pfd 14 14 14 

Eastman Kodak 9854 9754 9754 

Fox Film "A" 135i 12% 13 

Loew's, Inc 28 2654 26% 

Loew's, Inc., pfd 90% 90% 90% 

M-G-M, pfd 2554 25 25 

Paramount Publix, cts 354 354 

Pathe Exchange 2J4 2% 2% 

Pathe Exchange "A" 21 20^ 205^ 

RKO 254 254 254 

Warner Bros 5% 4% 5 

Warner Bros., pfd 20 20 20 

Technicolor Off % on Curb 



Net 
Change 

— m 



-154 

-m 

- % 

—1 

- % 

- Vs 
-154 



-354 



Technicolor 



High 

• 1354 



Low 

1254 



Net 

Close Change 

1254 -54 



Sales 

200 
300 
300 
500 

2,500 
100 
200 

1,500 
200 
100 
100 
900 
100 



Sales 

100 



Warner Bonds Drop Point 



General Theatre Equipment 6s '40. 

Keith B. F. 6s '46 

Loew's 6s '41, ww deb rights 

Paramount F. L. 6s '47 

Paramount Publix 554s '50 

Warner Bros. 6s '39, wd 









Net 




High 


Low 


Close 


Change 


Sales 


m 


m 


754 


+ % 


3 


68'/ 


6854 


6854 


— % 


32 


10054 


100'/ 


10054 


5 


49 


49 


49 




5 


49 


483$ 


4854 




32 


55 


54% 


55 


—1 


29 



< Purely 
Personal ► 

MARIA GAMBARELLI is mak- 
ing a tour of mid-western cities 
following her engagement at Grau- 
man's Chinese. Her next opening date 
is the RKO Palace, Chicago. 

Richard Barthelmess and Mrs. 
Barthelmess expect to return to 
Hollywood next instead of taking 
their planned European cruise. 

Joe Lee says now that he has got- 
ten over his throat operation success- 
fully he's geared for high fidelity 
sound. 

Winifred Law, stage player, has 
been signed by Educational to do a 
comedy with Tom Patricola and 
Buster West at the Eastern Service 
Studio. 

Patsy Kelly flies to New York at 
the end of the week. This will be 
her first vacation from Hollywood in 
a year. 

Sam Hammer of the Capitol pub- 
licity staff is going to Lock Sheldrake 
for his vacation. 

Charles L. Clifford has sold his 
original story, "Soldier Woman," to 
Paramount. 

Percy Phillipson is now sojourn- 
ing in the countryside adjacent to Port 
Chester. 

Herman Zohbel and Herbert J. 
Yates combined for lunch at the Tav- 
ern yesterday. 

Hal Horne apparently did not va- 
cation far afield. He was back on the 
job yesterday. 

Charles Moses is now a benedict. 
A surprise is in store for him to- 
morrow night. 

Louis Nizer looked swell in the 
cream colored suit yesterday. 

Neil Agnew and Charles Reagan 
are due from the coast today. 

Irving Lesser is vacationing via an 
auto tour. 

Isabel Jewel, M-G-M player, ar- 
rives from Hollywood today. 

Roger Ferri has gone to the coast. 



"Nell Gwyn" to Be 
Previewed Tonight 

"Nell Gwyn," produced by British 
and Dominions and to be released 
here by United Artists, will be pre- 
viewed at the Astor Theatre at 9 
P. M. tonight. Herbert Wilcox, who 
directed, is acting as host. Anna 
Neagle, last seen in this country in 
"Bitter Sweet," plays the title role 
with Cedric Hardwicke as Charles II. 

The showing has assumed the pro- 
portions of the event of the week in 
the New York trade, the following 
having been furnished their tickets 
with assurances many of them pro- 
posed attending : Sidney R. Kent. 
David and Arthur Loew, James R. 
Grainger, Nicholas M. Schenck, Harry 
M. Goetz, Robert F. Sisk, Lee A. 
Ochs and Harry Brandt. 

J. E. M. Carbell, acting British 
consul general, will attend. 



Researchers Delay Meet 

A meeting scheduled for yesterday 
at the M. P. Research Council to 
elect a successor to Mrs. August Bel- 
mont, who recently resigned as presi- 
dent, has been postponed indefinitely. 



f (/DG£ For Yourself 




AUMONT BRITISH is definitely committed 
to the policy that exhibitors should be 
accorded the privilege of seeing all pro- 
Juct before buying. We are selling pictures, 
jof promises. 

Another policy of outstanding importance to 
sxhibitors is based on our firm conviction that 
>ictures of the highest entertainment quality can 
>e produced without resort to suggestive action 
>r dialogue; that wit and humor, tense drama 
ind convincing realism can be achieved with- 
out sacrifice of decency. 

Ve are now prepared to screen any, or all of 
'ur "SELECT TWELVE" group, for exhibitors 
/ho are desirous of presenting clean pictures 
/ith one hundred per cent audience and box- 
•ffice appeal. 





MU I ION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Tuesday. July 10, 1934 



Churches Here 
To Talk With 
Film Leaders 



(Continued from page 1) 

Holy Cross Church; Rev. Dr. Walter 
M. Howlett, representing the Greater 
New York Federation of Churches; 
Rev. Dr. Sidney E. Goldstein, repre- 
senting the New York Board of Jew- 
ish Ministers and the Central Confer- 
ence of American Rabbis ; Rev. Dr. 
Rosenbloom, and former U. S. District 
Attorney Arthur W. Tuttle, acting as 
legal representative of the church 
federation. 

Asserting that under Will Hays' 
leadership the industry had fallen low, 
Father McCaffrey demanded the resig- 
nation of the M. P. P. D. A. presi- 
dent. 

Aims of the Legion of Decency were 
discussed. Those present agreed upon 
the necessity of a film cleanup, but it 
was decided that before details of a 
campaign are worked out it would be 
well to confer with all the principal 
producers and get their attitude toward 
the movement. It is expected that this 
meeting, if held, will take place within 
the next few days, as the conferees 
expect to hold another session next 
week. 

To Appeal to Investors 

'What we intend to do is talk 
directly to the men who have their 
money invested in the picture busi- 
ness," said Father McCaffrey yester- 
day. "These are the men who can say 
yes or no." 

At the Hays office last night no 
comment was forthcoming pending re- 
ceipt of direct word of the proposed 
request. Hays is on the coast. 

Whether the committee's invitation 
will be sent through the Hays office 
or directly to individual producers was 
not stated. 

In the meantime plans are going 
ahead for a conference of national 
leaders of Protestantism called by Dr. 
Worth M. Toppey of the Federal 
Council of Churches of Christ in 
America. This conference will be held 
Friday. 

The purpose of this gathering is to 
discuss a form of pledge to be given 
to church members and details of plans 
to bring the campaign into contact with 
the various social service organiza- 
tions of the Protestant churches, 
women's organizations, young people's 
groups and the Y.M.C.A. and the 
Y.W.C.A. 



Kansas Bishop Extends 
Decency Legion Scope 

Concordia, Kan., July 9. — All "im 
moral" amusements and reading mat- 
ter are included in the Legion of De 
cency call issued by Bishop Francis 
J. Tief of the Concordia Catholic 
diocese, which embraces the large 
northwest Kansas area. 

Bishop Tief directed the parish 
priests to remind their people of "their 
solemn duty not only to protest 
against this diabolical destroyer of 
Christian virtue (meaning films), but 
also to abstain from all immoral and 
dangerous amusements." 

The bishop asked the priests to ob- 
tain the cooperation of the parish or- 
ganizations and student sodalities in 



Page the Dionnes 

Chicago, July 9. — Jerome 
Safron, west coast division 
manager for Columbia, was 
notified at the convention 
here today that he had just 
become the father of twin 
girls, one weighing five 
pounds and other five pounds, 
six ounces. 

He is holding up well. 



the movement and urged that repre- 
sentative lay committees be formed 
"and ready at all times to cooperate 
with their pastors." 

The pledge of the Legion of De- 
cency, declared the bishop, "is posi- 
tive evidence of our indignation and 
a solemn promise to abstain not 
merely from all evil motion pictures, 
but from immoral books, magazines 
and plays as well. The patron of these 
pernicious agencies has a heavy re- 
sponsibility. His money makes their 
continuance possible. Only motion 
pictures and amusements recommended 
by Catholic organizations should be 
frequented." 

Priests in the diocese were asked 
to report the number of pledges signed, 
the results of the campaign and the 
reactions of the local exhibitors. 



Kansas City Won't Send 
Church Leaders Here 

Kansas City, July 9. — Local 
Protestant churches will not be repre- 
sented at the conference in New York 
Friday called by the Federal Council 
of Churches to organize for a "clean 
film" campaign. Rev. Irvin E. Deer, 
general secretary of the Kansas City 
Council of Churches, said the organi- 
zation had no funds to send delegates, 
but the proposals made at the New- 
York meeting would be carefully con- 
sidered bv the local organizations. 



Sees Remedy in Lauding 
The Good, Banning Bad 

Declaring the screen "is definitely 
not as degenerate as our drama, our 
art and our letters, but its demorali- 
zation is more dangerous to the public 
morals because the screen is more in- 
timately associated with the home life 
of our people," an editorial, attributed 
to William Randolph Hearst and pub- 
lished in his newspapers through the 
country, declares reformation will 
come by approving good pictures and 
condemning the bad. The comment 
maintains "it is unwise for the 
churches to condemn all pictures." 



Stewart, Episcopal bishop; the Rev. 
George W. Dixon, vice-president of 
the Chicago Federation of Churches ; 
the Rev. Dr. Charles Meade, Method- 
ist bishop of Kansas City and Uldine 
Utley, girl evangelist. 

Last night pledge cards were dis- 
tributed at 410 Catholic churches in 
a move to enroll 1,250,000 locally in 
the campaign of the Legion of De- 
cency. 

Four hundred delegates from Cath- 
olic universities attending the conven- 
tion of the Sodality of Our Lady at 
the Palmer House here yesterday 
went on record to advance the church 
drive on unclean films and passed a 
resolution calling attention to indecent 
publications and urging Catholics to 
band together to suppress them and 
support the Catholic literary revival. 



Church Leaders Hail 
Hearst Film Editorial 

Chicago, July 9. — Church leaders 
today were extensively quoted in the 
Herald and Examiner in commenda- 
tion of William Randolph Hearst's 
editorial declaring for clean films 
which appeared in the Hearst press 
yesterday. 

Cardinal Mundelein commented as 
follows : "I am indeed pleased to see 
Mr. Hearst's editorial on the fight be- 
ing waged for clean pictures. Chi- 
cago is fortunate in having a press 
solidly backing the churches' cam- 
paign to make pictures a wholesome 
source of entertainment and educa- 
tion." 

Others who were quoted in a simi- 
lar vein were the Rev. Timothy Row- 
an, editor of The New World, Catho- 
lic organ ; the Rev. Dr. George Craig 



Breen Not an NRA 
Man — Rosenblatt 

(Continued from page 1) 

bers has some omcial connection with 
the National Recovery Administra- 
tion elicited a statement today that 
ne has no connection with the govern- 
ment in any capacity. 

In an official statement, Division 
Administrator Sol A. Rosenblatt re- 
ferred to a Hollywood dispatch of 
July 7, which, he said, "implied that 
the NRA was involved in a proposed 
plan of censorship of motion picture 
films." 

Any such statement, he declared, is 
"absolutely incorrect." 

"The Hollywood dispatch stated 
that Joseph 1. Breen made an an- 
nouncement of self regulation and 
censorship of motion pictures by the 
nlm industry 'after his appointment 
as NRA code administrator'," Ro- 
senblatt continued. "Mr. Breen has 
no connection whatever with the 
X RA. Any reference in this, or 
other dispatches, to a 'producers 
code' is not to the code of fair com- 
petition for the motion picture indus- 
try, but rather to the code of ethics 
formulated by and for members of the 
M.P.P.D.A., which has no connection 
with the NRA." 



Hays Sees a Gain 
In Film Criticism 

(Continued from page 1) 

of good pictures. Product to be re- 
leased this fall will abundantly de- 
serve this discriminating support. Its 
great scope and variety will include 
major and minor classics of literature, 
musicals, historical romances, rare 
fantasy, human interest stories deal- 
ing with every-day life and pictures 
that will reflect the great social 
trends of the dav." 



Will Rogers to Tour 

Hollywood. July 9. — Following 
completion of "Judge Priest," Will 
Rogers will take his two sons, Will. 
Jr.. and Jimmy, for a tw r o months' 
tour of Europe, leaving here July 28 
by way of Honolulu. Mrs. Rogers 
will go as far as China and return 
Alary Rogers will continue her work 
in stock in the east. 



Phila. Groups 
To Confer on 
Closing Plan 



(Continued from page 1) 
boycott. Exhibitors were divided on 
the question of shutting down, with 
the majority in favor of arriving at 
a conciliation with the church forces. 

M. E. Comerford expressed the 
opinion that the matter would right 
itself soon and definitely opposed the 
idea of closing. Harry Schwable said 
exhibitors could get a whole lot 
further cooperating with the churches 
rather than combating them. He as- 
serted any closings should be in direct 
cooperation with the church, instead 
of being carried out as measures an- 
tagonistic to the ecclesiastics. 

Segall declared exhibitors "victims 
of circumstances, convicted without a 
hearing." 

"We are innocent," he asserted, "but 
we must bear the burden of the boy- 
cott. The churches have not con- 
demned pictures in this territory but! 
have condemned us." 

Committee Is Named 

Segall called for a show of hands • 
on the closing sentiment, but was in- 
terrupted by further discussion from 
the floor, which led to the formation 
of a committee to confer with the ' 
Independent Exhibitors' Protective 
Ass'n. Lewen Pizor was made chair- > 
man. Others on the committee are 
Luke Green, Abe Sablosky, Michael ' 
Egnal and Michael Lessy. 

The meeting appointed also a com- 
mittee to confer with operators and 
set meeting days for the M.P.T.O. and 
its board of managers. 

At the Independent Exhibitors' Pro- 
tective Ass'n meeting Morris Wax, | 
president, asserted he told Cardinal 
Dougherty and Mgr. Lamb that the 1 
independents were sympathetic to the 
attempt to raise the moral tone of the 
screen but also told them the inde- 
pendents were not responsible for im- 
moral films because of the block book- 
ing system. He reported the hope hadlj 
been expressed by Mgr. Lamb than) 
the church ban would not last long, j 

Named to the committee which isj j 
to confer with the M.P.T.O. andi 
Warners were C. Stamper, Dave Bar- 
rist, Wax, George Gravenstein, A 
Fisher, Harry Fried, Herbert Elliot 
Clarence Hecksher and William But 
ler. Also appointed was a committee 
to investigate all non-theatrical book- 
ings and to protest to the director ol 
public safety on the unfair competition !| 
offered by taprooms. 

The meeting protested against 
RKO-Radio on the basis of a rumoi 
that the company planned to offei 
two 50 per cent films on its new', 
product list. 



Reports $209,225 Loss 

Boston, July 9.— Keith Memorial 
Theatre Corp., controlled by RKO 
through Greater N. Y. Vaudeville 
Theatres Corp., reports a loss of $209, 
225 for 1933, after deducting expenses 
and other charges. 



I 



Fox Westwood Dark 

Hollywood, July 9. — The Fo| 
Westwood studio is dark. No pic- 
tures are in work or slated for at 
least 10 days. The first to snap th( 
studio out of its brief lethargy wil's 
be "Marie Gallante," top-spotting 
Spencer Tracy and Kitty Gilliarf 
Henry King will direct. 

The Wurtzel unit on Western Ave 
continues active with two features ax 
one Spanish production before thj 
cameras. 



MAJESTIC PRODUCING CORPORATION PRESENTS 



V.** 



C QL.UE 

MOO? 



N 



Iking Picture of 
The Great American Classic — By Nathaniel Hawthorne 





4*. 



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If E T TERi 



With 



HARDIE ALBRIGHT v.V^fi^ ITZl 

ALAN HALE — CORA SUE COLLINS — WM. KENT 



-ected by Robert Vignola 
oervised by Larry D armour 




THRILLED 
TO ITS 
ABSORBING- 
DRAMA/ 



' I ""HE grandeur, the sublimity, the heart-rending 
pathos, the romance and beauty of this immortal 
story make it the author's masterpiece. . . . During 
three generations readers throughout the world 
thrilled to the terrible ordeal of sweet and gentle 
Hester Prynne . . . bravely wearing the shameful 
stigma over an aching heart . . . rather than reveal 
the name of the man she loved. . . . He — forced to 
agonizing silence . . . finding relief by searing his 
guilty breast with a livid, scarlet letter "A 1 '. 





A 



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of 



the 



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6 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Tuesday, July 10, 1934 



Para. Awaits 
Moves Under 
Changed Law 



(Continued from page 1) 
impression is prevalent in Paramount 
circles that two trustees, rather than 
the present three, will be sufficient to 
handle the company's affairs. 

Richardson, former Chase National 
executive and subsequently treasurer 
of Fox, has stated he has been de- 
sirous of returning to private affairs 
which were interrupted when he joined 
Paramount by court appointment 
many months ago. Leake, Hilles and 
Richardson have been serving as tem- 
porary trustees pending today's hear- 
ing. 

All developments at Paramount 
under former bankruptcy statutes have 
been held in abeyance pending appoint- 
ment of permanent trustees. That 
Leake and Hilles will be so named is 
regarded as a foregone conclusion. 

Foremost probably among deals so 
set back has been the Saenger reor- 
ganization which was slated for 
court approval a number of weeks 
ago, but delayed until, or after, this 
morning. Second is a permanent oper- 
ating agreement covering the Publix 
theatres in Detroit now being managed 
by George W. Trendle. His offer for 
a permanent deal has been submitted 
and presumably after today will again 
be placed on the calendar of business 
awaiting disposal. 

Other matters hanging include 
claims contested by Paramount trus- 
tees. In this group is a claim of the 
Indemnity Insurance Co. for $229,842 ; 
the Citizens' Trust and Savings Bank 
of Los Angeles for $58,749, and the 
First National Bank of Boston for 
$225,000. Up for a hearing on June 
22, these unsettled claims were post- 
poned until, or after, July 10. 



Last of Paramount 
Foreign Men Depart 

Last of the Paramount foreign con- 
tingent has left New York for their 
respective headquarters cities. John 
Cecil Graham, managing director in 
Great Britain, and Carl P. York, oc- 
cupying a similar post in Scandinavia, 
are aboard the Majestic, now four 
days out. John L. Day, managing di- 
rector for South America, is aboard 
the Pan-America three days out for 
Rio. 



London, July 9. — Phil Hyams of H. 
and G. Kinemas, Ltd., Earl St. John, 
Paramount theatre operator for Eng- 
land, and M. J. Messeri, managing 
director of the company's Spanish 
unit, are aboard the Berengaria due 
at Southampton Wednesday. 



Paramount, aside from original de- 
nials, has been 100 per cent silent on 
reports Phil Hyams came over on a 
deal to sell to it his London houses, 
all large and all de luxe. 



"Empress" for Criterion 

Paramount plans to open "The 
Scarlet Empress" at the Criterion at 
two-a-day within the next few w^eks. 
"Cleopatra" also is slated for a show- 
ing at the same spot. 



Operators' Scales 
Face Study by NR A 

Washington, July 9. — -Statistical 
studies of operators' and stagehands' 
pay scales in Greater New York will 
be started July 11 by Donald K. Wal- 
lace and Daniel Bertrand of the Divi- 
sion of Research and Planning of the 
National Recovery Administration, it 
was declared today by Division Ad- 
ministrator Sol A. Rosenblatt. 

The two men have been assigned 
to Rosenblatt to serve as a fact-find- 
ing agency, it was explained, and their 
reports will be made to the division 
administrator, who will base his con- 
clusions thereon. 

The investigation is the first step 
to bring about coordination of pay 
scales. The findings and administra- 
tor's recommendations are expected 
to be finally laid before a board to 
be appointed to set up wage scales. 

Shorts Forcing Up 
In Trio of Appeals 

Forcing of shorts highlighted the 
three appeals heard by Campi's com- 
mittee yesterday. On the committee 
were W. Ray Johnston, Cresson Smith 
and Laurence Bolognino. 

Appealing from a decision against 
it, Whalley Theatre Co. of New Hav- 
en, asked that it be relieved of 80 per 
cent of the shorts purchased from 
Paramount. Ed Levy, attorney for 
the exhibitor, contended that he bought 
one-fifth of his 312 pictures from 
Paramount and since he can only play 
150 shorts with a dual policy he should 
therefore be entitled to buy only one- 
fifth of the company's shorts. 

Paramount, through its attorney, 
Sidney Justin, claimed that the con- 
tract was signed in October and the 
code did not go into effect until Dec. 
7 and there was no basis for the 
claim. 

J. B. Fishman and a number of 
other independent New England ex- 
hibitors attended the hearing. 

The other cases were that of Harry 
L. Lavietes, Pequot, New Haven, 
against Lyric, State and Garden, 
same city, on clearance and zoning ; 
Middletown, Enterprises, Middletown, 
Conn., against Capitol, Hartford, 
clearance and zoning. A. J. Vanni of 
Poli withdrew his appeal from a de- 
cision of the New Haven board in a 
case involving Jadamus Amusement 
Co. 

Of the 100 appeals and 15 certifica- 
tions on the docket, 16 decisions and a 
like number of recommendations by ap- 
peal committees will be ready Thurs- 
day. More than half of the appeals 
filed have been heard. 

Three Cases Cleared 
By Board in Detroit 

Detroit, July 9. — Three cases have 
been disposed of by the grievance 
board. 

Complaint of Joseph Simon, Del- 
ray, against Thomas Lancaster, 
Grande, charging overbuying, was dis- 
missed. 

Harold Chereton, DeLuxe, Sagi- 
naw, Mich., was ordered to end re- 
bates. Stanley J. Marz, State, Sagi- 
naw, was the complainant. 

The case of I. J. Lomdon, Ferryfield 
Theatre, alleging improper advance 
advertising by Ben and Lou Cohen, 
Grand Victory, was dismissed, as the 
complainant failed to appear. 

The clearance and zoning board has 



advised Detroit exhibitors it will 
shortly submit a clearance and zon- 
ing plan that will not be subject to 
further protests except that an ap- 
peal may be made to Code Authority 
within five days of publication. 

It also notified Grand Rapids ex- 
hibitors that they were at liberty to 
submit schedules for the zoning plan 
for that city up to July 16. 



Report Code Boards 
Are Delaying Sales 

(Continued from page 1) 

be held today at Campi headquarters 
in an effort to push ahead the new 
schedules. 

Tomorrow the finance committee 
meets on a new plan to allocate the 
producer and distributor assessment 
for the first half year. 

Yesterday Austin Keough and J. 
Robert Rubin met on legal matters and 
the production committee comprising 
W. Ray Johnston, Bareford and Rubin 
also held a special conclave. 

Results of all sessions will be in the 
form of recommendations to be pre- 
sented Thursday. 



Portland Alternates 
On Boards Named 

Portland, July 9. — Named as alter- 
nates for the impartial members of the 
clearance and zoning board are : 

Jack Luihn, manager Sealey-Dresser 
Co., delicatessen and grocery concern. 
He is about 55, and well versed in 
code matters pertaining to the grocery 
trade. 

Walter R. May, manager of the 
Portland Chamber of Commerce. He 
was for some years a secretary for 
various organizations and was con- 
nected with the Portland Oregonian. 

Harvey Wells, member of the legis- 
lature for several terms, is in the gen- 
eral insurance business, and also an 
officer in the Jantzen Amusement Co. 



Seider Complains on 
Valencia Clearance 

Joseph Seider has filed a clearance 
and zoning complaint against Loew's 
Valencia, Jamaica, claiming that the 
protection on his Granada, Rialto and 
Patchogue in Patchogue. and Regent 
and Bayshore, Bayshore, L. I., by 
Loew's should be lifted. 

The case comes up before the New 
York board July 18. 

An appeal has been filed on the 
Port Jefferson zoning schedule as re- 
cently promulgated by the board. 

The Hastings, Hastings-on-the-Hud- 
son, has filed a clearance complaint 
against the Strand, Yonkers, asking 
eliminations of the protection. This 
case comes up July 16. 

Milwaukee Still at 
Work on Clearance 

Milwaukee, July 9. — Milwaukee 
County's proposed clearance and zon- 
ing schedule continues in the pruning 
process with another meeting of the 
local board slated for July 11. Ap- 
proximately a half dozen meetings 
have been held since the plan was 
aired at a general exhibitors' gather- 
ing here June 19. 

The grievance board continues to 
hold a clean calendar and with no 
complaints outstanding has aired no 
grievances on its regular Monday 
meeting date for the past four weeks. 



Loew's Seeks 
Third of Shea 
Circuit Stock 

(Continued from pane 1) 

its corporate entity from Shea Operat- 
ing Corp. to Buffalo Theatres, Inc. 
Mr. McFaul is a veteran in the or- 
ganization, having practically grown 
up with it. 

The Shea houses include the Bailey, 
1,790 seats; Buffalo, 3,489; Century, 
3,076; Court Street, 1,640; Elniwood, 
1,600; Great Lakes, 3,024; Hippo- 
drome, 2,089; Kensington, 1,366: 
North Park, 1,440; Seneca, 1,750 in 
Buffalo; Bellevue, 1,535 in Niagara 
Falls and Riviera, 1,249, in North 
Tonawanda. 



Report Skouras as 
Operator for Loew 

(Continued from page 1) 

Loew's, their territory to be confined 
to operating the group in Brooklyn. 

Most of the theatres now operated 
by Skouras are in Long Island. He 
has about 10 in New Jersey and about 
10 in New York, five in the latter 
group which do not come under the 
Fox Met. banner. 

Xo new developments between 
counsel for bondholders and the two 
circuits came to light yesterday. 

Skouras could not be reached for 
a statement, while at Loew's the 
Skouras angle was admittedly prob- 
able. 



Addison Is Promoted 

H. M. Addison, zone manager for 
Loew's with headquarters in Cleve- 
land, has been promoted and trans- 
ferred to Boston where he will exer- 
cise supervision over the circuit's 
houses in these cities : Providence. 
Montreal, Toronto, London, Ont. ; 
Syracuse and Rochester, as well as 
Boston. 

Second Appeal Up on 
U. A, Cancellations 

Second appeal on the U. A. 10 per 
cent cancellation issue has been filed 
with Campi, the Highland. Fort 
Thomas, Ky., and Park, Cincinnati, 
being the complaining exhibitors. 

In this instance the exhibitor want- 
ed to cancel "Catherine the Great" and 
U. A. refused to do so. The issue is 
on the calendar for July 31. 



Need No Endorsements 

With the sending out of the first 
batch of new code assent forms today 
to far western points, no endorsements 
of signing exhibitors will be necessary, 
it was pointed out bv Campi vester- 
day. 

Oppose "Race Nights'* 

Hollywood, July 9. — The Man- 
chester Theatre has filed a complaint 
with the grievance board against 
"race nights" at the Florence, Mecca 
and Castle. 



To Fill Berres' Post 

Successor to Al Berres, who re- 
cently resigned from the studio labor 
committee in Hollywood, will be 
named by Campi on Thursday. 



Tuesday, July 10, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



7 



MOTION PICTURE DAILY* 
HOLLYWOOD PREVIEW 

"Born to Be Kissed" 

{M-G-M) 

Hollywood, July 9. — Convincing Franchot Tone, wealthy scion of 
Sire Lionel Barrymore, that her energy is potential and not kinetic 
seems easy for Jean Harlow, an erotic maid, but more difficulty will be 
experienced convincing audiences in the John Emerson and Anita 
Loos screen play directed by Jack Conway. 

Tempestuous Jean, motivation lily white, decides to play with wealth 
and fire but her object — matrimony. Her first victim, Lewis Stone, 
goes broke, philosophically promises to marry her and then commits 
suicide. Next she tries owlish Lionel, but his son, Franc?hot, pursues 
Jean, is halted by her dictum and they both fall in love. 

Astute Lionel, dissenting, frames Jean photographically with an un- 
known man, but she returns the compliment by being snapped semi-nude 
with him. To save his own skin, Lionel sanctions the Franchot-Jean 
nuptials. 

Half-scarlet Harlow runs an emotional gamut. Tone troupes well 
and is virile, too. Patsy Kelly, Jean's pal, offers good comedy relief. 
The production, visualizing allurement dramatically of a presumably 
innocent golddigger, is smoothly knit. 

While the central character taxes one's credulity, the film is well 
paced and has its moments but its selling demands thoughtful, tactful 
exploitation at this time. Running time, 75 minutes. 



Looking 'Em Over 



"The Crime of Helen Stanley" 

(Columbia) 

Although "The Crime of Helen Stanley" is slavish in its adherence 
to the formula set down for mystery films, it is moderately entertaining. 

It is the customary drag-'em-in-and-drag-'em-out affair. Everyone in 
sight with even the remotest reason for wishing Helen, a movie star, 
out of the way is placed under suspicion and, as usually happens in 
films of the type, the most innocent appearing turns out to be the guilty 
party. This production manages to be a more or less pleasant guessing 
match and the identity of the killer is never for a moment given away. 

The film produces a variety of motives why the star's enemies might 
want her disposed of, and she had plenty of enemies, for she wasn't 
exactly a pleasant sort. The motive of the murderer was to avenge the 
death of his brother, a director, driven to suicide by the actress. The 
murder is committed on the set while a film is in production. The studio 
background lends interest to the picture. 

Ralph Bellamy is the police inspector in the case. Some of those 
at whom he flings his question marks are Shirley Grey, Bradley Page, 
Kane Richmond, Vincent Sherman, Clifford Jones, Arthur Rankin, Ford 
Bond and Lucien Prival. Gail Patrick plays the star. D. Ross Lederman 
directed. Running time, 58 minutes. 



Short 
Subjects 



"The Queen of Hearts" 

(Celebrity) 

With the nursery tale of '"the 
queen of hearts who made some tarts" 
as a story, this is an entertaining 
short. Done in Cinecolor and with 
musical dialogue, it opens with the 
king ordering the pastry and the 
queen repairing to the kitchen to make 
it. Soap powder gets into the dough 
by mistake, and when the knave steals 
the tarts he becomes sick. The windup 
is a battle in the kitchen between the 
knave and the king's forces, with 
everyone rushing to get back into a 
deck of cards as the clock strikes 12. 
Running time, 8 mins. 



"Beau Bashful" 

( Universal) 

An entertaining short featuring 
Herbert Corthell, Grady Sutton and 
Sylvia Picker. The story concerns 
the plight of two bashful sweethearts, 
Sutton and Miss Picker, who want to 
get married but lack the courage to 
take the necessary steps. They, are 
aided by Corthell, the father, in a 
roundabout way and all ends happily. 
Most of the laughs are packed in the 
last half after the young couple regis- 
ter at a hotel. Running time, 20 
mins. 



"Paris au Fil de L'eau" 

(J. C. Bernard) 

An interesting travelogue done with 
the impressionistic camera angles and 
fine photography which characterized 
the Fox Magic Carpet series. The 
scenes are made from the deck of a 
boat on the Seine. They show bridges, 
statues, fishermen, varied types of life, 
the back of huge churches and other 
Parisian structures. As shown on the 
lie de France the running narrative 
was in French, but it is understood 
that it will be dubbed into English 
for American distribution. Running 
time, 19 mins. 



"Le Sud" 

I i J . C. Bernard) 

Some of the camera work in this 

I is extraordinarily beautiful. Most of 
the scenes are laid in the Sahara 
south of Algiers, and the cameramen 
waited for light and shadow and cloud 
effects. The photography conveys a 

j vivid impression of the vastness of the 
desert, the beauty of its shifting sand 

! dunes, and the oddities of town life 

- on oases. Native music accompanies 
some of the latter scenes. Very much 

I worthwhile. Running time, 20 mins. 



Greenburg Goes Upstate 

Harold Greenberg, booker and buy- 
er for Publix upstate New York 
houses, has moved his headquarters 
from the home office to Poughkeep- 
sie. 



Jury to Get Union's Books 

The books of Local 306 were or- 
dered turned over to the Kings 
County Grand Jury for investigation 
yesterday by County Judge Martin in 
Brooklyn. The jury is looking into 
the affairs of the union. 



Technicians to Resume 

Hollywood, July 9. — The executive 
committee of the Technicians' branch 
of the Academy met today to pass 
upon plans for resumption of the 
technical program which was sus- 
pended some months ago. S. J. Twin- 
ing is chairman of the papers and 
programs committee in general charge 
of the branch meeting program. 



Mrs. DeMille Recovering 

Dover, N. J., July 9. — Mrs. Cecil 
DeMille is in the Dover General Hos- 
pital, it was learned here today, re- 
covering from an operation. She is 
reported to be on the road to recov- 
ery. 



Ida Lupino Recovers 

Hollywood, July 9. — Ida Lupino 
has completely recovered and is out 
of the infantile paralysis quarantine. 



Extend Hutchinson Pact 

Hollywood, July 9. — After viewing 
rushes on her first day's work in 
"Gentlemen Are Born," Warners tore 
up Josephine Hutchinson's contract 
and wrote a new one calling for three 
pictures on an exclusive one-year con- 
tract. 



Joe Cook Film Off 

Fox yesterday verified Coast reports 
that plans to star Joe Cook in "Fun 
in the Air" had been canceled. 

Late yesterday afternoon, S. R. 
Kent, in a statement, said the picture 
had been "indefinitely postponed." 

Mrs. Uno Gets Pickwick 

Greenwich, Conn., July 9. — Mrs. 
Mary Uno has acquired the Pick- 
wick from Haring & Blumenthal, 
making a total of three in her circuit. 
She also operates the Strand and 
Palace in Stamford. 



"U" Sets 10 Films 
In the Music Hall 

(Continued from page 1) 

10 pictures. The others will be shown 
in other Broadway first run houses. 

Last season, in addition to RKO 
the Music Hall showed Fox and Col- 
umbia as well as four from Univer- 
sal. This year's committment is a 
150 percent increase over last year. 

The company yesterday also set its 
anticipated bell-ringers for the next 
few months. In August, it will be 
"One More River" starring Diana 
Wynyard ; in September, "There's 
Always Tomorrow," featuring Binnie 
Barnes ; in October, "Night Life of the 
Gods" and "Imitation of Life," the 
latter starring Claudette Colbert ; in 
November, "The Good Fairy," star- 
ring Margaret Sullavan ; in December, 
"The Great Ziegfeld." 



"U" to Do "Crusoe" 

Hollywood, July 9. — Universal has 
added "Robinson Crusoe" to the 1934- 
35 program. Henry Hull has been 
slated for the top spot. 



Carr Continues III; 
Johnston Heads West 

Hollywood, July 9. — Complications 
in the condition of Trem Carr will 
confine him to the Cedars of Lebanon 
Hospital for another two weeks. 

Monogram, in the meantime, has 
moved from General Service to Pathe. 



W. Ray Johnston of Monogram 
had not heard of the setback in Trem 
Carr's condition yesterday. A wire 
from the patient Saturday said he had 
expected to leave the hospital today. 
Infection following an abdominal op- 
eration is delaying complete recovery. 

The Monogram president starts for 
the coast Thursday by auto on a com- 
bination vacation and business trip. 
He will keep an eye on production 
until Carr returns some weeks hence. 
Johnston will be away from New 
York for two months. 



Harry Frillman Dead 

Columbus, O., July 9. — Harry 
Frillman, 63, well known Ohia theatre 
executive, died at his home in Colum- 
bus following a heart attack. Until 
recently he had been affiliated with J. 
Real Neth and had been manager of 
the Cameo. For 18 years he was stage 
manager and bass singer with the 
Al G. Field Minstrels. Burial was in 
Columbus. 



Beecroft Death Shocks 

Old timers in the industry yester- 
day were shocked to learn of the death 
of James Beecroft from a gun-shot 
wound in a rowboat off Harbor Island 
Park, Mamaroneck Sunday afternoon. 
He is survived by his widow and two 
children. 

Beecroft was for some years New 
York advertising manager of Exhibi- 
tors' Herald, a forerunner of Motion 
Picture Herald. 



Mrs. Rembusch Passes 

Shelbyville, Ind., July 9. — Mrs. 
Grace Rembusch, wife of Frank J. 
Rembusch, died here Friday from 
either a heart attack or a cerebral 
hemorrhage while asleep. 



I 



8 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Tuesday. July 10, 1934 



Hollywood Personals 

Hollywood, July 9. — Cliff Lewis and Marjorie Decker marry 
Aug. 11. . . . Rufus King, author of "Conversation Piece," in town. 
. . . George Somnes on a tour of Europe. . . . Pat O'Brien wonder- 
ing what to do with the 400 books he bought at auction. . . . Grace 
Moore and her husband motoring in northern California. . . . 
Columbia very proud of its new bootblack, candy, and hot-dog 
stand. . . . Pert Kelton back to Catalina for more sunburn. . . . 
Charlie Rogers sent a gorgeous bunch of posies to Harry J. Brown 
as a greeting on Harry Joe's first as associate producer at War- 
ners. . . . Dick Powell catching up on his correspondence. . . . The 
Warren Williams on hand to see the yachts take off in the annual 
Honolulu race. . . . Even the electricians chimed in with the pro- 
duction staff in applauding that new dance Fred Astaire and 
Ginger Rogers do in "Gay Divorce." When the juicers unlax it 
must be good. . . . William Anthony McGuire threw a stag dinner 
the other night for Liam O'Flaherty, noted Irish scrivener. . . . 
Irene Dunne now has a Badminton court in her Beverly Hills 
back yard. . . . Bill Hanneman making daily tours of the lot, pop- 
ping off blackboards with a kid's slingshot — the quaint fellow. . . . 
Bruce Cabot and wifey, Adrienne Ames, going in for golf right in 
their own backyard. . . . 



"Thin Man" Pulls 
$5,500, Oklahoma 

Oklahoma City, July 9. — "The Thin 
Man" was in the money here last week 
in spite of the heat. It reached $5,500, 
over par by $500. 

The only other draw in town was 
"The Merry Frinks" with a stage 
show at the Liberty, where the take 
for four days was $2,000. 

Total first run business was $13,500. 
Average is $13,500. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 7: 

"THIN MAN" (M-G-M) 

CRITERION — (1,700), 10c-20c-36c-41c-56c, 
7 days. Gross: $5,500. (Average, $5,000) 
"SHOOTS THE WORKS" (Para.) 

MIDWEST— (1,500), 10c-26c-36c-56c, 7 
days. Gross: $3,000. (Average. $4,000) 

"COCKEYED CAVALIERS" (Radio) 

CAPITOL — (1,200), 10c-20c-26c-36c-41c, 7 
days. Gross: $2,200. (Average. $2,500) 

"ALL MEN ARE ENEMIES" (Fox) 

LIBERTY— (1,500), 10c-15c-26c-36c, 3 
days. Gross: $800. (Average week, $2,000) 
"MERRY FRINKS" (F. N.) 

LIBERTY— (1,500), 10c-15c-26c-36c, 4 days. 
Stage: "Rhythm Aristocrats." Gross: $2,000. 
(Average week, $2,000) 

/. /. Franklin Set 
For Hawaii Circuit 

(Continued from page 1) 

Hawaii, a territory now controlled by 
Consolidated Amusements in which 
Louis Greenfield, now deceased, was 
long a prime mover and an approxi- 
mate 50 per cent owner. 

Consolidated operates on an exclus- 
ive buy for the islands and not only 
runs product in its theatres but sells 
it to government reservations and 
sugar plantations as well. M-G-M 
is the one distributor which failed to 
get together with Consolidated last 
year. It will build in Honolulu 
through Loew's. 



J. J. Franklin is telling distribution 
headquarters here that his contem- 
plated circuit will give them more rev- 
enue out of Hawaii than they now 
have been getting from any other 
source. 

Harold B., J. J. Franklin's broth- 
er, when asked yesterday, stated he 
had no interest in the venture aside 
from supplying advice if and when 
requested. 

Says Columbia Not 
To Hamper Theatres 

(Continued from page 1) 

exhibitor must have, we are for the 
exhibitor," he declared. "The same 
applies to double features. Columbia 
will not attempt to restrict the ex- 
hibitor in the successful operation of 
his enterprise." 

From Nate Spingold came the good 
word Columbia had signed more con- 
tracts prior to the opening of the con- 
vention this year than it had four 
weeks after the close of the 1933 meet- 
ing. 



Academy Groups Busy 

Hollywood, July 9. — Five Academy 
meetings are set for this week start- 
ing tomorrow when the Research 
Council meets with the subcommittee 
chairmen. Wednesday night the 
sound recording subcommittee will 
meet ; film preservative subcommittee, 
Thursday noon, and silent camera sub- 
committee, Thursday evening. The 
uniform screen illumination subcom- 
mittee will see a series of tests at the 
Radio studio Friday night. 



Mexico's 17th Film 
Company Is Started 

By JAMES LOCKHART 

Mexico City, July 9. — Mexico's 
list of producers has been increased to 
17 with the establishment here of the 
Compania Impulsora Cinematograph- 
ica. American-Mexican capital is be- 
hind the project, and Paul Bush, lead- 
ing automobile distributor, is the head. 

Sound films will be made for the 
Mexican market. Rodriguez Brothers' 
sound system has been acquired and 
their studios have been taken over. 
Robert Quigley of Hollywood will be 
a combination director and scenarist. 

Trendle Complains 
On Shift of House 

Detroit, July 9. — George W. Tren- 
dle, head of United Detroit Theatres, 
says Lew Wisper has obtained con- 
trol of the Eastown, Detroit neighbor- 
hood, by acquiring one-half of the 
bonds and serving an ouster notice. 

Following Wisper's move, Trendle 
filed charges with the grievance board 
alleging improper interference with 
negotiation of a lease. The case is 
to be heard next week. 



Drop Adrienne Ames 

Hollywood, July 9. — Paramount 
has dropped its option on Adrienne 
Ames. She is negotiating with Radio 
where her husband, Bruce Cabot, is 
under contract. 



Hollywood, July 9. — E m a n u e 1 
Cohen is on a week's, vacation, desti- 
nation unknown. * 



Take BloomHeld House 

Rapf & Ruden have taken over the 
Royal in Bloomfield, N. J., from 
Warners and will run the house in 
conjunction with the Bellevue, Upper 
Montclair ; the Broadmoor, Bloom- 
field, and the Park, Caldwell, N. J. 



Wright Loses His Suit 

Los Angeles, July 9. — Harold Bell 
Wright, novelist, has lost his suit 
against Sol Lesser and Michael Ros- 
enberg over the talking picture rights 
to "When a Man's a Man." 



Form Temple Clubs 

Shirley Temple Clubs have been 
formed in Providence, Kansas City 
and Chicago. The clubs are made up 
of mothers and daughters. 



Para. Gets $31,000 
On "Make Up," Baer 

"Kiss and Make Up" with Max 
Baer on the stage grossed $31,000 
at the Paramount. 

"Black Moon" reached only $9,000 
in six days at the Rialto. In five 
days of a second week with "Dr. 
Monica" and two days of "Midnight 
Alibi," the Strand reached $11,000. 

"Baby, Take a Bow" garnered 
$8,500 last Sunday and is being held 
for a third week at the Roxy. 



'Dynamite' Is Detroit 
Lead; Gets $19,500 



Detroit, July 9. — Top honors on the 
week went to "Strictly Dynamite" and 
a stage show headed by Lupe Velez 
at the Fox. The take went up to 
$19,500, topping normal by $4,500. 

"Operator 13" was a disappoint- 
ment at the Michigan, getting only 
$18,200. The stage show included 
eight acts headed by Block & Sully. 

Total first run business was $48,200. 
Average is $55,000. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 5 : 

"MANY HAPPY RETURNS" (Para.) 

FISHER— (2,975), 15c-50c, 7 days. Gross: 
$3,900. (Average, $10,000.) 

"STRICTLY DYNAMITE" (Radio; 

FOX — (5,100), 15c-50c, 7 days. Stage: 
Lupe Velez. Gross: $19,500. (Average, 
$15,000.) 

"OPERATOR 13" (M-G-M) 

MICHIGAN — (4.100), 15c-50c, 7 days. 
Stage: Block & Sully heading eight vaude- 
ville acts. Gross: $18,200. (Average, 
$20,000.) 

"GREAT FLIRTATION" (Para.) 

UNITED ARTISTS— (2,070). 25c-50c. 7 
days. Gross: $6,600. (Average, $10,000.) 

Samuelson Says Two 
Allied Groups Gain 

Returning from special sessions of 
the Allied units of Western New York 
and Wisconsin, Sidney Samuelson, 
president of the national organization, 
sees these individual organizations 
gaining in strength and making steady 
headway. 

While Samuelson was away, he was 
sick seven days and lost 14 pounds. 



One of you reporter/ 
/ee if he i/ at the 
MAYFLOWER^^t/ 





Seasoned observers know where 
to locate visitors from all over the 
world whose names mean news 

Air-Cooled Restaurants — 1000 Beautifully 
and Comfortably Furnished Rooms, All with 
Bath, Circulating Ice Water, Oscillating Fans 

Washington's Finest Hotel 
Mr. R. L. Pollio. Manaser 



V 

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\0 

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The Leading 

■Newspaper 




Picture 
Industry 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Alert, 
Intelligent 

Faithful h / 
Service to 
the Industry 
in All 
Branches 



VOL. 36. NO. 8 



NEW YORK, WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 1934 



TEN CENTS 



Briefs Asked 
In ITOASuit 
Against Campi 

Court Reserves Decision 
Pending Their Study 



Decision was reserved yesterday by 
Federal Judge Henry W. Goddard in 
the suit of the I. T. O. A. for a tem- 
porary injunction to enjoin Campi and 
local clearance and zoning boards 
from refusing to hear complaints filed 
by non-assentors. 

Milton C. Weisman represented the 
exhibitor organization and stated the 
members of the I. T. O. A. were 
ready to pay assessments under the 
code, but did not want to sign and 
thereby give up their constitutional 
rights. He said the membership was 
living up to all provisions of the code 

(Continued on page 7) 

Import Curb Lifted 
By Czechoslovakia 

By JOACHIM K. RUTENBERG 

Berlin, July 10.— American com- 
panies are expected to return to 
Czecho-Slovakia after a two-year ab- 
sence as a result of the removal of 
the 20,000 crown import license and 
the removal of quota restrictions. 

The 20,000-crown tax— about $600 
— was levied against every American 
importation and the quota law re- 
quired that one in every seven dis- 
tributed by American companies 
should be of Czecho-Slovakian origin. 
The law was passed after consider- 
able agitation by native producers. 

During the two-year absence of 
American distributors agitation for 
loosening the restrictions has been 

(Continued on page 8) 



No G. B.-U. A. Deal, 
States Silverstone 

By BRUCE ALLAN 

London, July 10. — Maurice Silver- 
5tone, recently elevated to the general 
nanagership of United Artists in Eu- 
rope, today declared he had no knowl- 
edge of reports current in New York 
:hat his company is negotiating to 
landle Gaumont British product in the 
States. Joseph M. Schenck was on 
the continent today. 



\FWC Foreclosure Is 
Set Back on Coast 



\ Los Angeles, July 10. — Although 
foreclosure sale of Fox West Coast 
^vas tentatively slated to come up be- 
fore Judge James in the U. S. Dis- 
trict Court here today, the proceeding 
(Continued on page 2) 



Zanuek 's Idea to See Pope 
Finds Hays Office Chilly 



If Darryl F. Zanuck contemplates 
discussing the Catholic Church move- 
ment aimed at objectionable films with 
the Pope, assuming he can arrange an 
audience, the step will be undertaken 
with no approval of the Hays office. 

Officially striking the attitude that 
no cable seeking authorization to pro- 
ceed along such lines had been re- 
ceived here and no definite decision 
consequently had been made, the Hays 
office yesterday implied definitely it 

(Continued on page 6) 



Local Church 
Film Attack 
At Standstill 



Local moves in the church clean 
film campaign were at a standstill 
yesterday. No invitation to a confer- 
ence with producers was received at 
the Hays office. 

At Mgr. Michael J. Lavelle's office 
it was stated that he and Rev. Joseph 
A. McCaffrey, members of the inter- 
denominational committee appointed at 
a conference Monday, were out of town 
and would be away until tomorrow. 
Rev. Dr. Walter M. Hewlett, Greater 

(Continued on page 6) 



Ontario Bars 7 Now 
Under Catholic Ban 

Toronto, July 10. — The first reac- 
tion in Canada to the campaign against 
objectionable films in the United States 
was announcement today by Chair- 
man J. C. Boylen of the Ontario cen- 
sor board that seven pictures in a 
list of 31 declared immoral by Cath- 
olics had been banned in the province. 

Fourteen of the pictures have been 
approved after revision, while 10 have 

(Continued on page 6) 



Race Mixing Stirs 
Louisville Feeling 

Louisville, July 10. — Some resent- 
ment has been voiced here of late 
by filmgoers against the mixing of 
colored performers with white in mu- 
sical and dance numbers. 

This resentment does not extend to 
outstanding performers like the Mills 
Brothers and others, but applies to 
those scenes where it is implied the 
races are mixing on an equality basis. 



May Drop Plan 

Philadelphia, July l(h— Film 
Row today heard the report 
that the plan for a concerted 
closing of Warner and M. P. 
T. O. of Eastern Pennsylvania 
member theatres will be 
dropped quietly. 

Lew Pizor and Charles Se- 
gall, representing the M. P. 
T. O., are expected to confer 
with Joseph Bernhard, gener- 
al manager of Warner the- 
atres, tomorrow in New York 
on the decision. 



Several efforts to reach Jo- 
seph Bernhard last night 
proved unavailing. His of- 
fice reported he was in a 
meeting and could not be 
reached. 



K. C. Schedule 
Hits Doubles; 
May Tip Rates 



Kansas City, July 10. — The new 
clearance schedule for Kansas City, 
adopted by the local clearance and zon- 
ing board, is considered a lever to lift 
the present low level of first and sub- 
sequent run admission prices. By set- 
ting back availability on double bills 
at subsequents and by reducing the 
clearance for first runs maintaining 
this practice, the new plan is regarded 

(Continued on page 7) 



Carter Barron Gets 
New Post in Loew's 

Carter Barron moves up the line in 
the shift of Loew district managers 
which takes H. M. Addison from 
Cleveland to Boston as reported in 
Motion Picture Daily yesterday. 

Barron has been city manager in 
Washington. As district manager 
now, he will continue to handle that 

(Continued on page 2) 



Cleveland Dual End 
Stirs No Complaint 

Cleveland, July 10. — The public 
appears to be reacting favorably to the 
single feature policy now in effect in 

(Continued on page 8) 



Para/s Three 
Trustees Stay 
UnderNewAct 



Judge Coxe Holds Them 
After Hearing Counsel 



Declaring he had no alternative 
after hearing counsel for various 
stockholders' and bondholders' groups, 
Judge Alfred C. Coxe in U. S. Dis- 
trict Court yesterday named Charles 
D. Hilles, Eugene W. Leake and 
Charles E. Richardson as permanent 
trustees under the new bankruptcy 
law. 

These men have been in the status 
of temporary trustees since the recent 
application for permission to reorgan- 
ize under the new bankruptcy law. 
Prior to that they had functioned un- 
der the old bankruptcy laws. Their 
continuance in office is regarded as 
hastening the company's reorganiza- 
tion. 

At the opening of the hearing the 
question arose as to whether Richard- 
son was willing to serve as permanent 

(Continued on page 8) 



Goldman Lines Up 
New Penn Circuit 

Philadelphia, July 10. — Formal 
announcement of the formation of Wil- 
liam Goldman Theatres, Inc., a new 
independent circuit, to operate in 
Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Mary- 
land will be made tomorrow by Wil- 
liam Goldman, former Stanley-War- 
ner head. 

The outfit is understood to have a 

(Continued on page 8) 



St. Louis Awaiting 
Next Warner Step 

St. Louis, July 10. — There is some 
speculation here as to the next move 
of Warners now that transfer of the 
Ambassador, Missouri and Grand Cen- 
tral Theatres to F. & M. management 
seems certain. 

At present Warners have the Shu- 
bert and there are reports they will 
take over the Orpheum. 



Chicago Allied Will 
Oppose B. & K. Move 

Chicago, July 10. — Allied Theatres 
of Illinois will oppose the plan of 
B. & K. seeking an extra or "dead" 
week protection in the local zoning 
scheme, according to Aaron Saper- 
stein. Allied feels, according to Sa- 
perstein, that B. & K. has all the 
(Continued on page 7) 



! 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Wednesday, July II, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



(Registered U. S. Patent Office) 



Vol. 36 



July 11, 1934 



No. 8 




Martin Quigley 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 
MAURICE KANN 

Editor 
JAMES A. CRON 
Advertising Manager 



Published daily except Sunday and holi- 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub- 
sidiary of Quigley Publications, Inc., 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 1790 Broadway, New 
York. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Cable ad- 
dress "Quigpubco, New York." All con- 
tents copyrighted 1934 by Motion Picture 
Daily, Inc. Address all correspondence to 
the New York Office. Other Quigley pub- 
lications: MOTION PICTURE HERALD, 
BETTER THEATRES, THE MOTION 
PICTURE ALMANAC and THE CHI- 
CAGOAN. 

Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Life 
Building, Vine and Yucca Streets, Victor 
M. Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 407 
South Dearborn Street, Edwin S. Clif- 
ford, manager; London Bureau: Remo 
House, 310 Regent St., London, W. 1, 
Bruce Allan, Representative. Cable address: 
"Quigpubco, London"; Berlin Bureau: 
Berlin - Tempelhof , Kaiserin - Augustastrasse 
28, Joachim K. Rutenberg, Representative; 
Paris Bureau: 19, Rue de la Cour des- 
Noues, Pierre Autre, Representative; Rome 
Bureau: Viale Gorizia, Vittorio Malpassuti, 
Representative; Sydney Bureau: 102 Sus- 
sex Street, Cliff Holt, Representative; Mex- 
ico City Bureau: Apartado 269, James 
Lockhart, Representative; Glasgow Bureau: 
86 Dundrennan Road, G. Holmes, Repre- 
sentative; Budapest Bureau: 11 Olasz 
Fasor 17, Endre Hevesi, Representative. 

Entered as second class matter January 
4, 1926 at the Post Office at New York 
City, N. Y., under Act of March 3, 1S79. 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada $15 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 



New Group Elects 

Atlanta, July 10. — Ike Katz of 
Montgomery has been named head of 
the newly organized Georgia-Ten- 
nessee - Florida - Alabama Theatre 
Ass'n. Other officers are: W. L. 
Coart, Atlanta, treasurer ; A. J. Bene- 
dict, Atlanta, secretary; Mrs. C. B. 
Ellis of Atlanta, Sam Borinsky of 
Chattanooga and H. H. Waters of 
Birmingham, state vice-presidents. 



France Bars U. S. Film 

Paris, July 10. — A temporary but 
complete embargo was declared today 
by France on American raw sensi- 
tized film for screen cameras. The 
purpose is to insure employment to 
its own people by requiring American 
firms to manufacture in France all 
film intended for sale in the country. 



/. R. Grainger Feted 

The six-week period between July 
23 and September 1 has been desig- 
nated by Carl Laemmle in a cable 
from Vienna as Jimmy Grainger Cele- 
bration. This period will also mark 
the first anniversary of Grainger's as- 
sociation with Universal as general 
sales manager. 



Vergesslich Joins 

Herman Gluckman, president of 
Majestic and Capitol exchange, yes- 
terday closed a deal for J. J. Ver- 
gesslich to manage both New York 
branches. He was formerly branch 
manager for Warners here, 



G, H. Stone at Work 
On Chinese Shorts 



Hollywood, July 10. — Grant H. 
Stone, heading the newly organized 
Prizmatic Prod., Inc., using the Cine- 
color process, has thrown his hat into 
the Chinese film market arena as his 
initial production effort. Dr. Fung 
Pochee, former technical advisor at 
Fox, has been made production chief 
in charge of the filming of a color 
short series for distribution in the 
Orient. A deal for the handling of 
26 color shorts for local distribution 
is likely to be closed within a week. 

Stone, who did all the color pho- 
tography on "The Maiden Voyage of 
Valero III" the voyage to the Gala- 
pagos Islands of the Capt. G. Allan 
Hancock expedition in the interests of 
the California Academy of Sciences, 
figures to have three Chinese shorts 
in work all the time, when actual 
production gets under way. Dr. 
Pochee is now making final arrange- 
ments for distribution. Robert Cary 
is the other chief member of the firm. 



London Films Ready 
To Start New Plant 

London, July 10. — Plans to build a 
studio of four stages at Elstree have 
just been completed by London Films. 
A 40-acre tract has been acquired and 
all construction work is expected to 
be completed in about six months. 



First announcement of the proposed 
expansion of London Films was made 
in a story cabled to Motion Picture 
Daily from London several weeks 
ago. 



Carter Barron Gets 
New Post in Loew's 

(Continued from page 1) 

city and take over Harrisburg, Wil- 
mington, Reading. Norfolk, Baltimore 
and Richmond. Harry Long, who has 
been handling this district, takes over 
Addison's houses in Cleveland. 

Transfer of Addison to Boston 
brings W. A. ("Billy") Downs into 
New York on Charles C. Moskowitz's 
staff. He will handle theatres which 
have been under the aegis of George 
Schenck, now ill. Included are the 
Metropolitan, Melba and Loew the- 
atres in Borough Park and Coney 
Island. 



Await New York 

Los Angeles, July 10. — 
Charles Skouras, one of the 
trustees of Fox West Coast, 
today declared no new devel- 
opments in the reorganiza- 
tion of the circuit will be un- 
dertaken pending arrival here 
of financial and legal lights 
from New York. 



Chase National representa- 
tives, bulwarked by lawyers, 
are expected to head west 
sometime next week on 
F. W. C. reorganization de- 
tail. 



FWC Foreclosure Is 
Set Back on Coast 

(Continued from page 1) 
has been delayed until later in the 
month. The delay is due to the mass 
of details which must be ironed out 
before the sale can take place. 

A reorganization plan which will 
call for a new holding company to 
replace Wesco with S. R. Kent at the 
head of it will be submitted at the 
same time for court approval. 



To Show "Cucaracha" 

Radio will have a preview of its new 
color short, "La Cucaracha," at the 
Waldorf-Astoria tomorrow. This film 
was reviewed by Motion Picture 
Daily on July 7. It is the first film 
made in the new Technicolor process 
and was produced by John Hay Whit- 
ney and Cornelius Vanderbilt Whit- 
ney under the firm name of Pioneer 
Pictures, Inc. 



New Mae West Title 

Hollywood, July 10. — Mae West's 
new picture, originally called "It 
Ain't No Sin" by Paramount, has been 
changed to "The Belle of New Or- 
leans" and will be released under that 
title. 



N.O. Hits Mae West Title 

New Orleans, July 10.— Renaming 
of Mae West's "It Ain't No Sin" as 
"The Belle of New Orleans" drew 
protests today from civic and political 
bodies here. 



Trading Light On Big Board 



High Low Close 

Consolidated Film Industries, pfd 14 13% 14 

Eastman Kodak 98^4 97% 98 

Fox Film "A" 13 12% 13 

Loew's, Inc 27% 27% 

Paramount Publix 4 3% 3% 

Pathe Exchange 2% 2% 2% 

Pathe Exchange "A" 20% 20% 20% 

RKO 2% 2% 2% 

Universal Pictures, pfd 39 39 39 

Warner Bros 4% 454 4% 

Sentry Off 1-16 on Curb 

High Low Close 

Sentry Safety Control 3/16 % % 

Technicolor 12% 12% 12% 

Trans Lux 1% 1% 1% 

Pathe Bonds Gain x /% 

High Low Close 

General Theatre Equipment 6s '40 7% 7% 754 

General Theatre Equipment 6s '40, ctf 7% 7% 7 Z A 

Keith B. F. 6s '46 67% 67% 67% 

Loew's 6s '41, ww deb rights 100% 10054 100% 

Paramount F. L. 6s '47 48% 48% 48% 

Paramount Publix 5%s '50 4954 48% 4954 

Pathe 7s '37, ww 99% 99% 99% 

Warner Bros. 6s '39, wd 54% 54 54 



Net 

Change Sales 

400 

+ % 400 

400 

+ % 3,200 

+ % 3,600 

400 

+ 54 200 

700 

+1 10 

— % 4,000 



Net 
Change 

— 1/16 
+ % 



Net 
Change 

- % / 

- % 

- % 



- % 
+ 55 
+ % 



Sales 

100 
600 
100 



Sales 
11 
11 
3 
9 
1 
7 
3 
50 



i Purely 
Personal ► 

ALBERT EARLY ROBINSON 
and his wife are in from Kansas 
City where the former is a member of 
the Star staff. He has written a clay 
titled "The Week-End of a Pirate." 

Emil Forst, of the Universal 
scenario department, sails for Europe 
Saturday on the Champlain to pur- 
chase continental stage shows. 

Diana Wynyard and Frank Law- 
ton sail tomorrow on the Aquitania 
for England. 

King Vidor arrives in town this 
week with a print of his "Our Daily 
Bread." 

Jacques Chatelain, French film 
player, arrives today on the Cham- 
plain. 

Howard S. Cullman returns from 
Washington today. He was there for 
a day. 

Jack Partington returns today 
from a brief vacation. 



'Nell Gwyn' Preview 
Attracts Notables 

More than 500 exhibitors, circuit 
buyers and representatives of the 
stage, screen and press attended last 
night's special preview of British & 
Dominion's "Nell Gwyn" at the Astor. 
Among those in the audience were : 
David W. Griffith, Walter Wanger, AJ 
Lichtman, Harry D. Buckley, Percy Phillip- 
son, Walter Futter, Hal Home, Harry 
Charnas, Gus Edwards, Martin Quigley, 
Colvin Brown, Mike Vogel, Leo Brady, 
William Boehnel, Regina Crewe, J. M. 
Jerauld, Louis Sobol, Paul Yawitz, Leo 
Brady, J. D. Williams, Bruce Gallup, Jack 
Alicoate, Harry M. Goetz. 

Following the preview, Herbert Wil- 
cox entertained at a buffet in the grand 
ballroom of the Astor. Four hundred 
attended. There was dancing with 
music supplied by an eight piece or- 
chestra. 



"Affairs" Stirs Portland 

Portland, July 10.— The brightest 
spot on the drab theatrical map here 
is the Music Box where "Affairs of 
a Gentleman" and Ted Fiorita and 
his band have taken $1,800 for an 
opening day. This is in the face of 
a continuance of the waterfront 
strike and the prospect of a general 
strike. 



Fox Signs Swanson 

Hollywood, July 10.— Gloria Swan- 
son has been signed by Fox to appear 
in her first musical comedy, "Music 
in the Air," which will be directed 
by Erich Pommer. John Boles and 
Douglass Montgomery are co-starred 
with her. 



219 for Germany 

Berlin, July 10.— During the 1934- 
35 season 117 German films will be 
produced and 68 American features 
will be imported. Imports from other 
countries will total 34. 



Robbed at Reopening 

Toronto, July 10.— Three months 
ago the Danforth theatre was wrecked 
by fire. Saturday night it was re- 
opened as the Century and was robbed 
of $350. 



"You were 
born to be 
kissed . . ♦ 



The bands are 
playing it! Every 
day it's plugged 
on the radio! A 
hit song telling the 
world gaily about 
a hit pictur~ 





t 



EXTRA ! 
PREVIEW ! 

Hollywood Reporter says: 
" 'BORN TO BE KISSED' is bright 
and filled with laughs. Grand 
entertainment. Harlow at her best. 



Simply swell in addition to being 
luscious eyeful!" 

HARLOW 

BORN TO BE KISSED" 
th LIONEL BARRYMORE 

FRANCHOT TONE • LEWIS STONE 

JACK CONWAY, Director 

Produced By Bernard H. Hyman 

In the M-Q-M Manner! 



L 



;„f'.' 





An eminent doctor . . . branded "murderer" by a 

hasty world. A beautiful woman . . . enmeshed in a 

hateful marriage. Both seek escape on a strange 

journey ... that leads to stranger adventures. 

From the best-selling novel 
that thrilled America 




BAXTER 



in 



GRAND CANARY 



with 



MADGE EVANS 

Marjorie Rambeau • Zita Johann 
Roger Imhof • H.B.Warner 

Directed by IRVING CUMMINGS 

From the novel by A. J. Cronin Screen play by Ernest Pascal 




PICTURE 



A JESSE L. LASKY PRODUCTION 



6 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Wedneiday, July II, 1934 



Local Church 
Film Attack 
At Standstill 

(Continued from page 1) 

New York Federation of Churches, 
was also out of town. 

Cardinal Hayes' office confirmed the 
fact that he would issue a statement 
on the film situation, but said that it 
probably would not be forthcoming 
until later in the week. 



Hollywood, July 10— Will H. 
Hays refused to comment today on 
Rev. Joseph A. McCaffrey's sugges- 
tion that he resign his post as head of 
the M. P. P. D. A. Later, but 
through a spokesman, the suggestion 
was called "absurd." 

In his formal statement, Hays re- 
ferred to the clean film campaign and 
criticism directed at the industry as 
follows: "Some of it may be justified; 
some may be entirely unwarranted- 
all of it is understood, none of it is 
resented," 

Hays and Joseph I. Breen will call 
a general meeting this week for a 
general discussion on administration 
of the code of morals and other means 
of combating the present reform move- 
ment. 



Mrs. Roosevelt Lauds 
Self-Regulation Move 

Chicago, July 10. — In her debut as 
a radio commentator in a broadcast 
from the World's Fair, Mrs. Franklin 
D. Roosevelt last night praised the 
self-regulatory measures of the indus- 
try as a right step in the campaign to 
improve the tone of screen entertain- 
ment. 

Mrs. Roosevelt expressed herself as 
"extremely happy" at the industry's 
appointment of Joseph I. Breen to pass 
on films on the ground that "the mat- 
ter of moving pictures is very impor- 
tant to the whole country." 



General Boycott in 
St. Louis Is Denied 

St. Louis, July 10. — Archbishop 
John J. Glennon, head of the Catholic 
Church in this section, has not re- 
ceded from his position that theatres 
that show any immoral pictures must 
suffer lack of patronage on those 
nights on which good pictures are 
shown, but he has not yet taken the 
position that it is a sin for a Catholic 
to attend a picture theatre at any time. 
Should such a drastic step be taken 
many feel it would be disastrous for 
local theatres since there are 340,000 
Catholics in St. Louis and about 500,- 
000 in the St. Louis archdiocese, 
which covers a large part of Missouri. 

Many leading Protestant and Jew- 
ish leaders locally have indorsed the 
film fight being conducted by the 
Catholic Legion of Decency. It is es- 
timated that 500,000 men, women and 
children in eastern Missouri alone 
have joined the fight and pledged 
themselves to stay away from pro- 
scribed pictures. 

In the meantime Catholic leaders 
are consolidating the legion move- 
ment. Through the Sunday Visitor, 
Queen's Work and other Catholic 
publications those in the St. Louis 
archdiocese are being kept informed 



Would Cancel 

Chicago, July 10. — An ex- 
hibitor here has knocked the 
local code board office dizzy. 
Following publication Satur- 
day and Sunday of the picture 
classifications of the Legion 
of Decency he applied at the 
code office for a form to se- 
cure cancellation of virtually 
all pictures banned by the 
Church. 

Offered the standard 10 per 
cent cancellation form, he re- 
fused to accept. He wants a 
bigger and better form to 
give scope to his cancelling 
proclivities under the coun- 
cil's lineup. 



of the situation throughout the coun- 
try. The papers carry a list of the 
undesirable pictures, those that have 
objectionable scenes and those that are 
considered suitable for Catholic pat- 
ronage. 



Better Films Group 
Seeks Church Tieup 

East St. Louis, 111., July 10. — 
Plans to enlist churches here in their 
work have been made by the East St. 
Louis Better Films Council. Elsie 
Clanahan, president, has urged mem- 
bers to remember "your ticket as your 
ballot" in working for clean films. 

Mrs. John E. Weese, vice-president, 
reported the films recommended this 
week. Reports of her reviewers are 
posted weekly in the Public Library, 
Community House, Notre Dame Acad- 
emy, Belleville and other schools. 

Urges Buffalo Diocese 
To Strengthen Legion 

Buffalo, July 10. — Bishop William 
Turner of the Catholic diocese of Buf- 
falo, in a letter to priests of the 232 
parishes and 36 missions in his dio- 
cese, pledged his wholehearted co-op- 
eration to the Legion of Decency drive 
for clean films and asked the pastors 
to organize units of the League in 
their parishes. 

Dean S. Whitney Hale of St. Paul's 
Episcopal Cathedral has indorsed the 
Catholic drive. 



3,200 More Sign 

Englewood, N. J., July 10. — More 
than 3,200 persons have signed the 
pledge of the Legion of Decency at 
St. Cecilia R. C. Church, of which 
2,000 are members of the parish and 
the remainder visitors to the Shrine. 
Father Albert H. Dolan is directing 
organization of the legion in this city. 



MPPDA Cold 
To Zanuck Idea 
To See Pope 



(.Continued from page 1) 

would keep its hands free of any such 
potential entanglement. 

According to Associated Press dis- 
patches from Rome, Zanuck had made 
up his mind the film campaign was an 
issue he ought to discuss with the 
Vatican. He was quoted as stating 
he hoped for an opportunity to con- 
vince the Pope that not all films made 
here are objectionable. Also he con- 
templated urging that the campaign 
not blacklist good pictures. 

Ontario Bars 7 Now 
Under Catholic Ban 

(Continued from page 1) 

not been submitted to Boylen for ex- 
amination by distributors. 

The titles of the condemned fea- 
tures have been withheld. Boylen ex- 
plained that a picture found objection- 
able by a religious group in the States 
might not be the same in its entirety 
upon reaching the Canadian public 
because of censorship. 

Stover Hits Producers 

Hershey, Pa., July 10. — Dr. Ross 
Stover of Philadelphia blamed the 
present film campaign on the attitude 
of producers. He told the 19th bien- 
nial convention of the Christian En- 
deavor Union today that the situation 
had been brought about by those "in 
power and authority" who have taken 
"the modern American attitude of 'I 
want what I want when I want it.' " 



Clarksville Endorses 

Louisville, Ky., July 10. — Accord- 
ing to word received in Louisville, the 
Clarksville, Tenn., Ministers' Ass'n. 
has indorsed "the courageous stand" 
of the Catholic Church in regard to 
clean films and has asked Rev. Arthur 
E. Whittle, rector of Trinity Episco- 
pal Church, to deliver a sermon 
against bad pictures. 

Asks Boycott Observance 

Wilmington, Del., July 10. — Speak- 
ing in support of the general boycott 
of salacious pictures, Rev. J. Francis 
Tucker of St. Anthony's Catholic 
Church, in a sermon, admonished his 
parishioners to refrain from attending 
films "until such time as Hollywood 
definitely decides to clean house." 



"Bondage" Is 
$94,500 Draw 
At Music Hall 



"Of Human Bondage" stirred up the 
biggest gross in many weeks at the 
RKO Music Hall. In seven days the 
take went to $94,500 in spite of the 
heat and the out-of-town holiday at- 
tractions. 

"The Thin Man," helped by Duke 
Ellington and his band, was not out- 
standing at the Capitol with $39,800. 
"Kiss and Make Up," with Max Baer 
on the stage, held the Paramount to 
$31,000. 

The Roxy had a good week, com- 
paratively, at $29,000 on "Baby Take 
a Bow." 

Estimated takings : 

Week Ending July 3: 

"BLACK MOON" (Col.) 

RIALTO— (2,200), 25c-65c, 6 days. Gross: 

$8,500. 

Week Ending July 4: 

"OF HUMAN BONDAGE" (Radio) 

RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL— (5,945), 
35c-$1.65, 7 days. Stage show. Gross: $94,- 

500. 

Week Ending July 5: 
"THE THIN MAN" (M-G-M) 

CAPITOL— (4,700), 35c-$1.65, 7 days. 
Stage: Duke Ellington and orchestra and 
Harlem Revue. Gross: $39,800. 
"MANY HAPPY RETURNS" (Para.) 
PALACE— (2,500), 25c-75c, 7 days. Vaude- 
ville. Gross: $9,200. 

"KISS AND MAKE UP" (Para.) 
PARAMOUNT— (3,700), 35c-99c, 8 days. 
Stage: Max Baer and others. Gross: $31,000. 
"BABY, TAKE A BOW" (Fox) 
ROXY— (6,200), 25c-55c, 7 days. Stage 
show. Gross: $29,000. 

"DR. MONICA" (Warners) 
(2nd week, 5 days) 
"MIDNIGHT ALIBI" (Warners) 
(2 days) 

STRAND— (2,000), 25c-$1.10, 7 days. Gross: 
$11,000. 

Week Ending July 6: 

"LITTLE MAN, WHAT NOW?" (Univ.) 
(4 days) 

"SISTERS UNDER THE SKIN" (Col.) 
(3 days) 

RKO CENTER— (3,700), 25c-55c, 7 davs. 
Gross: $4,900. 

Week Ending July 9: 

"CIRCUS CLOWN" (Warners) 
CANNONERI-KLICK FIGHT 

MAYFAIR— (2,300), 35c-85c, 12 days. 
Gross: $7,600. 

"Winters" Is a Hit 
In Cities of Ohio 

Cincinnati, July 10. — The recent 
delay of the film arbiters at Columbus 
in passing "The Life of Vergie 
Winters," which made the front page 
of most dailies, appears to have in- 
trigued the curiosity of the public. 
The picture crashed through to an 
estimated $11,000 at the RKO Albee 
last week, one of the biggest grosses 
recorded at this house in many moons. 
This rates a holdover. 

Proportionately heavy grosses are 
reported from Cleveland and Colum- 
bus last week. 

In Cleveland the picture has been 
held for a second week at the RKO 
Palace, while in Columbus it has 
been moved from the RKO Palace to 
the Majestic for another week. 



Mid-Ocean Chartered 

Dover, Del., July 10.— Mid-Ocean 
Motion Picture Corp., listing a capital 
of $2,000,000 and 35,000 shares, no par 
value, has been chartered to develop 
and distribute films. The incorpora- 
tors are D. B. Hilliard, R. M. Hil- 
liard and E. C. Shockley of Wilming- 
ton. 



Hollywood Personals 

Hollywood, July 10. — Freddie March wanted a portable dressing 
room at U. A. and spent $1,500 to get it. Equipped with bunks and 
other nautical gadgets. . . . Nat Pendleton, former ear scrambler, 
has hired a bodyguard. Says he's getting timid from playing so 
many tough guy roles. . . . Al Santell has completed a new home 
at Idyllwild. Now working on plans for a tennis court and, of 
course, a swimming pool. . . . Joe E. Brown now can sip his mint 
juleps with dignity. He's a Kentucky colonel. . . . Stepin Fetchit 
still wants to star in his original, "Design for Loafing." . . . Monta 
Bell looking forward to a 10-week vacation in Yurrop in the 
Fall. . . . Adrian playing jokes on Kathleen Howard over the 
phone. . . . George Barbier gone showy. Now has a new Pierce. . . . 
Buddy Schulberg will study Russian cinema technique in Mos- 
cow. . . . 



Wednesday, July II, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



7 



K. C. Schedule 
Hits Doubles; 
May Tip Rates 

(Continued from page 1) 

as encouraging adoption of single fea- 
tures. 

The new schedule provides clear- 
ances for theatres located within the 
corporate limits of Kansas City and 
the trade area. It is to become effec- 
tive with the showing of 1934-35 pro- 
duct, and provides : 

Single feature first runs at 25 cents 
nights, 21 days over any first single fea- 
ture suburban run charging 25 cents. First 
runs in this classification get the follow- 
ing clearance over other single feature sub- 
sequents: 28 days over second suburban 
run charging 25 cents; 35 days over other 
subsequents at 25 cents; 56 days over 20- 
cent houses; 70 days over 15-cent spots; 
M days over 10-cent houses. 

Single feature first runs charging 25 
cents or less showing a single feature 
receive, in addition, clearance of 30 days 
over subsequents exhibiting such picture 
on a double bill. 

Clearance for first runs showing one 
feature at more than 25 cents are provided 
as follows over single feature subsequents: 
35 days over first suburban run at 25 cents: 
2S days over first suburban run charging 
more than 25 cents nights; 42 days over 
second suburban run at 25 cents', 49 days 
over other subsequent runs charging 25 
cents; 70 days over 20-cent houses; 98 days 
over 15-cent houses; 154 days over 10-cent 
spots. 

More Clearance for Singles 

First runs with singles charging more 
than 25 cents get an additional 60 days 
over subsequents dual billing at 25 cents 
or more; and 90 days extra over 20-cent 
dual houses. 

Dual first runs lose one-half the normal 
clearance over single run subsequents. First 
runs on a double bill become available to 
subsequent run double bills according to the 
regular clearance. 

Clearance over first runs in the colored 
zone is 14 days after regular first run. 
Clearance over the Paseo, Kansas City, 
Mo., while not within the corporate limits, 
is governed by the clearance prescribed 
for other suburbans. 

Subsequent runs not having a fixed daily 
admission price are classified as charging 
five cents less than the regular price for 
such theatre. The regular admission price 
is to be determined by taking the price 
that prevails the greater number of days 
in the week. This provision is also for 
Kansas City, Kan. 

First runs in Kansas City, Mo., charg- 
ing 25 cents or less receive the following 
clearances over Kansas City, Kan.: 14 
days over Kansas City, Kan., first runs 
charging 25 cents at night; 28 days over 
20 cents; 42 days over 15 cents; 56 days 
over 10-cent spots. 

i Kansas City. Mo., first runs charging 

more than 25 cents get these clearances over 
'Kansas City, Kan.: 28 days over houses 

charging 25 cents; 42 days over 20 cents; 

70 days over 15 cents; 112 days over 10 

zents. 

The change in clearance prescribed for 
Kansas City, Mo., duals prevails also for 
Kansas City, Kan. 

First runs in Kansas City. Mo., receive 
:he following clearance over these neighbor - 
ng towns: Belton, Mo., 28 days; Blue 
Springs, Mo., 28 days; Bonner Springs, Mo., 
15 days; Buckner. Mo.. 28 days; Fairmount. 
:VIo., 42 days; Grandview, Mo., 28 days: 
' iidependence, Mo., 14 days; Lees Summit. 
Mo., 28 days; Lenexa, Mo., 28 days; Lib- 
:rtv. Mo., 14 days; Maywood, Mo.. 28 days; 
Worth Kansas City, Mo.. 28 days: Olathe. 
5an., 14 days: Overland Park, Kan., 35 
lays; Platte City, Mo., 28 days; Shawnee, 
?an., 35 days. 



Wiles New Plaint in L. A. 

Los Angeles, July 10. — A new com- 
plaint was filed with the local griev- 
ance board today by the Monterey 
^ark Theatre against the Garfield and 
he Cirstrand theatres, accusing them 
f offering tickets as prizes. The 
oard heard five complaints but put 
ff decision until next Thursday. 



Tauber Clicks 

London, July 10. — "Blossom 
Time," starring Richard Tau- 
ber and directed by Paul 
Stein, was a hit at its mid- 
night premiere here at the 
Regal last night. Tauber's 
magnificent singing as Franz 
Schubert was its greatest 
single feature. The general 
artistry and the atmosphere 
of Old Vienna are admirable 
in this romance of the com- 
poser's life. 

"Blossom Time" is easily 
B. I. P.'s best and challenges 
American attention. 

ALLAN 



Virginia Transfer 
Hit by Code Board 

Washington, July 10. — Transfer of 
the Crewe at Crewe, Va., from the 
Crewe Amusement Corp. to Mrs. R. 
D. Bradshaw, wife of the president, 
was ruled an attempt to avoid a con- 
tract with Paramount, following a 
hearing by the grievance board. 

Two cases brought by William H. 
Rippard, operator of the Eaco, Farm- 
ville, Va., were withdrawn. In the 
first Rippard asked 10 per cent can- 
cellation on a Vitagraph contract, and 
in the second he sought relief from 
performance of contracts on the 
ground of substitution of stars. 

A third case brought by Rippard 
asking relief under contracts with 
Vitagraph, Universal, RKO, Fox, 
Paramount and M-G-M was dismissed 
on the ground that the board could 
not alter a contract. 

Sidney Lust complained he couldn't 
get product within a reasonable time 
because Isaac Notes, operator of the 
Leader, had contracts calling from one 
to the fifth run. The case was con- 
tinued for further investigation. 

The clearance and zoning board to- 
day turned down the appeal of John 
Henry Hiser, operator of the State, 
Bethesda, Md., that the 14 days' 
clearance afforded Warners Avalon, 
Washington, be abolished. The board 
ruled that since both houses are in 
the same territory the existing clear- 
ance is fair and reasonable. 

The case of J. L. Whittle of the 
Avenue, Baltimore, against houses op- 
erated in the same city by Frank Dur- 
kee and Louis Gaertner, and that of 
the Byrd Amusement Co., Peters- 
burg, Va., against Loew's and the 
Wilmer and Vincent theatres in Rich- 
mond were put off to July 16. 

The complaints brought by Lloyd 
Wineland of the Fairlawn against 
Warners Avenue and Grand, Harry 
Green of the Carolina and L. Phillips 
of the Academy have been settled 
amicably. Another case settled is 
that of the Capitol against Warners 
Avenue and Grand. 

Lust Is Appointed 
As Appeals Member 

Washington, July 10.— Sidney B. 
Lust, independent operator, has been 
appointed to the Code Authority Ap- 
peals Committee. He is already a 
member of the clearance and zoning 
board. 



Fire at M-G-M Studio 

Hollywood, July 10. — Fire on the 
stage of the M-G-M studio at noon 
today caused $5,000 damage. Produc- 
tion will not be affected. 



St. Louis Clearance 
Disputes Ruled Upon 

Sr. Louis, July 10. — Clearance and 
zoning board has ruled that St. Louis 
first runs shall have 28 days' clearance 
over Belleville, 111. This is the same 
margin that these houses enjoy over 
East St. Louis. 

In the clearance dispute between the 
Fox Illinois, Centralia, 111., and the 
Playhouse, that city, the board voted 
to reduce the clearance of the former 
from 180 days to 90 days, provided 
pictures are played within 35 days 
after their availability at Centralia, and 
provided also that the Playhouse main- 
tains a minimum admission of 20 cents 
for adults and 10 cents for children. 
Should these price scales be disre- 
garded, the protest against the 180 
days' clearance will not be allowed. 

The board ruled against the Palm 
Theatre, St. Louis, which had sought 
to be taken out of the zone with the 
Aubert and placed in the zone with 
the Mikado. 

Redmon's Majestic, East St. Louis, 
has appealed from the decision of the 
board which ruled that that house 
should have no clearance over the the- 
atres in Belleville, 111. Publix Great 
States Theatres, Quincy and Spring- 
field, has taken an appeal from the 
adverse rulings of the board in the 
clearance dispute involving theatres 
in Palmyra and Hannibal, Mo., and 
Barry, Mount Sterling, Carthage, 
Pawnee, Waverly, Edinburg, Chat- 
ham, Tallula and Beardstown, 111. 

The grievance board has denied both 
protests in the dispute between the 
Illiana Theatre Co., operator of the 
Grand, Hillsboro, 111., and Ed Fellis 
of the Orpheum, Hillsboro, and has 
decided to notify distributors that both 
houses admitted charging 10 cents in 
apparent violation of contracts. 

Provo's Clearances 
Set After Complaint 

Salt Lake City, July 10. — Clear- 
ances have been set for Provo and 
surrounding territory. The case came 
up on a complaint of Jack Swenson, 
manager of the Angelus, Spanish 
Fork, in which he asked for elimina- 
tion of the 14 days' clearance held by 
the Paramount at Provo. 

The board decided that Provo first 
runs shall have six months when their 
admissions are 25 cents higher than 
second runs, four months when the 
difference in price is 20 cents, three 
months when the price difference is 
15 cents, and two months on a 10-cent 
difference. 

When houses in surrounding towns 
charge the same scale as the Provo, 
the Provo shall have 14 days' clear- 
ance. 

L. S. Wootton, manager of the Ri- 
voli, Sugar House, has won an order 
from the grievance board ending free 
admissions for women and two-for- 
one tickets. The complaint was aimed 
at C. O. Hauzhurst, Mario, Sugar 
House. 



Denver RulesOut 'Nights' 

Denver, July 10. — Bank nights, 
cash nights and country stores have 
been declared unfair competition by 
the local grievance board, which has 
ordered six theatres to end the prac- 
tice by July 17. The defendants will 
appeal. The complaint against the 
Harry Huffman theatres, which were 
accused of giving away an automo- 
bile weekly, has been thrown out for 
lack of evidence. 



Briefs Asked 
In ITOA Suit 
Against Campi 



(Continued from page 1) 
and that local boards should give 
them a chance to file complaints. He 
also asked that assentors should be 
barred from lodging complaints 
against non-signers until non-signers 
have been given an opportunity to act 
against signers. 

Weisman said that Campi was try- 
ing to force the unit into signing 
the code and, if successful, this would 
deprive I. T. O. A. members of their 
rights in the courts. 

William Whitney, attorney repre- 
senting Campi, argued that exhibitors 
who assent and pay assessments get 
certain advantages under the code, 
giving as an example 10 per cent can- 
cellation. He said persons seeking 
benefits of the code should pay for 
upkeep of local boards. 

Weisman then stated that the code 
is no contract because exhibitors have 
to take all its provisions whether 
they are harmful or not. 

Briefs were ordered filed on Mon- 
day. 



Chicago Allied Will 
Oppose B. & K. Move 

(Continued from page 1) 

protection it needs and any more will 
work a hardship on his membership. 
Allied is satisfied to continue on the 
present basis, Saperstein says. 

A spokesman will be named to set 
forth the Allied stand at Thursday's 
meeting, and it is indicated an ap- 
pointment will be made by Saperstein, 
since, as a member of the clearance 
and zoning board he personally 
doesn't feel that he should be the 
spokesman. 

A record turnout is expected for 
the hearing, which will be held in 
the Gold room of the Congress start- 
ing at 1 o'clock. 



Milwaukee's Indies 
Protest Clearances 

Milwaukee, July 10. — Forty-eight 
Milwaukee independents have wired 
Campi protesting the proposed new 
clearance setup. They claim it favors 
circuits and is detrimental to inde- 
pendents. 

A plan is underway for organiza- 
tion of a new Milwaukee independent 
exhibitors' group. 



Chicago Appeals Heard 

Four Chicago code cases occupied 
the attention of the Campi appeals 
committee yesterday. They included 
B. Banowitz and H. Applebaum, Lit- 
tle Paramount, Chicago, vs. Biograph 
Theatre, same city; George W. Kru- 
ger, Hinsdale Theatre, Hinsdale, 111., 
vs. LaGrange Theatre, LaGrange, 111. ; 
Panorama, Chicago, vs. Sheridan, 
Buckingham, Vogue and Keystone, in 
the same city; Lake Theatre Corp., 
Michigan City, Ind., vs. Tivoli The- 
atre, in the same city. The first three 
were clearance cases, while the fourth 
involved overbuying. 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Looking 'Em Over 



"Nell Gwyn" 

(British and Dominion-United Artists) 

Exactly as "Henry VIII" dipped into the private affairs of that ruler 
of Britain and as "Madame Du Barry" will tell much, if not all, of what 
went on in the court of one of France's many Louis, now comes "Nell 
Gwyn" to narrate considerable of what transpired in the personal life of 
Charles II, another of England's rulers. 

Nell, with a doubtful paternity — actress, rowdy and common — but pos- 
sessed of that which was required to make Charles II forget affairs of 
state and the Duchess of Portsmouth, did her appointed task well enough. 
She knocked 17th century court decorum galley west, embarrassed the 
king much but entertained him more and maintained her hold by her wits 
and nature's endowment until the era ended with the king's death. 

Anna Neagle, as Nell Gwyn, does a generally good job. Sir Cedric 
Hardwicke as the king, is suave and competent, while other roles, mostly 
secondary, are adequately filled. In production values, the picture stands 
up. In dialogue, it has a number of rough spots which become dubious 
in these days of church campaigning against the objectionable. 

By and large, "Nell Gwyn" is a commendable addition to the cycle 
started by Charles Laughton as Henry. Running time, 75 minutes. 

KANN 



a 



Para. Trustees Stay 
Under New Act 



(Continued from page 1) 
trustee. Arthur A. Ballantine of the 
firm of Root, Clark, Buckner & Bal- 
lantine told the court Richardson was 
willing to serve. 

Samuel Zirn, counsel for a group 
of bondholders, launched into a gen- 
eral criticism of Adolph Zukor, Ralph 
Kohn, Robert T. Swaine, Sir William 
Weisman, John D. Hertz, Frank Van- 
derlip and certain Chase National 
Bank officials who have had dealings 
with Paramount since the bankruptcy. 
Judge Coxe objected to a review by 
Zirn of statements made at previous 
hearings, but Zirn claimed that in de- 
ciding the issue, the court should treat 
the trustees as new names. 

Two minor stockholders also voiced 
objections to the trustees. 

Holds Trustees Qualified 

Alfred A. Cook, representing the 
stockholders' protective committee 
which claims to have 48 per cent of 
the outstanding stock on deposit, 
stated the work of the temporary 
trustees was satisfactory and he felt 
they were qualified to continue. He 
said they had efficiently performed 
their duties under guidance of able 
counsel. Cooke also said that within 
a short time his group will have more 
than 50 per cent of the outstanding 
stock. 

Nathan Burkan, representing mer- 
chandise creditors whose claims total 
$2,500,000, complimented the three 
trustees for their conscientious desire 
to safeguard the company which was 
on the rocks and is now emerging 
from its plight. He said: 

"We're not interested in following 
flimsy litigation. We know no three 
men better qualified for the posts and 
recommend their continuance, feeling 
secure that our interests will be pro- 
tected. 

"It would be an injustice to us to 
change the personnel at this time," he 
concluded. 

Further Boost for Trustees 

Malcolm Sumner, who represented 
bondholders whose holdings total $1.- 
500,000, declared he was in closer 
touch with the work of the trustees 
than any other counsel save for those 
representing trustees, dealing directly 
with them on important issues. He 
said : "This estate is extremelv for- 
tunate in having such men as Hides. 
Leake and Richardson and I believe 
they are the greatest protection to 
bondholders of the estate. 

"All creditors owe a deep debt of 
srratitude to these men who are will- 
ing- to serve," he stated. 

Before appointing the trustees to 
permanent posts, Coxe and Zirn in- 
dulged in some renartee which brought 
on a number of laughs. 

At one point in his objections, Zirn 
stated that Richardson would return 
to Fox Film after the bankruotcv. He 
added that Richardson would also re- 
turn to the nost he held in Chase 
National Bank. 

"The Bank may not be there," sug- 
gested Judere Coxe. 

To which Zirn replied : "You are 
verv naive about these things." 

At another point where Zirn wanted 
to imoress the jud^e about the tatter's 
knowledge of receiverships and bank- 
ruptcies, the court interrupted: "Yes, 



I also know about the receiverships 
you've been connected with." 

Zirn later brought out the point that 
at a previous hearing he had tried to 
submit papers and Judge Coxe had 
refused to admit them into the record. 

The judge answered : "I didn't have 
to look at the papers. I looked at 
you." 

Further on Zirn apologized for tak- 
ing up so much time of the court with 
his objections, to which Coxe re- 
plied : 

"You're not wasting my time. 
You're wasting your own." 

When Zirn brought out the alleged 
salarv of Zukor for 1929 amounting 
to $900,000, he said this was 100 times 
more than Coxe received a year. The 
iudge immediately corrected Zirn and 
said this was not so. 

After the hearing was declared 
closed Zirn persisted in an open dis- 
cussion with Judge Coxe on the merits 
of his obiections until the judge 
finally rushed into his chambers and 
signed the order making official the 
new appointments. 



Paramount Men Here 

Barney Balaban of Chicago, N. L. 
Nathanson of Toronto and Martin 
Mullin and Sam Pinanski of Boston, 
Paramount theatre partners all, are 
in New York. Their presence here 
at the same time is described as 
"routine." 

Charter Is Sought 
By Western States 

Oklahoma City, Tuly 10. — West- 
ern States Theatres Co. has filed ap- 
nlication for a charter. The charter 
was withheld by R. A. Sneed, secre- 
tary of state, until the original articles 
of incorporation for Lowenstein The- 
atres. Inc., are presented. The name 
is being changed to Western States. 

Sponsors of the new corporation re- 
mained in the background, with a city 
lawyer carrying on negotiations. The 
attorney said architects are at work 
on nlans for a theatre seating 3,000 to 
cost $1,000,000. 

Foster McSwain, former owner of 
Ada theatres, is head of the new or- 
I ganization. 



Fox Talent Resting 
For Summer Months 

Hollywood, July 10. — Fox talent 
will be scattered during the rest of 
the summer in spite of the fact six 
pictures are scheduled at Movietone 
City. 

Will Rogers is away. Winfield 
Sheehan and Janet Gaynor are sched- 
uled for European vacations ; Warner 
Baxter is on loan to Columbia for one 
picture and is slated for another at 
M-G-M; Frank Lloyd is at M-G-M 
to direct "Mutiny on the Bounty" ; 
James Dunn is on loan to M-G-M for 
"Have a Heart" ; John Boles is on 
loan to Radio for two pictures ; Spen- 
cer Tracy is slated for a six-week 
vacation ; Shirley Temple is at Ar- 
rowhead for six weeks ; Norman Fos- 
ter is in Tahiti ; Alice Faye is in the 
East, and Lilian Harvey and Charles 
Boyer, who were scheduled for one 
each this summer, are no longer with 
the company. 

In spite of the dearth of talent three 
Spanish picture, two Charlie Chans 
and one featuring Pat Paterson are 
scheduled. 



Radio, McCrea in Accord 

Hollywood, July 10. — Radio has 
withdrawn its suit against Joel Mc- 
Crea charging breach of contract. 
The actor, who was suspended for 
refusing to be loaned out to Univer- 
sal, has been re-signed to a new long 
termer under which his first film will 
be "The Richest Girl in the World." 
He will play opposite Miriam Hop- 
kins. 



Mannix, Selwyn Coming 

Hollywood, July 10. — E. J. Man- 
nix and Edgar Selwyn were on their 
way to New York by plane tonight, 
the former on a visit to his sick 
mother and the latter on business. 



Shea Unit Changes Name 

Dover, Del., July 10. — Shea Theatres 
Corp. has changed its name to Nyrie 
Theatres Corp., Erie, N. Y. 



Wednesday, July II, 1934 



Goldman Lines Up 
New Penn Circuit 



(Continued from page 1) 

first run outlet in Central City, Pa., 
but will not divulge the name of the 
theatre at this time. The only houses 
there not controlled by Stanley-War- 
ner are the Arcadia, a second run, and i 
the Fox Locust, held by Al Boyd and . 
Fox. Rumor indicated Goldman 
might be interested in the Mastbaum, . 
but this does not seem likely. 

The chain may start functioning ] 
Sept. 1 with about 25 houses. Gold- , 
man is now touring to line up sites, 
which will include theatres already 
established and building locations. 

A statement issued in behalf of the 
new enterprise declares that the com- 
pany is powerfully supported and 
strongly financed and has access to 
all major product, indicating a pos- 
sible treaty with Stanley-Warner, 
which controls first run major prod- 
uct, with the exception of Fox. 

Cleveland Dual End , 
Stirs No Complaint 

(Continued from page 1) 

virtually all Cleveland theatres. No 
complaints have been noted from any - 
source which buys tickets. 

Sunday was the first day under the 
new order. Business on that day was 
better than the average Sunday level 
at most houses. Exhibitors, however, 
attribute the increase more to cooler 
weather than the single bill policy. 

Monday's business at both circuit 
and outlying houses was generally 
better than that on duals the previous 
Monday. Exhibitors, who had antici- 
pated a decline, are delighted with 
the results of the single-feature pol- j 
icy. The better-than-average busi- 1 
ness on Sunday and Monday with sin- 
gles is taken as proof that when the 
public is picture-minded, the weather 
favorable and the show satisfactory, i 
it makes no difference whether two 
films or one is shown. 

Import Curb Lifted 
By Czechoslovakia 

(Continued from page 1) 

growing among exhibitors who found 
their revenue cut. Several compro- 
mises suggested to American distribu- 
tors have been rejected. 



No word of the removal of Czecho- 
Slovakian restrictions had been re- 
ceived yesterday at the Hays office, 
it was stated. 

STANDARD 
TEXTBOOKS 
on PROJECTION 

RICHARDSON'S 

(Three Volumes) 

Volumes 1 and 2 . . $ 6.20 i 

Volume 3 5.10 j 

Combination 10. 00 

NADELL'S $2.60 J 

QUIGLEY 
BOOKSHOP 

1790 Broadway New York 




Motior 
Picture 
Industry 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Alert, 
Intelligent 

Faithful; <'' 
Service to 
the industry 
in All 
Branches 



OL. 36. NO. 9 



NEW YORK, THURSDAY, JULY 12, 1934 



TEN CENTS 



PERMIT CANCELLATION OF 
FILM ON MORAL GROUNDS 



^ox Met. Deal 
Said Set At 
$4,500,000 



Warners and Loew's are understood 
have reached an agreement late 
st night to tip the bid for Fox 
etropolitan Playhouses from $4,000,- 
K) to $4,500,000. It is believed the 
;w bid will be made for the bonds 
id not leases. 

Counsel for Warners, Loew's and 
e Fox Met. bondholders' committee 
orked out details of the deal all yes- 
rday afternoon and until late last 
Ight. 

When the postponed hearing on the 

(Continued on page 7) 



tay Is Refused in 
Phila. Duals Suit 

Philadelphia, July 11. — U. S. Dis- 
ict Judge George A. W elsh today 

nied an application for a prelimi- 
!.ry injunction asked bv Harry Perel- 

an against major distributors in the 
' uble feature case started nearly a 
:Dnth ago. 

i In handing down the decision the 
•urt commented that the case in- 

lved so many ramifications and cov- 
ied so broad a territory that a pre- 
ininary injunction would be unfair to 
fc defendants. It was indicated that 

hearing with testimony would be 
: order in the fall. 



f. 5. Quiz May Part 
k. T. & T. from Films 

Washington, July 11. — Investiga- 
fn of the A. T. & T. by the new 
ideral Communications Commission 
y result in the company's divorc- 
; itself from all film connections, it 
s indicated today as the commis- 
]n organized for operation. 
-t was indicated that the investiga- 
n would begin almost immediately 

(Continued on page 7) 



nti-Sherman Move 
Is Called "Illegal 

Attempts to oust Harry Sherman, 
sident, and certain other officials of 
:al 306 are described by members 

(Continued on page 7) 



Statement Outlining Plan 
To Extend Cancellations 



Official text of the Hays statement extending cancellation priv- 
ileges to pictures objected to publicly on moral grounds follows: 

" Amplifying Will H. Hays' statement of two weeks ago, which con- 
cerned the action taken to amend and strengthen the system of indus- 
try self-regulation established by the M. P. Producers and Distributors 
of America, the following companies, members of that association, an- 
nounced yesterday that each would grant to exhibitors the right to omit 
the exhibition of any of their motion pictures released prior to July 15, 
1934, against which there is a genuine protest on moral grounds: 

"Columbia Pictures Corp. 

"Educational Film Exchanges, Inc. 

"First National Pictures, Inc. 

(Continued on page 6) 



Zoning Delay 
Holds Up New 
Season Sales 



With only 10 of the 31 clearance 
and zoning boards filing new sched- 
ules by July 1, distributors are at a 
loss at what to do about selling new 
season's product, contending they can- 
not go ahead with deals until new 
schedules are set up for 1934-35. 

Campi today will take some kind of 
action on the new schedules and it is 
possible a recommendation may be 
made for an extension of the July 1 
deadline. 

Local boards throughout the coun- 
try refuse to hear or file schedules be- 

(Continued on page 7) 



Assessment Changes 
Under Campi Study 

Changes in allocation of exhibitor 
assessments for the second half of 
1934 were discussed yesterday by the 
code finance committee, comprising 
Nathan Yamins, Harold S. Bareford 
and W. C. Michel. The problem is 
now being studied and worked out and 
a plan will be presented to Campi for 
approval shortly. 

The first half year's assessment 

(Continued on page 7) 



New Theatres 
Are Begun in 
Many Places 



Almost imperceptible in its mark- 
ings, but evident, nevertheless, is a 
revival of theatre construction in scat- 
tered sections of the nation. 

Long dormant, plans to build new 
houses where they are felt to be 
needed or to embark on a replacement 
campaign where existing theatres are 
outmoded developed in a number of 
cities and towns yesterday. 

One sales manager expressed the 
reaction of all yesterday when, ad- 
vised of the facts, he said : 

"There couldn't be any more definite 

(Continued on page 7) 



Bernhard Silent on 
Closings in Phila, 

Joseph Bernhard, general manager 
of Warner Theatres, yesterday re- 
fused to discuss reports from Phila- 
delphia that the announced plan of 
closing his circuit's theatres there un- 
less the church boycott was lifted was 
to be abandoned. 

"The statement I made on July 6 is 
the last statement I wrote on the 
matter," he said. "I do not propose 
making another one." 



Majors Voluntarily 
Agree— Code Clause 
Applies First 

Pictures to which a "genuine 
protest" has been made on moral 
grounds and released prior to July 
15, when the reinforced Production 
Code Administration goes into op- 
eration, may be cancelled by exhibi- 
tors without obligation for their 
contracted rental. 

Ten major companies, all mem- 
bers of the Hays organization, yes- 
terday voluntarily united on this 
plan as a further indication to pro- 
testing church organizations that 
their intention of eliminating out- 
side criticisms of objectionable pic- 
tures was no empty gesture. 

The sweeping cancellation privi- 
lege was determined upon by Co- 
lumbia, Educational, First Na- 
tional, Fox, M-G-M, Paramount. 
RKO, United Artists, Universal and 
Warners, but provides that the 10 per 
cent cancellation clause in the NRA 
code is to prevail first. 

The code clause authorizes cancella- 
tions at the rate of one in every group 
of 10 where contracted rentals aver- 
age $250 or less per picture in situa- 
tions where the exhibitor has bought 
all product offered him and where he 
not only has signed the code assent 
form and paid his assessment but 
where he has observed to the full the 

(Continued on page 6) 



Mundus Raises Its 
First Group to 27 

Mundus Distributing Corp., newly 
formed unit for distribution of foreign 
pictures in association with United 
Artists, has increased its first list to 
27, according to Earl W. Kramer, 
general manager. Releases start Julv 
23. 

It is understood all the films are 
English, many of them by British & 
Dominions. Among the producers and 
directors represented are Alexander 
Korda, Herbert Wilcox, and Rowland 
V. Lee. 

In the list are : 

"Cash," starring Robert Donat; "Blue 
Danube," with Joseph Schildkraut; "Men of 
Tomorrow," with Donat and Merle Oberon.; 
"The Private Life of Don Juan." with 
Douglas Fairbanks; "Night of the Garter," 
with Sydney Howard and Winifred Shotter; 
(Continued on page 7) 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Thursday, July 12, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



(Registered U. S. Patent Office) 



Vol. 36 



July 12, 1934 



No. 9 



Martin Quigley 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 
MAURICE KANN 

Editor 
JAMES A. CRON 
Advertising Manager 



Published daily except Sunday and holi- 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub- 
sidiary of Quigley Publications, Inc., 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 1790 Broadway, New 
York. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Cable ad- 
dress "Quigpubco, New York." All con- 
tents copyrighted 1934 by Motion Picture 
Daily, Inc. Address all correspondence to 
the New York Office. Other Quigley pub- 
lications: MOTION PICTURE HERALD, 
BETTER THEATRES, THE MOTION 
PICTURE ALMANAC and THE CHI- 
CAGOAN. 

Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Life 
Building, Vine and Yucca Streets, Victor 
M. Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 407 
South Dearborn Street, Edwin S. Clif- 
ford, manager; London Bureau: Remo 
House, 310 Regent St., London, W. 1, 
Bruce Allan, Representative. Cable address: 
"Quigpubco, • London"; Berlin Bureau: 
Berlin - Tempelhof , Kaiserin - Augustastrasse 
28, Joachim K. Rutenberg, Representative; 
Paris Bureau: 19, Rue de la Cour des- 
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Bureau: Viale Gorizia, Vittorio Malpassuti, 
Representative; Sydney Bureau: 102 Sus- 
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ico City Bureau: Apartado 269, James 
Lockhart, Representative; Glasgow Bureau: 
86 Dundrennan Road, G. Holmes, Repre- 
sentative; Budapest Bureau: 11 Olasz 
Fasor 17. Endre Hevesi, Representative. 

Entered as second class matter January 
4, 1926 at the Post Office at New York 
City, N. Y., under Act of March 3, 1379. 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada $15 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 



Cohn, S ping old Fly 
West from Chicago 

Chicago, July 11. — Jack Cohn and 
Nate Spingold caught the 3 o'clock 
plane this morning for the coast fol- 
lowing last night's banquet at the 
French Casino which highlighted the 
Columbia convention here. 

Group meetings were held this after- 
noon. 

Abe Montague, general sales man- 
ager, was presented a testimonial 
scroll in appreciation of his leader- 
ship. It was signed by branch man- 
agers and salesmen. 



State Righting "Revolt" 

Mentone is state righting "The 
World in Revolt," its first feature, and 
already has sold five territories. Phil 
Meyer of General Pictures Exchange 
has purchased Greater New York ; 
A. G. Spencer of Chicago, Northern 
Illinois and Wisconsin; Major Film 
Co., Seattle, Oregon, Washington, 
Montana and Northern Idaho ; West 
Coast Booking Office, Los Angeles, 
Arizona, Nevada, California and Ha- 
waii ; William Brumberg, Ohio and 
Kentucky. 



Mochrie to Aid Smith 

Robert Mochrie, Warner branch 
manager in Philadelphia, has been 
made assistant to A. W. Smith, Jr., in 
charge of eastern and Canadian dis- 
tribution. He will be succeeded at 
Philadelphia by William Mausell, 
member of the sales staff. The change 
will be effective Monday. 



Insid ers' Outlook 

U* URTHER underwriting their made in good faith. Where the 
own promise of removing latter question becomes involved 
the objectionable elements in or subject to interpretation by 
their product, the backbone com- either exhibitor or distributor, 
panies of the industry yesterday the machinery provides adjudica- 
went beyond original measures tion is to be thrown to the local 
in granting to exhibitors, one and grievance board under the NRA 
all, the privilege of canceling code. As an additional safeguard 
out pictures where public protest, against chiseling exhibitors, it is 
made in good faith, has been provided that the moral ground 
raised against them. This step, issue is to be one which has de- 
covering releases prior to July veloped at the hub of his own 
15, when the bulwarked Produc- operations. Thus, an exhibitor in 
tion Code Administration will the Bronx cannot exercise the 
make product released thereafter right now extended to him be- 
behave with more decorum, is cause a bona fide objection 
one of the most significant in re- against a specific picture has been 
cent industry history, a forth- voiced in Brooklyn. Or in Man- 
right evidence that direct action hattan. Or in Staten Island or in 
is to prevail. . . . Queens. . . . 

▼ T 

There are some governing re- It is essential to avoid misun- 
strictions. Naturally, there must derstandings and a beclouding of 
be if the entire business of dis- the situation to again point out 
tribution is to avoid being that the government code cancel- 
thrown out of kilter. The new can- lation clause is to prevail. It must 
cellation privilege goes for code be exhausted first. It is essential 
signers and those who have not to repeat that there is no numeri- 
signed the government code. It cal limitation under the new can- 
provides that the 10 per cent can- cellation setup once the govern- 
cellation clause under the NRA ment code clause has been 
document is first to be exhausted. observed. Producers and dis- 
It does not provide that cancella- tributors, beyond all question in 
tions have to stop when exhibitor deadly earnest in their endeavors 
prerogatives under that clause to meet a worrisome situation, 
have been exhausted. If a the- national in scope, yesterday went 
atreman is entitled to a four-pic- further than ever they have be- 
ture cancellation under the code fore. The dirty picture situation 
and has applied this to some or — exaggerated maybe, but no 
none, pictures rejected on moral phantom certainly — is well on its 
grounds first apply to the four. way out of the running. . . . 
If his quartet has run out, he gets ▼ 
the cancellation anyway, but must Complications in the Loew- 
play a replacement supplied by Warner bid for Fox Met, up in 
the distributor. Thus, conceiv- Federal Court this afternoon, 
ably, any exhibitor may reject as were reported last night. Ru- 
many pictures as have been sub- mored was a new- counter bid of 
ject of protest locally on moral $5,000,000 by John Dillon, of 
grounds. . . . Hayden, Stone and Co., re- 

▼ putedly carrying with it as a 
What he may adjudge objec- "must" a condition that the houses 

tionable w-ill carry no weight. involved must franchise for Fox 

The objections must have been product. This would indicate Sid 

voiced in his city or town by a Kent has galvanized himself into 

church or civic group. Moreover, action and made necessary a raised 

the objections must have been ante on the part of Messrs. 

Trading Light on Big Board 

Net 

High Low Close Change Sales 

Consolidated Film Industries 3 3 3 100 

Eastman Kodak 9954 9754 9754 — 54 700 

Fox Film "A" 1246 1246 1246 — H 200 

Loew's, Inc 27% 27% Z7'A + 54 4.400 

Paramount Publix 1% 3ti 3tt — 54 200 

Pathe Exchange 256 \% VA — 54 4,900 

Pathe Exchange "A" 2054 1954 — % 300 

RKO : 246 246 246 +56 100 

Warner Bros 5 4% 5 + 56 1,200 

Technicolor Continues Rise on Curb 

Net 

High Low Close Change Sales 

Technicolor 1354 13 1354 + H 200 

Paramount Broadway Bonds Off 2Y 2 

Net 

High Low Close Change Sales 

General Theatre Equipment 6s '40 754 756 756 — 36 

Loew's 6s '41, ww deb rights 101 10154 101 + 54 4 

Paramount Broadway 554s '51 38% 3SV S 3SV S —254 4 

Paramount F. L. 6s '47 49 49 49 5 

Paramount Publix 554s '50 4954 48% 48% + H 2 

Pathe 7s '37, ww 9954 9954 9954 — 54 1 

Warner Bros. 6s '39, wd 5444 5454 5454 + 54 6 



Schenck and Warner. Intriguing, 
as well, is a plan held closely at 
RKO. It's interesting. . . . 
▼ 

There, deals are reported hang- 
ing for about 18 or 19 theatres, 
each one of them in the dead 
center of zones which would be 
Loew-dominant if that circuit's 
offer is accepted. Now subse- 
quent run houses, the dope is 
Loew would keep its potential 
acquisitions as they are, with few 
exceptions, in order to keep the 
original Loew theatres first run 
in their neighborhoods, as they 
now are. The RKO scheme, it 
is said for it, contemplates mak- 
ing each one of its proposed 18 
or 19 additions first run, there- 
by giving the Loew annexations 
plenty of hell. How and why 
first run, you could ask ? Merely 
because the theatre spots lined 
up, generally speaking, are in 
zones where RKO does not 
operate now. Pretty picture and 
potentially a lot of gory fun. . . . 

KANN 



Two More Regionals 
To Be Held by Ross 

Two more conventions are to be 
held by Ross Federal Service, Inc., 
under a new three-district plan worked 
out prior to the New York meet last 
week. 

The next one will be held in Chi- 
cago July 25 and will be attended by 
Walter I. Brown, Chicago district 
manager, and the following branch 
managers : Ralph W. Thayer, Cincin- 
nati ; Bert Jolley, Indianapolis ; How- 
ard Donaldson, Detroit ; Charles Wag- 
ner, Milwaukee; Harry Schiffrin, Des 
Moines ; Henry Gleiss, Omaha ; Paul 
A. La Roche, Kansas City, and 
Dwight Mills, St Louis. 

After the Chicago meet Harry A. 
Ross, president, and D. A. Ross, vice- 
president and manager of branch op- 
erations, will leave for the coast to 
hold further sessions there. 



Southern Indies to 
Fight Big Circuits 

Atlanta, July 11. — One of the pro- 
jects decided upon before the close of 
the two-day convention of the G. F. 
T. A. Independent Theatre Owners' 
Ass'n. w T as the raising of a fund to 
fight invasion of circuits in this terri- 
tory. Details of how T this is to be ac- 
complished were not divulged. Another 
convention is to be held here Aug. 8. 



Universal Completes Two 

Hollywood, July 11. — Universal 
yesterday completed "Romance in the 
Rain," with Roger Pryor and Heather 
Angel and "Million Dollar Ransom,"! 
written by Damon Runyon and star-] 
ring Philip Holmes. 



Close Deal on "Ra-Mu" \ 

H. H. Rogers, Jr., has closed a deal 
with Capt. E. A. Salisbury for world 
distribution of his latest adventure 
picture, "Ra-Mu," which was made 
in the Marquesas and Samoan Islands.] 



Plan Jewish Benefit 

Nathan Burkan yesterday headed 
a group of Jewish interests which 
met at the M. P. Club to discuss a 

benefit to be held Sept. 5. 



HOT WEATHER 




/ 




cked COLD! 




Very pleasant to note that pictures like "The Thin Man" 
"Operator 13" "Viva Villa!" "Sadie McKee" "Manhattan 
Melodrama" "Men in White" etc. ... are being followed 
by two of the BIGGEST HITS EVER RELEASED in 
MID-SUMMER! 



EXTRA! PREVIEW! 

Hollywood Reporter says: 
••BORN TO BE KISSED' is 
bright and filled with 
laughs. Grand entertainment. 
Harlow at her best. Simply 
swell in addition to being 
luscious eyefull!" 






JEAN HARLOW 
'BORN TO BE KISSED 

with LIONEL BARRYMORE 
FRANC HOT TONE 

LEWIS STONE • Jack Conway, Director 
Produced by Bernard Hyman 



WALLACE BEERY 



"TREASURE ISLAND 

with LIONEL BARRYMORE 

LEWIS STONE • Otto Kruger • Directed by 
Victor Fleming • Produced by Hunt Stromberg 



I 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Thursday, July 12, 1934 



Block Booking 
Not at Fault, 

Asserts Mayer 



Reformers' zeal is misdirected in at- 
tacking block booking; it should be 
concentrated on support of good pic- 
tures, declares Arthur L. Mayer in 
the current issue of Liberty. 
Here's the way he puts it: 
"I believe that there is no exhibi- 
tor who does not greatly desire to be 
numbered among the socially useful 
members of his community and who 
does not thrill with pride when his 
pictures receive critical approbation 
for their artistic or educational 
merits. 

"Indeed I think that most exhibi- 
tors would make heavy personal sac- 
rifices to forego showing shabby, 
meretricious, or salacious pictures. 
The reason they do not do so is un- 
related to any trade practices ; it is 
because the public has thus far been 
completely indifferent to pictures 
which failed to conform to the ac- 
cepted canons of public entertainment. 

"If the reformers' zeal, instead of 
being wasted on false clues, could be 
thrown into campaigns for the sup- 
port of meritorious and unusual pic- 
tures so that it would prove even 
moderately profitable to exhibit them, 
the problem of block booking would 
rapidly sink into insignificance." 

Mayer writes as an exhibitor. He 
is operator of the Rialto and former 
advertising director of Paramount. 

Can't See All Films 

With more than 25,000 miles of film 
in circulation daily, he points out, 
playing in 15,000 or more theatres and 
being distributed from 32 key cities, 
exhibitors from outlying districts 
would have to spend most of their 
time at exchanges looking at film if 
they were to buy each feature and 
each short on its individual merits. 
Some exhibitors play 200 or more pic- 
tures a year, he points out. 

"Actually block booking is the only 
protection which most small exhibi- 
tors have from being deprived of the 
first run of any desirable product," 
he writes. 

Discussing cancellations, he points 
out that the bulk of rejections are on 
the so-called high class features. In 
the St. Louis territory, he says, War- 
ners secured only 149 play dates out 
of 230 contracts on "Alexander Ham- 
ilton" ; no dates at all could be se- 
cured at first on "Disraeli." On the 
other hand, "Scarface" played all its 
contracts. 

"In the Salt Lake City territory," he 
goes on, "the only way exhibitors can 
be compelled to play Alice in Won- 
derland' is by refusing to give them 
Mae West pictures until they do. On 
'Old Ironsides' price adjustments were 
demanded and given in approximately 
15 per cent of the contracts in order 
to get play dates. 

"This compares rather dismally with 
'Little Caesar,' which was played by 
every large exhibitor in the terri- 
tory. 

"The Pittsburgh exchange did not 
receive a single cancellation on 'Pub- 
lic Enemy,' 'I'm No Angel,' or 'So 
This Is Africa' ; but 'Berkeley Square' 
was cancelled by 15 per cent of the 
exhibitors and 'Voltaire' by 25 per 
cent. 'Cavalcade' was cancelled by 
the majority of small towns, and 



Statement Outlining Plan 
To Extend Cancellations 



(Continued from page 1) 

"Fox Film Corp. 

"Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Distributing Corp. 
"Paramount Pictures Distributing Corp. 
"RKO Distributing Corp. 
"United Artists Corp. 
"Universal Pictures Corp. 
"Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. 

"This means that in any community in which there is genuine con- 
certed objection to the showing of a particular picture on moral grounds 
an exhibitor who has contracted to exhibit that picture will be given 
the right to omit its exhibition without obligation for its rental. 

"The reason for the limitation of this cancellation privilege to pic- 
tures generally released prior to July 15 is because that is the date upon 
which the new regulatory provisions go into effect. After that date the 
association's Production Code Administration will function with in- 
creased authority and the board of directors of the association will 
assume final responsibility for all future motion pictures distributed 
by members of the association. 

"To identify all films bearing the approval of the association's Production 
Code Administration, a distinctive seal has been adopted and will be shown 
on the screen directly after the main title of all pictures. The seal, which 
every picture released after July 15 by members of the association will 
bear, will be evidence of the industry's pledge that every precaution has 
been taken to insure compliance with the production code of the M. P. 
Producers and Distributors of America." 



larger cities insisted on a reduction in 

price." 

"The demand for risque, gangster, 
or wild youth pictures exceeds that 
for artistic, educational, or classical 
productions," he goes on. " 'Little Wo- 
men,' with the glamorous new star 
Hepburn, has scored a sensational 
success, and in the larger cities 
'Henry VIII' has done exceedingly 
well. These exceptions, however, 
only emphasize what every exhibitor 
has learned to his cost. The so-called 
'best element' in the community can- 
not be relied upon to support in large 
numbers the type of picture which they 
claim to have favor." 



Local Church Moves 
Halted for Cardinal 

There was a respite yesterday in 
the war on objectionable films. The 
Legion of Decency is awaiting publi- 
cation of a statement on the picture 
situation by Cardinal Hayes in the 
Catholic News here tomorrow. 

It will not proceed with the fight 
until it learns how the prelate feels 
about the question, with its future 
moves governed by suggestions that 
may be made in the statement. 

Tomorrow the Federal Council of 
Churches of Christ in America 'will 
hold a meeting at its headquarters 
here to discuss further details of its 
campaign. 



Federation Eyeing Drive 

The Federation of the M. P. In- 
dustry is awaiting developments of 
the Catholic situation before it makes 
any new moves, Harry Thomas, pres- 
ident, stated yesterday. 



Coast Conference Held 

Hollywood, July 11. — Studio heads 
conferred with Will H. Hays and 
Joseph I. Breen today on the church 
film drive. 



Five Appeals Heard 
By Campi Committee 

Five appeals were heard yesterday 
by Campi's special code committee, 
consisting of Harry K. Hecht, Ed 
McEvoy and Nathan Yamins. They 
are : 

Westmont, Westmont, 111., against 
the Tivoli, Downers Grove, 111., on 
clearance and zoning. 

P. C. Osteen, Carolina, Anderson, 
S. C, against Strand, same city, on 
overbuying. 

E. B. McCurdy, Columbia, Balti- 
more, against Leon Zeller, Roy, same 
city, on reduced admissions. 

Philip Sliman, Evangeline, New 
Iberia, La., against Palace, same city, 
on overbuying. 

Lewis Isenberg, New Ariel, Buffalo, 
against E. Wick, Majestic, same city, 
on reduced admissions. 

Most of Campi's time today will 
be spent hearing recommendations of 
appeal committees on 10 cases. De- 
cisions will be handed down and 
opinions will be rendered by the legal 
committee. In addition, the legal com- 
mittee will have ready for Campi ap- 
proval recommendations on 13 appeals 
already heard by Campi at previous 
sessions. 



Cincy Grievances Clear 

Cincinnati, July 11. — The griev- 
ance board now has disposed of all 
cases on the docket. No further meet- 
ings will be held until and unless ad- 
ditional cases are filed. 



Dinner for Lewen Pizor 

Philadelphia, July 11. — A testi- 
monial dinner by the M. P. T. O. of 
Eastern Pennsylvania, Southern New 
Jersey and Delaware, of which 
Charles Segall is president, will be 
tendered to the retiring president, Lew- 
en Pizor, on Monday evening at the 
Bellevue Stratford. Three hundred 
guests are expected. 



Film May Be 
Cancelled on 
Moral Basis 



(Continued from page 1) 

stipulations under his contract for 
service. 

The voluntary action which devel- 
oped yesterday will reduce cancella- 
tions allowable under the code where 
the exhibitor, entitled to them, has not 
previously exercised his right. In the 
event, however, that an exhibitor has 
already consumed all rejections per- 
mitted under the government code, he 
will now be permitted to carry cancel- 
lations further under the new offer. 

"This means," declared the official 
Hays office statement, "that in any 
community in which there is genuine 
concerted objection to the showing of 
a particular picture on moral grounds 
an exhibitor who has contracted to 
exhibit that picture will be given the 
right to omjt its exhibition without 
obligation for its rental." 

Must Chose Another Film 

By "genuine concerted action" is 
meant not personal objections to a 
given film on the part of an exhibitor, 
but publicly expressed local objections 
from a church or civic group. It is 
understood that in those instances 
where a picture is elected for cancella- 
tion by the exhibitor, the distributor is 
to have full privilege of insisting that 
the exhibitor accept another feature by 
way of replacement. 

In the event the good faith of a 
particular case in point is involved, it 
is further understood the exhibitor and 
the distributor are to submit the de- 
cision to their local grievance board 
under the NRA code. 

The purpose of limiting the offer 
to releases prior to July 15 ties in 
with the strengthened Production 
Code Administration which becomes 
effective Saturday midnight. After 
that date, the further entrenched ma- 
chinery under Joseph I. Breen, Pro- 
duction Code Administrator, will be- 
come operative. Appeals no longer 
then will be heard in Hollywood, but 
transferred to New York where the 
board of directors of the Hays organ- 
ization will be the final judges. 

Unannounced but part of the new i 
system, nevertheless, is a system of 
cash fines for violations. These will 
be applied to the offending distributor 
and are to be $25,000 for each infrac 
tion of the production code. 



Mary Pickford to Be 
Honor Guest at Fair 



Hollywood, July 11. — Mary Pick- 
ford will leave here in time to reach 
Chicago on Saturday morning to b 
the guest of the World's Fair manage 
ment. It will be known as "Mary 
Pickford Day." 

From Chicago she will go to New 
York to close a deal for publication 
of her series of writings on Holly 
wood. 



Flash Review 

Elmer and Elsie — . . . For neigh- 
borhoods . . . this will go nicely as 2 
programmer. . . . 

This Him will be reviewed in full in (■ 
later issue of Motion Picture Daily. 



fhursday, July 12, 1934 



MO HON PICTURE 

DAILY 



Fox Met. Deal 
Said Set At 
$4,500,000 



(Continued from page 1) 

oreclosure sale is held before Feder- 
.1 Judge Julian W. Alack this after- 
loon, counsel for Randforce and 
;kouras will ask the court for ac- 
ion one way or another. The inde- 
>endent operators claim that the 
norale of the circuits has been broken 
lown to the point where managers 
re neglecting their jobs. 
Although John H. Amen, special as- 
istant to Attorney General Homer 
5. Cummings, is expected to be on the 
cene again today for the Department 
>i Justice, the NRA has taken a sud- 
den interest in the deal and is under- 
tood looking over all angles for pos- 
ible code violations. Division Ad- 
ministrator Sol A. Rosenblatt is keep- 
rig in close touch with the proceed- 
ngs. 

Loewites yesterday denied offers had 
een made to Sam Rinzler and Louis 
Visch to operate their present hold- 
lgs under a Loew management deal 
: and when the court approves the 
;id. The same denial holds for 
ieorge P. Skouras, who was said to 
e in line for the Long Island units. 

However, both the Randforce and 
•kouras operators have groups of the- 
tres not involved and will continue 
i the local picture notwithstanding 
ie decision of Judge Mack. 

On July 6, Motion Picture Daily 
eported that a new bid of $4,500,- 
00 would be made by Loew's and 
Varners, but this was promptly de- 
aed. 

Wundus Raises Its 
First Group to 27 

(Continued from page 1) 

Over-Night." starring Donat; "Venetian 

ight."' Schildkraut and Brigette Helm; 

That's a Good Girl." Jack Buchanan; 

Wolves." Charles Laughton and Dorothy 
iish; "Girl from Maxim's," Frances Dayj 

Chance of a Night Time." Ralph Lynn 
:id Miss Shotter; "Almost a Divorce," 

oward and Xelson Keys; "Counsel's Opin- 
|m." Binnie Barnes and Cyril Maude; 
(Plunder," Tom Walls and Lynn; "General 
!:>hn Regan," Henry Edwards; "Wedding 

ehearsal." Roland Young and Oberon; 

The Love Contract," Owen Nares and 

'.iss Shotter; "A Night Like This," Walls 

id Lynn; "It's a King," Howard; "The 
jing's Cup," Dorothy Bouchier and Milton; 
(Mischief." Lynn and Miss Shotter; "Betty 
May fair," Bushell and Miss Shotter; 
I5ay It With Music." Percy Marmont and 

ick Payne and band; "Leap Year," Walls; 

The Ghost Walkers." Walls and Lynn; 

The Trouble Cruise." Howard; "Girls 

lease," Howard and Jane Baxter, and 

The Blarney Stone," Walls. 
Physical distribution will be handled 
lirough United Artists, but a separate 

lies staff has been at work since 
!jly 9. 



N'Orleans Is Agitated 



fundus, Gaumont 
Not Connected — Lee 

Mundus Distributing Corp., the 

fewly formed unit which will handle 
ritish pictures in this country in as- 
>ciation with United Artists, will 

■ave no connection with Gaumont 
ritish, according to Arthur A. Lee, 
ce-president of Gaumont British 

. icture Corp. of America. 

; Lee says his company is now con- 
:ntrating on 12 features called "The 
elect Twelve" which are separate 
•om the company's 1934-35 list and 
-e being screened in advance of sale. 



New Orleans, July 11. — This fair home of the Sazerac, suh, is 
worried about its reputation. More, it's agitated. 

Somebody suggested that calling Mae West's new opus "Belle 
of New Orleans" would — er — ah — would convey the wrong impres- 
sion. The suggestion swelled into a chorus, and now everybody 
except Huey Long is talking — or telegramming. 

First it was the Association of Commerce, then it was the 
Kiwanis Club, now it's the Federation of Women's Clubs and the 
Better Films Council. Mayor T. Semmes Walmsley has joined 
those who are sending telegrams to Will H. Hays. 

J. K. Byrne had the Kiwanis Club pass a resolution saying the 
title would give a "false impression" of New Orleans. Frank 
Martin of Kiwanis objected and said the title would be good adver- 
tising for the city and would bring tourists to a liberal city with- 
out blue laws, but he was greeted with raised eyebrows and just 
a trace of pained surprise. 

Mrs. Isabel Giefers, president of the women's federation; Mrs. 
A. S. Tucker, president of the Better Films Council, and Mrs. Bet- 
tina Gunczy, secretary of the National Board of Review, were 
among those who wired Hays. 

It's the biggest disturbance since the last time the levee broke 
and flooded St. Louis and Basin Streets. 



New Theatres Are 
Begun Many Places 

(Continued from page 1) 
or encouraging indication of return- 
ing good times." 

Here is what reached Motion Pic- 
ture Daily yesterday : 



Detroit, July 11. — Several new 
Michigan theatres are planned. 

A. C. Early, Kalamazoo showman, 
plans a new house in Coldvvater, 
Mich., and new houses will also be 
erected in St. Joseph and Sturgis. 

Howard Lane has opened his new 
Alhambra in Hillsdale, a Butterfield 
stronghold. 



Cincinnati, July 11. — A new thea- 
tre, the first to be erected in this sec- 
tion for the past three or four years, 
is nearing completion at Lockland, a 
suburb, under direction of William and 
Sallee Bennett. The house, which will 
be called the Dunbar, will cater to 
colored patronage. 



Charlotte, July 11. — H. F. Kincey 
is reported heading a concern which 
will build a new theatre on the site 
of the Imperial, which was destroyed 
by fire in December, 1930. It is un- 
derstood the new house will cost $50,- 
000. 



New Philadelphia, O., July 11. — 
First new theatre construction re- 
ported in this area within the past 
five years will be a house on East 
High St. Paramount Theatres, Inc., 
will build it. 



Anti-Sherman Move 
Is Called "Illegal 

(Continued from page 1) 

of the organization as "illegal and 
without effect." 

A group, described as "insurgents," 
last night met at Yorkville Casino to 
decide on moves. 

Since the session was not called by 
the local itself, no cognizance will be 
given to the resolutions or other rec- 
ommendations decided upon. 



Pat Casey West Soon 

Pat Casey, a member of the code 
studio labor committee, expects to 
leave for the coast shortly. He has 
been here several weeks and has just 
recovered from a slight illness. 



U. S. Quiz May Part 
A.T.&T. from Films 

(Continued from page 1) 

in order that the report may be ready 
for submission to Congress by Feb. 
1 next. While members of the com- 
mission did not intimate the line of 
examination that would be followed 
outside of the study of telephone and 
telegraph rates, it will be remembered 
that Senator Dill of Washington 
sought a full probe of the company's 
activities. 



Zoning Delay 
Holds Up New 
Season Sales 



(Continued from page 1) 

ing filed now in accordance with a 
letter sent out by Campi on May 25 
giving exhibitors until July 1 to file. 

As yet no schedule has been filed 
for New York, although hearings 
have been held on Long Island zon- 
ing and appealed. The Manhattan 
board has yet to decide on a schedule 
for the territory from 59th Street to 
110th Street, from Central Park West 
to the Hudson River. 



Philadelphia, July 11. — Until new 
procedure can be obtained from New 
York, the local clearance and zoning 
board will not hear any more cases of 
this nature. The board has been hav- 
ing trouble with definition and desig- 
nation of first run theatres in various 
neighborhoods. 



Assessment Changes 
Under Campi Study 

(Continued from page 1) 

ended July 1, but since Campi has 
sufficient funds on hand it is in no 
hurry to send out new bills. All of 
the first six months' assessments are 
not yet on hand and with the assent 
deadline being extended to Aug. 15, 
hundreds of exhibitors are expected 
to send in additional levies. 



One of you reporter/ 
/ee i f he i/ at the S: 
MAYFLOWER^t/ 




V 
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*E DO OUI ftUT 



Single Rooms from $4 
Double Rooms from $6 




Seasoned observers know where 
to locate visitors from all over the 
world whose names mean news 

Air-Cooled Restaurants — 1000 Beautifully 
and Comfortably Furnished Rooms, All with 
Bath, Circulating Ice Water, Oscillating Fans 

Washington's Finest Hotel 
Mr. R. L. Pollio. Manager 



V 
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. i" 




w 





Introducing JOE MOREISOK 

The really great thing that the 
picture accomplishes is to bring 
JOE MORBISON to the screen 
. . . this should prove a boon to 
the exhibitor and public." 

— Hollyrood Reporter 



YOU DASTARD! 

Get thee hence, lest I 
smite thee on thy 
puss! Baby LeRoy and 
W. C. Fields engage in 
mortal coirrbat. 



A Paramount Picture with W..C. FIELDS and BABY LeEOY 



JOE MORRISON • JUDITH ALLEN • JACK MULHALL 



directed by William Beaudine 



The Leading 

Newspaper^, 
of the 
Motional 
Picture 
Industry 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Alert, 

Intelligent 

and 

faithful 
Service to 
the Industry 
in All 
Branches 



"OL. 36. NO. 10 



NEW YORK, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 1934 



TEN CENTS 



Fixes July 20 
Deadline for 
Fox Met. Deal 



lourt Grants New and 
Final Delay 



Federal Judge Julian W. Mack yes- 
^rday gave counsel for the Fox Metr- 
opolitan bondholders' committee and 
ittorneys for Loew's and Warners 
leir last adjournment to iron out all 
f their difficulties, allowing them un- 
1 July 20 to present a final bid for 
le 87 houses. 

The former bid of $4,000,000 was 
ipped $500,000 yesterday and it is 
ow a question of how the money 
hould be applied over various prop- 
irties that make up the group. If 
jny of the theatres now included in 
ae circuit are not delivered they are 
ot to be included in the purchase 
{rice, it was stated. Another point 
l question involves contracts w : hich 
(Continued on page 12) 

Fabian Gets Fox in 
Brooklyn on July 26 

Having leased the Fox, Brooklyn, 
•om the trustees, Simon Fabian takes 
le house July 26, when it will be 
osed until Sept. 1. Sydney Cohen, 
^presenting the trustees in the deal, 
-ill continue to act for them in an 
dvisory capacity after Fabian oper- 
tes. 

Fabian yesterday stated he had not 
ecided on the new policy and also 
iiat he was not negotiating for any 
ther theatres at this time. 



? WC Appraisal Holds 
Up Foreclosure Sale 

Los Angeles, July 12. — Appraisal 
f assets of Fox West Coast proper- 
es is now under way and not likely 
) be completed until early next 
'ionth. Until this is finished, no bid 
an be arrived at by F.W.C. for sub- 
lission at the foreclosure sale, tenta- 
vely slated for the end of the month, 
ut which may not be held until late in 
.ugust. 



Deal Falls Through 

Although the deal was prac- 
tically set, Warners and Rapf 
& Rudin have called off 
further negotiations for 
three of the latter's houses 
in New Jersey. R. & R. take 
the Warners' Royal in Bloom- 
field on Sept. 1. 



Producers Clear Decks; 
Ready for a New Deal 



No Check on "Legitimate 
Pleasure, "Says Cardinal 



Declaring "very notable progress" 
has been made by the Catholic 
Bishops' Committee in the campaign 
against objectionable pictures, Patrick 
Cardinal Hayes yesterday issued a pas- 
toral letter in which he made it clear 
the Catholic Church does not contem- 
plate "reform, restriction or suppres- 
sion that would deprive the people of 
legitimate pleasure." 

"What is to be condemned as repre- 
hensible," continued the text, "is the 
glorification of crime, lust, and, in 
general the serious violation of the 
law of God and man in things sacred 
to home and society." 

The pastoral letter is to be read 
from Catholic pulpits throughout the 



Hunt Still On 

Hollywood, July 12. — Para- 
mount is still facing the title 
bugaboo on the Mae West 
film, having been unable to 
clear "Belle of New Orleans," 
which happens to have been 
tacked on to a play of a de- 
cade ago. 



New York diocese on Sunday. Its 
text follows : 

"May I call your attention to the 
important statement of the Catholic 
Bishops' Committee, recently pub- 

{Continued on page 8) 



IATSE Takes 
Over 306 to 
End Battles 



In a direct move to quiet further 
internal disturbances, the I. A. T. S. 
E. has taken over operation and con- 
trol of Local 306, exercising its emer- 
gency rights under the international 
constituion. 

This is the second time the inter- 
national has made such a move, the 
first taking place about a year and a 
half ago when insurgents forced pres- 
sure on Sam Kaplan. 

George Browne, president of the 
I. A. T. S. E., personally supervised 

{Continued on page 12) 



Para.-Capitol Pool 
Awaits New Product 

Developments in the Paramount- 
Capitol pool are in status quo, it was 
stated officially yesterday. 

It is likely the deal will not go 
into effect until the new season's prod- 
uct starts coming through, it was 
stated, since three or four big pic- 
tures for the Capitol must be lined up 
before shows will be dropped at the 
house. 



K.C. Test of 
"Bank Nights" 
Up Next Week 



Kansas City, July 12. — The fight 
over "Bank Nights," long sizzling un- 
der cover here, broke into the open 
today when Mrs. A. Baier, acting for 
herself and other exhibitors, filed a 
complaint against E. S. Young, Roa- 
noke Theatre here, to test the legality 
of the practice. 

The grievance board is scheduled to 
hold an open hearing on the complaint 
next Wednesday when all interested 
exhibitors may attend. In the mean- 
time, Affiliated Enterprises, distributor 

{Continued on page 13) 



Distributors Win 
Coast Zoning Suit 

The U. S. Circuit Court of Appeals 
in San Francisco yesterday upheld an 
appeal by major distributors and the 
Los Angeles Film Board of Trade 
from the $35,336 judgment rendered 
against them in the action brought by 
Fae Robison, former operator of the 
Seville, Inglewood, Cal., according to 
a telegram to the Hays office. The 

(Continued on page 13) 



Studio Work Slows Down 
As Code Observance 
Day Approaches 



Hollywood, July 12. — Producers 
are ready for the new order under 
the Production Code Administration 
which becomes effective Saturday mid- 
night. 

Actual production has slowed down 
while pictures in work or planned 
have been submitted to stringent 
scrutiny in the wholesale effort to 
meet the mandates of strengthened 
code administration. 

Studios realize their responsibility 
is to be measured by their adherence 
to the code and incline toward the 
general belief that with July 15 they 
enter upon a new day in the business. 

Coast reaction to the New York 
decision permitting exhibitors to can- 
cel product on publicly voiced moral 
grounds finds major studio executives 
in accord. Their opinion is that the 
industry thereby has manifested an 
(Continued on page 8) 



Eastern Code Board 
Starts Functioning 

The eastern end of the reinforced 
Production Code Administration be- 
gan to function yesterday under Vin- 
cent G. Hart, representative here of 
Joseph I. Breen with approval of 
"Hits of Today," a'Mentone two-reel 
musical distributed by Universal. 

The short was given a certificate 
with the Number .01. The ciphers 
are being used to designate pictures 
code-approved in the east whereas 
coast approbation will be designated 
by numbers, but no ciphers. 



Campi Names More 
To Coast Committees 

Producer elections to the actors' 
and writers' committees in Hollywood 
were named yesterday by Campi. These 
supplement selections by Division 

{Continued on page 13) 



Was, But Isn't 

Hollywood, July 12.— Colum- 
bia's studio theme song re- 
cently was "It All Duponts 
on You." 

The song was, it isn't to- 
day! 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Friday, July 13, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



(Registered U. S. Patent Office) 



Vol. 36 



July 13, 1934 



No. 10 




Martin Quigley 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 
MAURICE KANN 

Editor 
JAMES A. CRON 
Advertising Manager 5.— — 



Published daily except Sunday and holi- 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub- 
sidiary of Quigley Publications, Inc., 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 1790 Broadway, New 
York. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Cable ad- 
dress "Quigpubco, New York." All con- 
tents copyrighted 1934 by Motion Picture 
Daily, Inc. Address all correspondence to 
the New York Office. Other Quigley pub- 
lications: MOTION PICTURE HERALD, 
UETTER THEATRES, THE MOTION 
PICTURE ALMANAC and THE CHI- 
CAGOAN. 

Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Life 
Building, Vine and Yucca Streets, Victor 
M. Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 407 
South Dearborn Street, Edwin S. Clif- 
ford, manager; London Bureau: Remo 
House, 310 Regent St., London, W. 1, 
Bruce Allan, Representative. Cable address: 
"Quigpubco, London"; Berlin Bureau: 
Berlin - Tempelhof , Kaiserin - Augustastrasse 
28, Joachim K. Rutenberg, Representative; 
Paris Bureau: 19, Rue de la Cour des- 
Noues, Pierre Autre, Representative; Rome 
Bureau: Viale Gorizia, Vittorio Malpassuti, 
Representative; Sydney Bureau: 102 Sus- 
sex Street, Cliff Holt, Representative; Mex- 
ico City Bureau: Apartado 269, James 
Lockhart, Representative; Glasgow Bureau: 
86 Dundrennan Road, G. Holmes, Repre- 
sentative; Budapest Bureau: 11 Olasz 
Fasor 17, Endre Hevesi, Representative. 

Entered as second class matter January 
4, 1926 at the Post Office at New York 
City, N. Y., under Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada $15 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 



Revive "Min and Bill" 

The Capitol will stage a repeat run 
of "Min and Bill" for a week begin- 
ning July 20. 

Loew nouses in Wilmington, Colum- 
bus and Baltimore will also repeat, 
but M-G-M has no plans to reissue 
the Dressier-Beery picture nationally. 



M-G-M Signs Chevalier 

Hollywood, July 12. — Chevalier has 
signed a long-term contract with 
M-G-M. First, however, he goes to 
London to do a picture for Alexander 
Korda and London Films. 



Weber Joins Laboratory 

John Weber, former general sales 
manager of Majestic, has joined Pro- 
ducers' Laboratories, Inc., headed by 
Harry Glickman, as treasurer and 
general sales manager. 



Through United Artists 

"The Private Life of Don Juan" 
will not be released by Mundus as 
incorrectly stated in yesterday's issue. 
The production will be released 
through United Artists. 



Loew Boston Dividend 

Boston, July 12. — Loew's Boston 
Theatres Co. has declared a regular 
quarterly dividend of IS cents, paya- 
ble Aug. 1 to stock of record July 21. 



RKO Tops Ball League 

RKO heads the M. P. Baseball 
League as result of a 14-2 victory 
over NBC. 



Erpi Wins Pointer 
In Vocafilm Action 



Judge Knox in the U. S. District 
Court for the Southern District of 
New York yesterday granted Erpi's 
motion for the dismissal of the $65,- 
953,125 triple damages action brought 
by the Vocafilm Corp. because of the 
plaintiff's failure to supply a $250 
bond as had been previously directed 
by the court. The decision does not 
become effective for 30 days during 
which time Vocafilm will have an op- 
portunity to make good the default. 

Attorneys for Vocafilm informed 
the court that they had been unable to 
locate their principal either by cor- 
respondence or personal contact. 

in another decision in the same 
court, Judge Knox directed the 
Mower Garden Amusement Corp. and 
others to show the profits made by 
each house since the installation of 
Western Electric sound. The ruling 
was in answer to specific interroga- 
tions asked by Erpi in the suit brought 
by the theatres. The houses had ob- 
jected to supplying this information. 

The plaintiffs, headed by the Flower 
Garden Amusement Corp., comprise 
about 40 companies operating houses 
in Brooklyn, the Bronx and adjacent 
territories. 



Take Jersey Theatre 

Arthur Seigel and Max Cohen have 
acquired the Ritz, Lyndhurst, N. J., 
from Haring & Blumenthal, and plan 
to reopen the house in August. 

The independents also operate the 
Ramsey, Ramsey ; Lyndhurst, Lynd- 
hurst, N. J., and the Selwyn in New 
York. 



Miss Wynyard Sailing 

Hollywood, July 12. — Diana Wyn- 
yard, earlier reports notwithstanding, 
sails for England on the Aquitania 
Saturday from New York. 



Kinzler on Vacation 

Morris Kinzler left last night for 
Brant Lake, N. Y., for a week's vaca- 
tion. 



To Show "Jane Eyre" 

Monogram will trade show "Jane 
Eyre" at 11 o'clock next Monday 
morning at the Criterion. 



Mundus Designates 7 
Of Its Sales Force 



Seven sales representatives have 
been lined up by Mundus, according to 
Earl W. Kramer, general manager. 

The men and their respective terri- 
tories are : Jack Groves, Denver and 
Salt Lake ; Charles M. Davie, De- 
troit ; Harry Goldberg, Chicago ; 
John Graham, Kansas City ; Edward 
Sapiro, Milwaukee ; Lionel Wasson, 
Omaha ; and William R. Karsteter, 
St. Louis. 

Additional representatives in other 
territories are on the way. 



Wilcox Sailing, But 
Returns in 6 Weeks 

Herbert Wilcox sails for England 
tomorrow on the Aquitania. He has 
completed a visit of five weeks in this 
country during which he arranged for 
the release of 23 British-made films 
in America through Mundus. 

The director, who is also production 
head of British and Dominions, ex- 
pects to return here in six weeks to 
complete further negotiations for an 
interchange of stars and directors be- 
tween the United States and England. 



Dubinsky Home Bombed 

Kansas City, July 12. — Ed Dubin- 
sky 's son narrowly escaped injury 
when a bomb exploded early this 
morning in the home of the head of 
Dubinsky circuit. 

Dubinsky definitely blames the op- 
erators' and stagehands' unions here 
and at St. Joseph, Mo., with whom 
he has been at odds for several months. 
The Dubinsky group is non-union. 



Libel Appeal Heard 



London, July 12 
Princess Irina Al 
soupoff against M- 
rehearing today on 
by the producer, 
the Princess, who 
been libeled in ' 
Empress," won an 



— The libel suit of 
exandrovna Yous- 
G-M came up for 
an appeal brought 
At the first trial 
claimed she had 
Rasputin and the 
award of $125,000. 



Para. Meeting Set Back 

A special Paramount creditors' 
meeting slated to be held yesterday 
morning before Referee Davis was 
postponed until July 26. 



Eastman Up x /ion Big Board 



Consolidated Film Ind., pfd 

Eastman Kodak 

Fox Film "A" 

Loew's, Inc 

Loew's, Inc., pfd 

Paramount Publix 

Pathe Exchange 

Pathe Exchange "A" 19y. 

RKO 2H 

Universal Pictures pfd 39 

Warner Bros 5 



High 

1354 
98}4 
13 

27J4 
91 



Low 

13% 

98 

125* 

27 

91 

356 

154 
19/2 

39 
434 



Close 

13% 
98 
12% 
27-4 
91 
3% 

1% 

19'A 

2Yi 
39 



Net 
Change 

- % 
+ 54 

- % 

- % 
+ % 



Technicolor Lone Curb Issue 



Net 



Sales 

100 
400 
300 

1,700 
100 
800 

2.900 
400 
200 
10 

1,300 



Technicolor 



General Theatre Equip. 6s '40 

Keith, B. F., 6s '46 

Loew's 6s '41 ww deb. rights 

Paramount Broadway 554s '51 

Paramount F. L. 6s '47 

Paramount Publix 55^s, 50 

Pathe 7s '37 ww 9954 

Warner Bros. 6s '39 wd 



High 


Low 


Close 


Change 


Sales 


1354 


1354 


1354 




100 


Slightly 












Net 




High 


Low 


Close 


Change 


Sales 


7 


7 


7 


1 


68 


67M 


6734 




1 


10054 


10054 


10054 


+ 54 


15 


40 


39 


40 


+M 


11 


4854 


48% 


48% 


4 


4854 


48% 


483/g 


— Vs 


4 


9954 


99y 2 


99'/S 


+ 54 


1 


54% 


5454 


sm 


+ % 


14 



< Purely 
Personal ► 

LOU GOLDBERG is sitting on pins 
and needles. Tomorrow he goes to 
Denver for a two weeks' vacation and 
Warners and Fox are bidding for his 
book "The Unsinkable Mrs. Jay." He 
hopes one of the deals will be closed 
before he treks west. 

Vicente Padula, Argentine actor, 
has been signed by Frank Z. Cle- 
mente and Lewis Maisell, indepen- 
dent producers, for the first of six 
pictures to be made by them in the 
east. 

Joe Toplitsky, Los Angeles real- 
tor long identified with deals involv- 
ing theatres, is in town. Recently 
over an appendicitis operation, he will 
not go to Europe, as planned. 

S. E. Piza, manager of Carlos 
Gardel, Argentine tango singer, is 
limping these days. It's charley-horse 
from cavorting on the sands of the 
Atlantic Beach Club. 

Frank Bruner left for Chicago 
yesterday to handle the publicirv for 
Mary Pickford at the World's Fair 
where "Pickford Day" will be cele- 
brated tomorrow. 

Glen Caldwell, RKO film booker 
in Chicago, left for his home city 
yesterday following a vacation and 
business confabs here. 

Rupert Hughes' story, "The Old 
Nest," and James Hilton's novel- 
ette, "Goodbye Mr. Chips," have been 
bought by M-G-M. 

Anna May Wong is due in on the 
Aquitania today on her way to thejl 
coast to appear with George Raft in[' 
"Limehouse Nights." 

Charles MacDonald, RKO the- 
atre division manager, sailed on thef 
Colombia for a vacation in the West) 
Indies yesterday. 

Morton Van Praag, general sales 
manager of National Screen, has been 
appointed a Kentucky colonel. 

Dorothy Mackaill is back from 
Europe. She went abroad in William 
Randolph Hearsts party. 

Samuel Cummins sails for Europe I 
tomorrow on the Aquitania. He's after | 
more foreign pictures. 

Nate Blumberg won't be able toj 
join his family, now vacationing on 
the coast, after all. 

Ben Cohen of the Warner theatre 
department in Chicago is in town on ai 
vacation. 

Eddie Golden back from Atlanta 
and the GFTA exhibitor convention. 

Charles Rogers arrives July 16 on 
the Santa Paula from the coast. 



FWC Loses Coast Case 

Los Angeles, July 12. — The griev- 
ance board today ruled in favor of 
American Theatres, Inc., against Fox 
West Coast. It was held the com- 
plainant should continue to get prod- 
uct in accordance with its agreement 
with Fox. 



May Join Frisco Strike 

San Francisco, July 12. — The The- 
atre Federation of San Francisco, 
comprising over 3,000 members, has 
voted to participate in the general 
strike which will probably be called 
Monday. 



ight in the middle of New York's blazing heat wave . . . 



3 





rd 



WEEK FOR 
SHIRLEY 
TEMPLE 
at 6200-seat 



ROXY 

(N. Y.) 



FIRST 3-week run at the world's 
largest theatre in nearly 
3 years .... and that was with 
"Bad Girl" (also FOX). Typical of 
the business this phenomenal FOX 
star is doing the country over. 
Watch for her next FOX picture. 



BABY 
A BOW 




// 




with 



SHIRLEY TEMPLE 

JAMES DUNN 
CLAIRE TREVOR 

ALAN DINEHART 
Produced by John Stone 

Screen play by Philip Klein and 
E. E. Paramore, Jr. 
Based on a piay by James P. Judge 
Dir i>y Harry Lachmon 




PICTURE 






THE COAST JOINS 

While $2.00 Criterion audiences applaud 
jj every show . • . "Variety Daily" adds to 
Ik the parade of raves . • • 





*tf e * *C\* e * 




THE CHORUS OF PRAISE! 




MADELEINE CARROLL 
FRANCHOT TONE 

Produced by Winfield Sheehan 

Directed by John Ford 
Story and screen play by Reginald Berkeley 





/ 





Get a load o' this, monkey! I just 
heard I busted all records for th' 
last 14 months at th' world's 
premeer of my new show in 
Newport-with th' temprachoor 
a hunnerd an' ten in th' 
shade! ... Boy !-g m I terrific! 



HERE COMI 

WITH THE UNITED STATES FLEET AN 
STUART • FRANK McHUGH • DIRECTE 




Lissen, you three-dollar- 
a-day admiral! It wuzn't 
14 mont's-it wuz fif- 
teen* An' it wuzn't no 
hunnerd an' ten -it wuz 
a hunnerd an' twenty. 
An' it wuzn't Newport 
-it wuz Norfolk. An' it 
ain't you that's terrific 
-it's ME! 



VIES CAGNEY • PAT O'BRIEN • GLORIA 
f LLOYD BACON FOR WARNER BROS 



Vitagraph, Inc., Distributors 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Friday, July 13, 1934 



46 



11 



No Check on 
Legitimate 
Fun — Hayes 



(Continued from page 1) 

lished, informing us of the very not- 
able progress of the campaign launched 
by the Committee 'against the de- 
structive moral influences of evil mo- 
tion pictures.' 

"Last November at the meeting in 
Washington of the Bishops of the 
United States, His Excellency the 
Most Reverend Bishop of Los Angeles 
presented an exhaustive report on the 
vastness of the motion picture indus- 
try, its almost universal appeal to the 
people, its dangerous power, and its 
abuse of opportunity by production of 
lustful and depraved pictures. A 
Committee of the Hierarchy made up 
of Their Excellencies the Archbishop 
of Cincinnati, the Bishop of Los An- 
geles, the Bishop of Pittsburgh and 
the Bishop of Fort Wayne has been 
very active, even conferring with rep- 
resentatives of the largest producers 
in the country. 

Would Help Country 

"It is most heartening to all who 
would have our beloved land stand 
high on the better, nobler and cleaner 
plane of life, to observe the wide- 
spread awakening throughout the 
country to the evil character and 
shocking debasement of many motion 
pictures. 

"The American public — Protestant, 
Jew, and Catholic — is rising, thank 
God, to determined action to put a stop 
to productions that, for the sake of 
monetary greed, debauch the sense of 
America's moral decency which until 
recently, neither stage nor screen 
would dare offend as openly and as 
flagrantly as at present. 

"The moral forces of the Nation, 
hoping that the motion picture produc- 
ers would see the practical wisdom 
of cleaning their own house, have 
been too patient, tolerant, and long- 
suffering with offensive productions. 
Some years ago I sent to the National 
Motion Picture Congress a plea for 
censorship from within the industry. 
Many others, I am sure, interested in 
the motion picture as an invaluable 
educational, cultural, entertaining 
agency for good, have been protesting 
in vain against the ever growing 
degradation and perversion of the 



Holds No Drab View 

"The Catholic Church takes no 
drab view of lawful pleasure. She is 
a mother of joy and limits her peni- 
tential season to some few weeks of 
the year, even interrupting it with an 
outburst of gladness. She rejoices in 
seeing her children happy, smiling in 
the enjoyment of normal, reasonable 
and wholesome amusement. Gladly 
would the Church bless the screen, 
were it to be morally clean in its pres- 
entation of the realities of life and its 
creation of mirth-provoking situations. 

"Reform, restriction and suppression 
that w r ould deprive the people of legiti 
mate pleasure are not in contempla- 
tion. What is to be condemned as 
reprehensible — and justly so — is the 
glorification of crime, lust, and, in 
general, the serious violation of the 



Wants Hays, Pettijohn and Producers 



Milliken to Resign Posts 



The resignation of Will H. Hays, 
carrying with him Charles C. Petti- 
john and Carl E. Milliken, is demand- 
ed by independent theatre owners, 
Allied States is informing its members 
in a lengthy bulletin issued in Wash- 
ington yesterday. The bulletin asserts 
one leader of the Catholic movement 
against objectionable films declared 
"very bluntly that vigilance will not 
be relaxed or a normal attitude to- 
ward the movies resumed so long as 
Will Hays and his associates retain 
their authority over the industry." 
The "leader" is not designated by 
name. 

The bulletin further says Allied has 
"always cooperated with sincere 
groups looking to the betterment of 
screen conditions." This, the asser- 
tion is made, has "brought down upon 
the heads of Allied leaders the wrath 
of the Haysites. Reviving its ancient 
allegation that the trade press is pro- 
ducer dominated, the bulletin im- 
mediately thereafter alleges the wrath 
allegedly heaped on Allied leaders 
from Hays members has developed 
from trade papers as well. Specific 
instances are nowhere cited. 

Asserting many exhibitors have 
"expressed surprise and regret" that 
the President has been "indifferent to 
the complaints of the exhibitors and 



the reports of the Darrow board," the 
communication draws the conclusion 
that the truth has never reached the 
President's ears. From the text on 
this point: 

"Two of the President's secretaries, 
Mclntyre and Early, are former 
newsreel men, the former being con- 
nected with Pathe, the latter with 
Paramount. Frank Walker, one of 
his closest advisers, is a former 
Comerford (Paramount) man. J. P. 
Kennedy, new head of the Securities 
Commission, is an old Pathe man. 
Rosenblatt, with Xathan Burkan, was 
counsel for various producers. Miss 
Robinson, executive assistant under 
General Johnson, is a former em- 
ployee of RKO. H. M. Warner is 
a friend of the President and one of 
the largest individual contributors to 
his campaign fund. 

"In view of this, what sort of in- 
formation do you suppose the Presi- 
dent gets regarding conditions in the 
motion picture industry? 

"Add to all this the fact that the 
President's political advisers undoubt- 
edly believe that the Big Eight must 
be catered to in order to get preferred 
treatment in the newsreels and you 
will not miss the answer to the fore- 
going question." 



law of God and man in things sacred 
to home and society. 

"Public safety demands that we es- 
tablish quarantine against epidemic, 
enforce measures against unsanitary 
conditions, and guard our water sup- 
ply lest contagion, infection and con- 
tamination harm the physical well- 
being of our people. To be consistent, 
we should be equally concerned about 
the general moral tone of the Nation. 
A serious lowering of the moral stand- 
ards of any community menaces the 
common good and weakens, if it does 
not destroy, the sanctions that guaran- 
tee peace and prosperity. 

"Civilization would not long endure 
were we a race of physical giants but 
dwarfed morally. The true ideal of 
any nation must be based on the prop- 
erly balanced physical, intellectual, 
moral and spiritual life of the people. 
History records the inevitable ruin of 
nation after nation when moral laws 
are violated and spiritual ideals van- 
ish. Evil motion pictures in their 
baneful influence undermine the moral 
foundation of the State. 

Clean Films Public's Right 

"Another serious consideration sug- 
gests the question wmy certain pro- 
ducers of motion pictures are per- 
mitted to counteract, to put it mildly, 
the influence of public and private 
schools which spend millions and 
millions annually for the education 
and the formation of character of the 
young. Dr. Campbell, our Superin- 
tendent of Schools, impressively writes : 

" 'There is little doubt in my mind 
that much of the good that the schools 
are doing, especially in the field of 
character training and the develop- 
ment of right social attitudes, is being 
undermined and even thwarted by sub 
standard motion pictures.' 

"The motion picture is more potent 
in impressionable and compelling effect 
(Continued on page 9) 



Protestants in Phila. 
Told to Back Legion 

Philadelphia, July 12. — The Phila- 
delphia Federation of Churches today 
issued an open letter to 1,000,000 
Protestants urging support of the 
Legion of Decency and congratulating 
the Catholic bishops on their stand 
on objectionable films. The letter, 
prepared by the federation's depart- 
ment of civic interests, cites the find- 
ings of the Payne Fund on the subject. 

"Motion picture magnates by rea- 
son of their indifference to decency 
and misinterpretation of public sensi- 
bility," says the communication, "have 
sown the wind. The country now is 
reaping the whirlwind of organized 
crime, unrest and demoralization, dis- 
regard of law and authority, moral 
collapse in the home and society and 
an oncoming generation fired by pas- 
sions and low ideals which will lead 
it to certain degradation and miserv." 



Connecticut to Open 
Film Drive on Sunday 

Hartford, July 12. — The Legion of 
Decency will extend its activities to 
Connecticut Sunday, when all Catholic 
churches in the state will ask their 
parishioners to stay away from un- 
clean films. A pastoral letter, prepared 
by Bishop Maurice F. McAuliffe of 
the Hartford diocese, calling on Cath- 
olics to protest against objectionable 
films, will be read at all masses. 



Southeastern Catholics 
Joining Legion's Drive 

Atlanta, July 12. — Southeastern 
Catholics have been urged to join the 
Legion of Decency campaign by the 
Rev. Michael J. Keyes, bishop of 
Savannah. 



Clear Decks 
For New Deal 



(Continued from paae 1) 

exceptional spirit of cooperation to 
the extent of a possible loss of hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars in rev- 
enue. 

Reluctant to talk for publication 
on the plea that the question is one 
concerning exhibition and distribution 
and, therefore, does not properly fall 
into the province of production, some 
executives, nevertheless, foresee dis- , 
putes developing with some exhibitors 
who might attempt to turn the good 
intention of the distributors into an , 
evasion of contracts, using the moral 
ground issue as their excuse. 

Will Hays, in a meeting of members 
of the Ass'n of M. P. Producers, 
western affiliate of the M. P. P. D. A., 
has discussed at length the program 
adopted on June 13 at the meeting of L 
the directors of the eastern associa- 
tion. Code resolutions analogous to 
those adopted in the east were passed , 
by the western association here. 

Quality of Product Involved 

"It is recognized that the solution 
of the problem of the right kind of ', 
screen entertainment rests solely with 
the quality of the product and these 
strengthened arrangements are direct- ! 
ed to the discharging of that responsi- 1 
bility more effectively." he declared. 1 

The new arrangement will cover all 1 
product produced and distributed by _ 
the following companies : Columbia, 
C. B. De Mille Prod.. Walt Disney 
Prod., Educational. First National. 
Fox, Samuel Goldwyn Prod., Inspira- 
tion Pictures, Jesse L. Lasky Prod.. 
M-G-M, Paramount, Pathe. Princi- I 
pal, Reliance, RKO, B. P. Schulberg 
Prod., 20th Century, United Artists. 
Universal, Yitagraph. Warners and I 
any others who want to avail them- | 
selves of the new system which calls 
for certificates of approval. 

The list includes production com- 
panies not earlier mentioned in New 
York. All of them, however, release 
through major distributors who are 
members of the M. P. P. D. A. 

It is interesting to note that the 
line up includes Samuel Goldwyn 
Prod, and 2Gth Century, both com- 
panies no longer members of the Ass'n 
of M. P. Producers. 



Say 45% of Profitable 
Territory Has Censors 

Producers face censorship in 45 per 
cent of their profit territory, declared 
the Associated Press yesterday in a 
Hollywood dispatch which added cen- 
sorship prevails in seven states and 133 
cities. 



Won't Publish Deletions 

Richmond, Jury 12. — Protests by 
producers and exchanges over publi- 
cation of bulletins listing deletions 
made by the state board of censor; 
have resulted in a decision by the 
board to suspend release of the bul- 
letins. 



Warners Sign Vallee 

Hollywood, July 12. — Rudy Yallee 
has been signed by Warners for 
musical. 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



l-nday, July 13, 1934 



Check on 
' ' Legitimate 9 ' 
Fun — Hayes 

[Continued from page 8) 

ba people of all classes than all our 
ther refining and educational agen- 
:;es. The American peopl.e therefore, 
iave a right to look for productions 
hat are clean, safe, elevating and 
.vholesome in their theme and method 
if entertainment. 

"Were the mothers of America 
i roused to the necessity of protecting 
iheir children from the moral defile- 
nent that lurks in every depraved 
notion picture, they would shun the 
>lace that presents it as they would 
ivoid with horror a pest-house. 

"Please read this letter at all the 
Masses on Sunday, July 15, and pre- 
pare your people for the organization 
n early October of the Legion of De- 
:ency, which already has enrolled 
hundreds of thousands throughout the 
: ountry." 

Important developments are expect- 
ed to come out of a meeting to be 
leld this morning at the headquarters 
)f the Federal Council of the Church- 
es of Christ in America. Leaders of 
he Protestant denominations will dis- 
:uss at the gathering further steps in 
:he council's drive on unclean films. 



Coast PTA Links Self 
With Purging Screen 

Los Axceles. July 12. — The Cali- 
"ornia congress of Parent-Teacher 
issociations, representing 185,000 
nembers, has allied itself with the 
T.ovement to purge the screen and has 
"ccommended the division of pictures 
nto three classifications — adult, fam- 
ily and children — for the guidance of 
parents. The recommendation also 
las been made that family programs 
:>e put on Friday and Saturday nights. 

Exhibitors in residential districts 
lave been asKed to eliminate dual 
'Jills. Courses in film appreciation in 
mblic schools are advocated. Off- 
:olor sequences have been denounced 
and an appeal made for the elimina- 
tion of scenes expounding the tech- 
nique of crime. Also demanded are 
fewer drinking scenes and more stories 
about decent people. 



Sidetrack Offensive; 
Move Held Unnecessary 

Kansas City. July 12. — Various 
•neasures to deal with the religious 
campaign against indecent films were 
discussed at a meeting of the I. T. O. 
nere, but all proposals were tabled for 
the present because the exhibitors 
failed to agree that a counter-offensive 
was necessary at this time. 

One proposal was for a local com- 
Inittee of exhibitors to call on the 
i Catholic clergy with a view of deflect- 
ing the campaign from the independent 
theatres, on the ground they are in no 
way responsible. That action was held 
in abeyance because it was held the 
situation is not yet sufficiently alarm- 
ing from the box office standpoint 
here and by the time the local cru- 
sade reaches its full force the theatres 
will be showing new season releases 
which are expected to be "toned 
down." 

However, the exhibitors were in 



Comics Re-Signed 

Hollywood, July 12.— With 
"Kentucky Colonels" yet to 
go under their old contract, 
Bert Wheeler and Bob Wool- 
sey have signed a new Radio 
deal calling for three pic- 
tures in the next 18 months. 



agreement that there is an excess of 
salaciousness in films, and has been 
for some time, and that a "clean-up" 
was necessary. The independents said 
they hoped the producers would sin- 
cerely institute reform. 

Virginia Houses Not 
Hit by the Movement 

Richmond, Va., July 12. — While the 
Catholic movement has spread to Vir- 
ginia and there are Protestant joiners 
to the ranks, theatres have been little 
affected by the situation, it was re- 
ported today. 

In averring the "Hollywood golden 
goose is up for killing," the Catholic 
Virginian commends the Legion of 
Decency as the only effective means of 
stopping without further delay the 
"disgusting and degenerate displays 
that have made of a noble invention a 
diabolical contraption and have tainted 
the whole world with a perverted and 
untrue picture of American life, man- 
ners and morals." The Norfolk Pres- 
bytery, at a meeting at Virginia Beach, 
passed resolutions pledging its minis- 
ters to preach on the subject of films 
and to present pledge cards of the Le- 
gion to Presbyterians for their signa- 
tures. 

Little attention had been paid in Vir- 
ginia to the drive until this week, al- 
though there was some speculation as 
to whether the boycott would be at- 
tempted in this state. Edwin S. Reid, 
who succeeded Richard C. L. Mon- 
cure as director of the State Division 
of M. P. Censorship, said today only a 
few of the films listed as immoral and 
indecent had come to Virginia and 
that the necessary eliminations were 
made in them. He did not regard all 
the listed pictures as unfit to be shown 
in this state. 



Legion Makes Debut 
In Milwaukee Sector 

Milwaukee, July 12. — The first unit 
here of the Legion of Decency has 
been organized at St. Boniface's 
Church. All societies of the parish 
have been asked to sign pledge cards 
and, according to the Rev. Lawrence 
Kasper, assistant pastor, the response 
has been encouraging. 

He said it was probable, when Arch- 
bishop Samuel A. Stritch returns from 
his visit to Rome, that the entire arch- 
diocese would be asked to enlist in 
the Legion. 

Wilmington Organizes 
Clean Film Committee 

Wilmington, July 12. — The first 
major step in the local agitation 
against salacious films was taken to- 
day when an advisory and vigilance 
committee was appointed at a meeting 
of church and synagogue representa- 
tives. 

Mrs. E. N. Barsham, former chair- 
man of the film committee of the 
State Federation of Women's Clubs 
and organizer of the Better Films 
I Committee, was named chairman. 



Other members are : Rev. J. Francis 
Tucker, St. Anthony's Catholic 
Church ; Rev. Ralph L. Minker, presi- 
dent of the Wilmington Council of 
Churches, and Rabbi Jacob Kraft. 

Although the committee will not 
have jurisdiction outside of this city, 
it is expected its moves will be fol- 
lowed in other parts of the state. 
Church moves made nationally were 
endorsed today. Exhibitors will be 
asked to cooperate. 

New Buffalo Group 
Opposes a Boycott 

Buffalo, July 12. — A Better Films 
Council has been formed with Mrs. 
James F. Rice, president of the Buf- 
falo City Federation of Women's 
Clubs, as its head. Through this 
agency, the federation's reviewing 
committee will be enlarged and fre- 
quent reports of films approved and 
disapproved will be issued. Co-opera- 
tion with local exhibitors for better 
pictures will be attempted. The group 
is opposed to the boycott as it "would 
mean possible bankruptcy to a large 
group of Buffalo business men." 



Des Moines Register 
Tries New Roto Idea 

Des Moines, July 12. — "Hollywood 
Uncensored" is a new- rotogravure fea- 
ture in the Sun-day Register here 
showing little known photographs of 
film celebrities and timed simultane- 
ously with the campaign by the 
churches. 

Local managers say they have felt 
little results of the present movement 
sweeping the country, although most 
of the current releases are on the 
"offensive" or "immoral list." 



Methodists Enlist in 
Growing Church Move 

Chicago, July 12. — The World 
Service Commission of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church has officially joined 
the church campaign for better elim- 
ination of objectionable pictures and 
will circulate pledge cards similar to 
those used in the Catholic Legion of 
Decency Drive. 



New Coast Contracts 

Hollywood, July 12. — Paramount 
has signed three writers to the con- 
tract list. Scriveners are David Hertz 
and Mackinlay Kantor, who will do 
an untitled original, and Harry Rus- 
kin, temporarily unassigned. 

Florence Fair, New York stage ac- 
tress, has signed a long term contract 
with Warners. 



Plans Edgar Guest Films 

Imperial Distributing, through Wil- 
liam M. Pizor, has signed Edgar A. 
Guest, poet, to supply 13 poems for 
a series of shorts to be known as 
"Poetic Gems." Cy Braunstein will 
supervise production. 



Noel Coward Stricken 

London, July 12. — Noel Coward 
was operated on today for appendicitis. 
He was taken ill last night while play- 
ing in "Conversation Piece" and was 
rushed to the hospital from the theatre. 



French Showing Tonight 

A French showing will be held by 
John S. Tapernoux aboard the 
Cham plain tonight. "Lac aux Dames" 
and "Toi Que J' Adore" will be shown. 



9 

"Operator 13" 
Gets $18,400 
On the Coast 



Los Angeles, July 12. — Cash cus- 
tomers went for "Operator 13" in a 
big way at Loew's State and sent the 
gross skyrocketing $4,400 over normal 
for a total of $18,400. 

Business showed signs of improve- 
ment in other spots. "The Old Fash- 
ioned Way" hit $19,476 at the Para- 
mount. 

Total first run business was $73,676. 
Average is $71,850. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 1 1 : 

"THE VIRGIN MAN" (French) 

FILM ARTE— (900), 40c-50c, 2nd week, 7 
days. Gross: $1,800. (Average, $2,650) 
' OPERATOR 13" (M-G-M) 

LOEW'S STATE— (2,413), 30c-55c, 7 days. 
Gross: $18,400. (Average. $14,000) 
"THE OLD FASHIONED WAY" (Para.) 

PARAMOUNT— (3,595), 30c-55c,-7 days. 
Stage: F. & M. "Vacation Days." Gross: 
$19,476. (Average, $18,000) 
"THE LIFE OF VERGIE WINTERS" 
(Radio) 

RKO— (2,700), 25c-40c, 7 days. Gross: 
$8,500. (Average, $8,000) 

"THE KEY" (Warners) 
WARNER BROS. (HOLLYWOOD)- 
(3,000). 25c-55c. 7 days. Gross: $12,000. 
(Average, $14,000) 

"THE KEY" (Warners) 
WARNER BROS. (DOWNTOWN)- 
(3,400), 25c-55c. 7 days. Gross: $10,000. 
(Average. $12,000) 

"LET'S TRY AGAIN" (Radio) 
"LET'S TALK IT OVER" (Univ.) 
PANTAGES— (3,000), 25c-40c. 7 days. 
Gross: $3,500. (Average, $3,200) 



"Take Bow" Proves 
Sensation in K. C. 

Kansas City, July 12. — "Baby Take 
a Bow" proved a real sensation, zoom- 
ing the Uptown's take to $6,900, al- 
most doubling average, and was held 
for a second week. Hailed by the Star 
as a clean picture, it drew many 
Catholics and had a heavy family 
patronage. At the 25-cent gate and 
with many children's admissions in- 
cluded, the gross is claimed by the 
management to represent an attendance 
record. 

The Tower nabbed $6,600, up by 
$1,600, on "The Hell Cat" and a stage 
show. The Newman's take on "He 
Was Her Man" and "Private Scandal" 
hit an average $6,000. Elsewhere busi- 
ness was off. 

Total first run business was $33,000. 
Average is $29,500. 

Estimated takings : 

Week Ending July 3: 

"THE CIRCUS CLOWN" (F. N.) 
"MOST PRECIOUS THING IN LIFE" 
(Col.) 

MAINSTREET— (3,100), 25c, 5 days, plus 
Saturday late show. Gross: $4,400. (Av- 
erage, 5 days, $5,000) 

Week Ending July 5: 

"MURDER IN THE PRIVATE CAR" 
(M-G-M) 

MIDLAND— (4,000), 25c, 7 days, plus 
Saturday mjdnight show. Gross: $9,100. (Av- 
erage. $10,000) 

"HE WAS HER MAN" (Warners) 
"PRIVATE SCANDAL" (Para.) 

NEWMAN—(1,800), 25c, 7 days, plus 
Saturday late show. Gross: $6,000. (Aver- 
age, $6,000) 

"THE HELL CAT" (Col.) 

TOWER— (2,200), 25c, 7 days, plus Satur- 
day midnight show. Stage: "Eskimo 
Frolics" and vaudeville featuring: Four 
Franks, Jimmie Dunn, Pickard and His 
Seal. Campus Bros. Gross: $6,600. (Average, 
$5,000) 

Week Ending July 6: 

"BABY TAKE A BOW" (Fox) 

UPTOWN— (2,000), 25c, 7 days. Gross: 
$6,900. (Average, $3,500) 



GET READY 
FOR A HIT! 

• 

The kind of a picture that 
spells big business for 
every type theatre! 
• 

A ROMANTIC COMEDY- 
DRAMA WITH MUSIC ! 

Youth! Pep! Rhythm! 
Laughs! Drama! Speed! 

O V) d 

EXPLOITATION! 

with 

ROGER PRYOR- HEATHER ANGEL 

ESTHER RALSTON-VICTOR MOORE-RUTH 

DONNELLY— PAUL KAYE. Story by Sig Herzig and 
Jay Gorney. Songs by Jay Gorney and Don Hartman. 
Directed by Stuart Walker. A Stanley Bergerman 
Production, presented by Carl Laemmle. 

A UNIVERSAL PICTURE 



12 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Friday, July 13, 1934 



Fixes July 20 
Deadline for 
Fox Met. Deal 



(Continued from page 1) 

bondholders have with Skouras The- 
atres Corp. and Randforce. J. Robert 
Rubin stated the Loew-Warner bid 
does not include the contracts, al- 
though it is possible Loew might want 
the operators to continue under differ- 
ent terms. 

Charles Littlefield, representing Irv- 
ing Trust in the receivership, asked 
for an extension of the receivership, 
which expires Aug. 18. Judge Mack 
granted two months. 

During most of the hearing the 
judge seemed to lean toward throwing 
out the Loew-Warner bid in favor of 
the reorganization plan and asked for 
other bids. With none forthcoming, 
Rubin asked for 10 days grace in 
which he would try "to eliminate the 
difficulties." 

Rubin pointed out the new bid was 
not for the bonds, but for leases and 
said the conditions "were not severe." 
Judge Mack pointed out that if the 
bid is accepted suits may follow over 
the leases, which would not happen if 
the reorganization plan were effectu- 
ated. 

The judge declared he desired a 
bid for the bonds, a bid he has been 
hopeful for until now and which has 
not been made. He added the bond- 
holders' committee and lawyers for 
the bidders are where they originally 
started. He then declared that if no 
bid were made for the bonds he would 
submit to the bondholders' reorganiza- 
tion plan. 

Saul Rogers, who stated he worked 
a year in getting the original Fox Met. 
circuit together, asked for more time 
on the ground that checking up on 
leases, contracts and other details re- 
quired a lot of work. 

Try to Reach Accord 

A meeting was held earlier in the 
day in Judge Mack's chambers be- 
tween S. A. Telsey, counsel for Rand- 
force ; Rubin and Morton G. Bogue 
representing the bondholders' com- 
mittee, at which time an unsuccessful 
effort was made to eliminate the op 
erators from contracts with the com 
mittee. 

Bogue later asked for a short ad- 
journment, stating "we've struggled 
so long on the matter and, feeling the 
responsibility of the committee, we 
think we should make one more at- 
tempt." 

Rubin said that he expected the 
plan to be amended anyway and all 
questionable matters may be obviated 

Abe Tulin, counsel for a group of 
noteholders, objected to the adjourn 
ment as did Telsey, the latter declar 
ing extensions are hurting operation 
of the houses. 

Louis Weiner, counsel for Central 
New York Theatres Corp., said he 
had claims totaling $243,000 against 
the estate, of which $150,000 is against 
Fox Met. He said he had been work 
ing on a settlement for three months 
conditioned on the reorganization 
plans. If the reorganization plan is 
not accepted, he said he will file suit 

Asked whether the latest joint bid 
of $4,500,000 by Loew-Warner for the 
Fox Met. circuit was likely to be in 
creased at the adjourned hearing 



Jittery "Blumey" 

A. C. Blumenthal couldn't 
find a seat for himself yester- 
day at the Fox Met. court 
hearing. When it looked as 
if the judge was going to ac- 
cept the reorganization plan 
in lieu of the Loew-Warner 
bid, Blumenthal made a bee 
line for Saul Rogers and later 
another dash for J. Robert 
Rubin. 



July 20, Rubin yesterday stated it 
would not. 

He said it was not a matter of 
money now but certain clauses in the 
bid which are holding it up. 



Freuler Changes Name 

Freuler Film Associates, Inc., 
through Harry G. Kosch, attorney, has 
filed a certificate in the office of the 
Secretary of the State changing its 
corporate name to Associated Mon- 
arch Corp. 

John R. Freuler, head of the con- 
cern, is said to be working on a new 
plan of distribution. The firm was re- 
named to fit in with the idea. 



Takes Over in August 

Buffalo, July 12. — Operation of 
the Great Lakes, acquired by A. 
Charles Hayman of the Lafayette on 
a 10-year lease, will become effective 
August following redecoration. 
Policy is not determined. 

The theatre, one of the city's big 
ones, has been operated successively 
by Fox, Comerford, Loew's and Shea. 



Indies in Milwaukee 
Form Organization 

Milwaukee, July 12. — A temporary 
independent exhibitors' association was 
organized here today at a meeting of 
representatives of 56 Milwaukee Coun- 
ty 'theatres. E. F. Maertz was named 
chairman; Harry Perlewitz, treasurer, 
and Etta Weisner, secretary. 

Sentiment was opposed to the local 
clearance schedule adopted yesterday. 
It is likely a protest will be made to 
Campi. A wire was sent to Warner 
officials resenting alleged discrimina- 
tion in the pending deal with the Saxe 
Amusement Co. giving the latter War- 
ner-First National product here, 
whereby Warners will show it at 10 
cents less than the Saxe admission. 
The group says this will deprive in- 
dependents of Warner product. 

Another meeting will be held next 
week. 



Temple Film May Go 
Fourth Week at Roxy 

"Baby, Take a Bow" will be held 
for a fourth week at the Roxy from 
present indications. For the second 
week ending last night, the gross was 
$30,000. The first week's take was 
$29,000. 

If the picture is held again, it will 
parallel the booking on "Common 
Clay," which played the house and 
take of which built every day the pic- 
ture was held. 

Bookings on "Baby" for RKO and 
Skouras are being pushed back as a 
result. 



IATSE Takes 
Over 306 to 
End Battles 



{Continued from page 1) 

the move after attending a session late 
Wednesday night by a group of Local 
306 dissentors. Browne told the union 
men that the meeting was illegal and 
ordered the group to disperse. At the 
same time, he told the men of the 
international's plan. 

Browne is reported to have asked 
Harland Holmden, president of the 
Cleveland M. P. Operators, to take 
active charge of the New York local 
for the I. A. T. S. E. 

Supreme Court Justice James Dunne 
yesterday ordered District Attorney 
Geoghan to return forthwith the 
books and all records of Local 306 
seized in a recent raid, declaring the 
seizure unconstitutional and an inva- 
sion of the rights of the union. 



Friedlander Dead 

An attack of indigestion on the I. 
T. O. A. boat ride Wednesday proved 
fatal to Al Friedlander, a partner in 
the Nelson & Renner circuit of Brook- 
lyn. The body was taken off the boat 
at Hart's Island and later shipped to 
New York. 

Funeral services will be held today. 

The exhibitor mentioned is not the 
man of the same name connected with 
First Division. 



Nye Dobbs Dead at 53 

Portland, July 12. — Nye Dobbs, 53, 
recently treasurer for the Multnomah 
Theatres here, is dead at his home in 
this city. He was formerly booker for 
First National and auditor for the old 
Mutual Film Co. 

Mrs. M. E. Ryan Dead 

Hollywood, July 12. — Mrs. M. E. 
Ryan, 70, author of more than 60 
books, many of which found their way 
into films in the silent days, is dead 
here after a long illness. 



Warners' St. Louis 
Appeal Loses Point 

St. Louis, July 12. — Counsel for 
Warners yesterday was denied a mo- 
tion to appeal decision of Judge Davis, 
who recently approved the sale of the 
Ambassador, Missouri and Grand Cen- 
tral to the bondholders' protective 
committee for $2,000,000. 

No date has been set when Fan- 
chon and Marco take over operation, 
the date being contingent on dissolu- 
tion of the present receivership. 



For Distribution Here 

London, July 12. — "The Church 
Mouse" with Laura La Plante will be 
released in the States by Warners, 
who made it here under the quota law. 
It also will get a London run at the 
New Gallery. 



Wichita Clearance 
Due for Protests 

Kansas City, July 12. — In addition 
to appeals filed with Campi on new 
clearance schedules for Kansas City 
and St. Joseph, Mo., it appears likely 
a protest will be lodged against the 
Wichita, Kan., schedule. W. P. Hus- 
ton of the Crawford and Kansas, 
Wichita, has inquired at the local 
code office about appeal procedure. 

The Dubinsky circuit is appealing 
the St. Joseph plan on the ground of 
inadequate protection for first runs 
over subsequents in certain price 
classifications. 

It is reported the remaining sched- 
ule adopted by the local clearance and 
zoning board, that for Atchison, Kan., 
also will be appealed. Roy Dunnuck. 
the town's sole independent, has sig- 
nified his intention of doing so. 

July 30 is the deadline for filing ap- 
peals with Campi on schedules adopted 
by the local board. 



"Bondage" to $75,000 

"Of Human Bondage," which closed 
its second week at the Music Hall 
Wednesday night, did a reported gross 
of $75,000 net. 



Gov't Still Eyes Fox Met 

Despite absence of John H. Amen, special assistant to Attorney 
General Homer S. Cummings, at the court hearing before Federal 
Judge Julian W. Mack yesterday when the new Loew-Warner bid 
of $4,500,000 was made for the Fox Met circuit, the government 
does not intend to drop its investigation for possible anti-trust 
violation. 

Morton G. Bogue, attorney for the bondholders' committee, told 
the court he had received a letter from Amen stating that his in- 
action does not indicate the government is out of the picture, but 
that it intends to continue its investigation. 

The NRA also is watching the deal for possible code violations. 



Present Zoning for 
Wisconsin Proposed 

Milwaukee, July 12. — The same 
zoning now in vogue for the territory 
outside Milwaukee County is proposed 
by the clearance board for 1934-35. 

Exhibitors have been informed they 
must file record of their house policy 
by Aug. 15 under a revised schedule 
adopted Wednesday. They have also 
been invited to file protests against the 
contemplated plan for the state by July 
23. The board will meet the follow 
ing dav to consider them. 



Mrs. Oser Continues 
Fight on Union Funds 

Chicago, July 12. — Mrs. Gladys 
Oser, widow of Fred Oser, "rebel'' 
operator who was shot to death, ha 
been granted a change of venue on a 
order from the Appellate Court taking 
the case out of the hands of Judge 
William Lindsay. Mrs. Oser is carry- 
ing on the fight seeking an accounting 
of union funds. Her attorney charge? 
prejudice on the part of all superior 
court judges save Harry A. Lewis. 

Ralph O'Hara, who was tried for 
the crime, was acquitted by a jury on 
a self-defense plea. 



MO HON PICTURE 

DAILY 



Looking 'Em Over 



"Whom the Gods Destroy 9 ' 

{Columbia) 

In a Jannings-like role and his most important to date, Walter Con- 
nolly acquits himself with credit. 

"Whom the Gods Destroy" tells the story of a leading theatrical pro- 
ducer, who, in a moment of panic when his transatlantic boat goes 
down, achieves rescue through the use of a woman's evening cloak and 
thereafter is never successful in ridding himself of the coward's brand. 

Eventually the courage to leave the Newfoundland village patriarch 
who befriends him gains the upper hand. Back in New York, Connolly 
realizes posthumous newspaper stories crediting him with heroism 
displayed as the liner went down must inevitably lead to his uncovering 
nnd his wife's and son's disgrace. Blocked by circumstance's twist, he 
thereafter walks in the back streets of his son's life, helps him find him- 
self as a playwright and as a stage producer, but never revealing his iden- 
tity. 

As the picture closes, the wife, played by Doris Kenyon, is brought 
face to face with her husband, through the son, now grown but still un- 
aware of the truth. Husband and wife agree that the boy must never 
be told the facts, as they find a latter-day happiness predicated on occa- 
sional visits in the future. 

Connolly is the standout in point of performance. Others are ade- 
quate, but they never even approach the lead's histrionic rendition. 

Off to a slow start for several reels, "Whom the Gods Destroy" later 
gains momentum and finishes on a touching, if sentimental note. Its 
shipwreck scenes, while overlong, are among the best in some time. 

The picture is somewhat handicapped by dissolves and trick effects 
which come along frequently enough to make one wish there were less 
oi them. Generally, it is good, popular entertainment aimed at the tear 
ducts and true to its objective. Walter Lang directed. Running time, 71 
minutes. K A N N 



"Fifteen Wives" 

(Im-iiiciblc-State Rights) 

The science of physics has been consulted in "Fifteen Wives" to sup- 
ply a novel means of committing murder. For that reason chiefly this 
Invincible production makes satisfactory entertainment for smaller 
houses. The story has many humorous touches besides. 

A scoundrel married to 15 women, whom he uses for the purposes of 
blackmail when his fancy suits him, is found dead in a hotel room. Any 
one of a number of persons might have done the job. First to come 
under suspicion are three of his wives residing in the city where he 
has met his end. Then others are dragged into the picture. It turns 
out that the murderer (John Wray) is the husband of a woman whom 
the bigamist stole. 

Darned clever is the method of murder. The bluebeard receives 
a hollow glass globe, similar to the sort used by crystal-gazers, as a gift 
from an unknown person. Sealed inside is a lethal gas. Vibrations of 
a certain timbre set up by the human voice are sufficient to shatter the 
globe and cause the gas to escape. In this case the voice of Ralf Harolde, 
a performer billed as "The Electric Voice," coming over the radio, pro- 
duces the vibrations. 

The cast includes Conway Tearle, who plays the inspector of police; 
Noel Francis, Raymond Hatton, Natalie Moorhead, Oscar Apfel, Mar- 
garet Dumont, Robert Frazer, Harry Bradley. Frank Strayer directed. 
Running time, 67 minutes. 



Friday. July 13, 1934 

"ampi Names More 
To Coast Committees 

(Continued from page 1) 

(administrator Sol A. Rosenblatt. 
7hev are: 

Actors: E. J. Mannix (M-G-M), 
J. Gain (Fox), Frank O'Heron 

RKO), Nat Levine (Mascot), Sam 
5riskin (Columbia). Respective al- 
t-mates are: Fred Pelton (M-G-M). 
William Koenig (Warners), Al 
••Kaufman (Paramount) , M. H. Hoff- 
r.an (Liberty), Abraham Lehr 

Samuel Goldwyn). 
Writers: Irving Thalberg (M-G- 
Lf), Darryl Zanuck (20th Century), 
[. E. Chadwick, Henry Henigson 

Universal), Sol Wurtzel (Fox). 
Respective alternates are: Hal Wallis 

Warners). Samuel Goldwyn, Larry 

>armour (Majestic), Harry Cohn 

Columbia), Merrill Hurlburt (Para- 
nount ) . 

Victor H. Clark was named to suc- 
eed Al Berries as temporary alter- 
late for Pat Casey on the code labor 
.immittee. 

The next session will be held July 
16 with Charles L. O'Reilly as chair- 
nan. 

Attending yesterday's session were : 
Rosenblatt, Mrs. Clare Boothe Bro- 
:aw, Austin Keough, O'Reilly, Ed- 
vard Golden, R. H. Cochrane, Leslie 
rhompson, Ed Kuvkendall, J. Robert 
Rubin. W. C. Michel, Harold S. Bare- 
ord and Nathan Yamins. Bareford 
ivas chairman. 

Distributors Win 
Coast Zoning Suit 

(Continued from page 1) 

>pinion of the court dismisses Fae 
Robison's complaint and puts an end 
p the action. 

A lower court jury gave Fae Rob- 
ison a verdict of $35,336, but the 
pourt of appeals reversed the verdict 
*nd ruled that the trial judge com- 
nitted error in not directing the jury 

find a verdict for the defendants 
it the end of the case. 

The plaintiff sued the distributors 
and the Los Angeles board because 
.vhen the Seville was built just across 
:he city line from Los Angeles, it was 
n a separate zone under the Los An- 
jeles clearance and zoning plan. In 
,1925 it was put in the same zone with 
the Mesa erected that year on the 
Los Angeles side of the city line. 

The distributors contended that the 
Los Angeles clearance plan was an ad- 
visory recommendation and not legally 
binding and that Fae Robison, who 
vaited until Dec. 31, 1930, after the 
Supreme Court's decision in the ar- 
bitration case, could not maintain the 
[suit. 

Chicago Awaiting 
Reply on Clearance 

Chicago, July 12. — Petition of B. 
ii K. for modification of the clearance 
Und zoning schedule, asking increased 
protection, rested with the clearance 
ind zoning board tonight following 

1 meeting attended by 150 exhibitors. 
Ben Bartelstein headed the opposi- 
ion. A brief opposing the petition 

was read in behalf of Allied. 

The B. & K. protest places in the 
board's lap the problem of 10 cent 
louses, the question of changing 
natinee time from 6 :30 P. M. to 5 
?. M. and elimination of "early bird" 
prices at Sunday matinees. 
Speaking for the exchanges, Henry 



Herbel, Universal manager, said an 
increased matinee scale must follow 
a change such as proposed by B. & K. 
Ed Brunell, speaking for the I.T.O.A., 
attacked the plan because he said it 
allows no spot for 10-centers. 

Judge Eugene Holland sat in place 
of Hugo Friend as impartial man. 



Treanor Declines Post 

Los Angeles, July 12. — John Trea- 
nor, president of the Riverside Cement 
Co., who with Tom Nay and Carl 
Bush had been appointed business men 
to serve as alternates on the grievance 
and zoning boards, declines the post 
without furnishing a reason. 



Pittsburgh Hits at 
Giveaways and Cuts 

Pittsburgh, July 12. — Giveaways 
and cut rates have been hit in three 
recent decisions of the grievance board. 

Merchants' tickets at five and 10 
cents issued by J. L. Bush, operator 
of the Strand, Grafton, W. Va., were 
ordered stopped following a hearing 
on a complaint brought by G. E. 
Brinkman, Opera House, Grafton. 

Two complaints against cut rates 
brought by W. Finkel, operator of the 
Arcade and Colonial, Pittsburgh, one 
against the Strand, and the other 
against the Liberty resulted in cease 
and desist orders. 



13 



K. C. Test of 'Bank 
Nights' Up Next Week 



(Continued from page 1) 

for "Bank Nights," declares it is 
agreeable to a test to ascertain whether 
or not the plan violates the code. 

The Better Business Bureau is in- 
vestigating to determine if lotteries 
are involved. 



Mostly from Mrs. Baier 

Kansas City, July 12. — The old 
saw, "find the woman," has its appli- 
cation here, in that a majority of 
grievances originating from Kansas 
City has Mrs. A. Baier as the com- 
plainant. Mrs. Baier operates the 
Lindbergh, is secretary of the I. T. O. 
and has been given power of attorney 
by that body as complaint filer, so 
keeps an eye peeled for violations. 
With the two exceptions, the griev- 
ance board has decided cases filed by 
Mrs. Baier in her favor. Of eight ac- 
tions now awaiting disposition by the 
board, five were brought by vigilant 
Mrs. Baier. 



Five-Cent Shows in 
Kansas City Socked 

Kansas City, July 12. — The griev- 
ance board today outlawed children's 
matinees at five cents when it ordered 
Fox Midwest to discontinue "Br'er 
Fox Clubs" on Saturdays. The board 
issued an identical order against the 
"Big Brother Club" at the Gillham. 

Bill Perry was ordered to cease 
merchants' free shows at Coffeyville, 
Kan. A free show complaint by S. H. 
Yoffie of Appleton City, Mo., against 
S. A. Meyers of Rockville, Mo., was 
dismissed when neither party appeared. 

The board ordered the National, 
Ritz and Fox Vista, all Kansas City 
houses, to desist in spot dualing ahead 
of schedule. 



Denver Board Finds 
"Bank Nights" Unfair 

Denver, July 12. — The throwing out 
of cases against the Harry Huffman 
theatres for lack of evidence and the 
declaring "Bank Nights" to be "un- 
fair to competing exhibitors" were 
highlights of the latest meeting of the 
grievance board. 

In the Huffman case, in which eight 
theatres had filed, charging violation 
of the code in a weekly auto giveaway, 
the only evidence offered was one of 
the tickets. In spite of the fact that 
it is common knowledge how the give- 
aways were conducted, none of the 
theatre men complaining would admit 
he knew anything about it. 

Theatres involved were ordered to 
stop the practices by July 17. 

It is expected most of the managers 
will appeal. 

The Victory withdrew from partici- 
pation in all cases and complaints 
against the Paramount on its giving of 
admissions for coffee carton tops were 
withdrawn when Huffman an- 
nounced the practice had been stopped 
and would not be resumed, at least not 
for the present. 



Randell on Appeals 

Henry Randell, Brooklyn branch 
manager for Paramount, has been 
named to Campi's appeal committee. 
He is not a member of any of the 
local boards. 





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TO THE 



LEGION OF DECENCY 



FEDERAL COUNCIL OF CHURCHES 
NATIONAL JEWISH WELFARE ASS'N 
AND THE EXHIBITORS OF AMERICA 

monogramVictures 

ANNOUNCES A SPECIAL 

TRADE PREVIEW 

OF CHARLOTTE BRONTE'S 
IMMORTAL CLASSIC 



JANE 



EYRE 

FEATURING 

VIRGINIA COLIN 

BRUCE • CLIVE 



ff 



Will please in every theatre it screens. 



MONDAY — JULY 16th — 11 A. M. 

CRITERION THEATRE 

44th STREET AND BROADWAY Virginia Bruce's performance is all that 

is to be desired. The story develops at 
a ra pid pace without a dull moment 
DIRECTED BY jff I SUPERVISED BY throughout. Fortunate, indeed, will be 

CHR STY CABANNE ^Jj^BEN VERSCHLEISER ftJStf 

^-Cw^ A highly pleasing adaptation. 

ADAPTED BY ADELE C O M A N D I N I BILLBOARD, July 14th 



The Leading 

Dally _ 



Newspaper 
of the 
Motion 
Picture 
Industry 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Alert, 

Intelligent 

and 

Faithful 
Service to 
the Industry 
in All 
Branches 



VOL. 36. NO. 11 



NEW YORK, SATURDAY, JULY 14, 1934 



TEN CENTS 



Darken Less 
In Chicago 
This Season 



Cooling Systems Being 
Installed Widely 

Chicago, July 13. — Hot weather, 
ibugaboo responsible for wholesale the- 
atre closings in years past, is making 
no headway with local exhibitors this 
(year. A canvass of the situation re- 
veals there will be fewer closings in 
Chicago this summer than at any time 
in the past five years. In fact, local 
exchange managers were all but 
"stumped" when asked to estimate the 
number of closed houses. They, "just 

(Continued on page 4) 



Stabilizing Moves 
Again Fail in K. C. 

Kansas City. July 13. — The latest 
attempt to stabilize Kansas City's 
price and policy situation has met with 
failure, due to the refusal of five or 
six neighborhood exhibitors to sign 
an agreement eliminating 10-cent ad- 
missions and restricting duals to one 
a week. Jay Means, I. T. O. presi- 
dent, heading a committee of inde- 
pendents attempting to put the agree- 
nent through, says he has "shelved" 

(Continued on pane 4) 



Two K. C. Cases Hit 
Kansas Free Shows 

Kansas City, July 13. — Free 
ihows are hit in two complaints filed 
with the grievance board, which has 
•ight cases awaiting determination. 
3ther complaints have to do with 
•hildren's clubs at reduced admission, 
louble featuring ahead of the spot and 
rec passes. 



F. E. Ritter, Fox Midwest booker, 



Ivants the board to act against Wil 
|iam Perry, who puts on free shows 
n cooperation with the merchants at 

(Continued on page 4) 



Set to Begin Check 
On Free Admissions 

■ Washington, July 13. — With 503 
uestionnaires returned out of 516 sent 
ut, James W. Baldwin, Campi ex- 

' cutive officer, today was ready to be- 
in tabulations to determine the ex- 
ent of free admissions. Baldwin said 

■hat from a cursory glance at the 
eturns he believes the practice is ex- 
remely widespread and that the tabu- 
ation will show a large number of 
ree admissions weekly. 



Exhibition Active; New 
Firms, Circuits Growing 



Dover, Del., July 13. — Midhio Thea- 
tres Corp. has been chartered here to 
conduct and carry on business of the- 
atrical proprietors, etc., listing capital 
of $10,000. The incorporators are C. 
S. Peabbles, L. H. Herman and Wal- 
ter Lens of Wilmington. 

Eastern Amusement Co. has also 
been chartered with 1,000 shares, no 
par value. The incorporators are Y. 
F. Freeman, M. F. Gowthorpe and 
W. B. Cokell of New York. 



Li xcoLN, Neb., July 13. — Cornhusker 
Theatres, Inc., part of Westland The- 
atres, Inc., at Colorado Springs, Colo., 
the operating company, have purchased 
the Rialto from Calvin Bard and the 
State from G. L. Hooper and George 
Monroe. 

Bard has been active with the inde- 
pendent theatre owners who have been 
objecting to the code. 



Albany, July 13. — Two amusement 
firms have just been chartered here. 
One is Institutional Cinema Service, 

(Continued on page 4) 



Theatres in Frisco 
Delaying Bookings 

San Francisco, July 13. — All thea- 
tres are delaying film and stage book- 
ings because of the prospect of a 
strike among theatre unions. Mem- 
bers have voted to take part in the 
general strike which is planned by the 
general strategy committee of the 
labor unions now in charge of the 
waterfront workers strike. All thea- 
tres are suffering as a result of the 
long drawn out labor battle. 



Another New Title 

Hollywood, July 13. — New 
Orleans can relax. Paramount 
has given up that "Belle of 
New Orleans" title for Mae 
West's next opus. It will be 
"Belle of the Nineties." 

Uptown Manhattan may 
now protest. 



British Want 
Quota Cut on 
Native Films 



New Saenger Setup 
Hearing Is Delayed 

Submission of a plan of reorganiza- 
tion of Saenger Theatres, scheduled 
for a hearing before Referee Davis 
yesterday, was postponed to an un- 
determined date. 

The setback is a technical one made 
necessary by changes in legal docu- 
ments under the new bankruptcy laws. 



B. & K. Is Refused 
Extended Clearance 

Chicago, July 13.— B. & K.'s re- 
quest for extended protection was de- 
nied this afternoon in an official deci- 
sion by the clearance and zoning 
board. This means there will be no 
change in the releasing system. 

Despite ritywide opposition the 
board's decision may be appealed to 
Code Authority. 



By BRUCE ALLAN 

London, July 13. — The general 
council of the Cinematograph Exhibi 
tors' Ass'n. has endorsed a recom- 
mendation of the general purposes 
committee that the president of the 
Board of Trade be asked to receive a 
deputation to urge abolition of the ex 
hibitors' British quota, or its reduc 
tion to 10 per cent "until he can in- 
sure that quota quickies are replaced 
by pictures of worth while exhibition 
quality." 

This action followed a letter from 
the London branch to the council and 

(Continued on page 4) 



"U" Musical Output 
Is Being Increased 

Hollywood, July 13. — Universal 
will add several pictures to the cur- 
rent cycle of musicals with three al- 
ready nearing completion and two 
more to go into production within the 
next eight weeks. Those working are 
"Romance in the Rain," "Wake Up 
and Dream," and "Gift of Gab." In 
addition to the two other features, as 
yet untitled, Warren Doane will pro- 
duce a series of four musical shorts. 



Warners Will Close 
St. Louis Shubert 

St. Louis, July 13. — Acting on 
orders from the New York office, 
Warners have given two-week notices 
for the closing of the Shubert. Clos- 
ing of the house may help Harry 
Koplar and Allan Snyder get product 
for the Ambassador, Missouri and 
Grand Central, which were taken over 
today. 



Protestants 
Join for New 
Film Pledges 

Leaders from 25 Groups 
Outline Program 

Following a discussion by represen- 
tatives of 25 churches and other or- 
ganizations affiliated with the Federal 
Council of Churches of Christ in 
America yesterday, a form of pledge 
not to patronize objectionable pictures 
was agreed upon. 

Its form is very similar to the Le- 
gion of Decency pledge of the Cath- 
olic Church. Educational material 
and the pledges are to be mailed to 
100,000 Protestant pastors in the early- 
fall, it was stated, "as a part of the 
movement for a concerted attention to 
the motion picture problem on Sun- 
day, Oct. 21." 

The carrying out of the program, it 
was stated, will be through the cooper- 
ative action of the various national 
denominational agencies, and also by 
the city and state councils of churches. 

Promotion of the program will be 
handled by a special committee head- 
ed by Rev. Dr. Harold McAfee Rob- 
inson of Philadelphia, secretary of the 
Presbyterian Board of Christian Edu- 
cation. The executive officer will be 
Rev. Dr. Worth M. Tippy, executive 
secretary of the Federal Council's De- 
partment of Social Service. 

Rev. Dr. Samuel McCrea Cavert, 

(Continued on page 3) 



Kuykendall Takes 
Clean Film Stand 

That the M. P. T. O. A. is "entire- 
ly in accord with any person or or- 
ganization that condemns that which 
is not clean and wholesome," was 
asserted by Ed Kuykendall, presi- 
dent, in a statement issued yesterday. 

Kuykendall at the same time de- 
nounced "wholesale condemnation of 
the industry," asserting that "con- 
demning everything, whether it be 
good or bad, would not be fruitful 

(Continued on page 3) 

Local 306 Records 
Returned by Court 

Justice Dunne, in the Brooklyn Su- 
preme Court, yesterday ordered Dis- 
trict Attorney Geoghan to return rec- 
ords seized 10 days ago from Local 306. 

He remarked upon the "laudable 
zeal" in acting against the union after 
receiving complaints, but pointed out 
that constitutional guarantees had been 
violated by the seizure of the books. 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Saturday, July 14. 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 

(Registered U. S. Patent Office) 



Vol. 36 



July 14, 1934 



No. 11 




Martin Quigley 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 
MAURICE KANN 

Editor 
JAMES A. CRON 
Advertising Manager 



Published daily except Sunday and holi- 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub- 
sidiary of Quigley Publications, Inc., 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 1790 Broadway, New 
York. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Cable ad- 
dress "Quigpubco, New York." All con- 
tents copyrighted 1934 by Motion Picture 
Daily, Inc. Address all correspondence to 
the New York Office. Other Quigley pub- 
lications: MOTION PICTURE HERALD, 
BETTER THEATRES, THE MOTION 
PICTURE ALMANAC and THE CH1- 
CAGOAN. 

Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Lite 
Building, Vine and Yucca Streets, Victor 
M. Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 407 
South Dearborn Street, Edwin S. Clif- 
ford, manager; London Bureau: Remo 
House, 310 Regent St., London, W. 1, 
Bruce Allan, Representative. Cable address: 
"Ouigpubco, London"; Berlin Bureau: 
Berlin - Tempelhof, Kaiserin - Augustastrasse 
28, Joachim K. Rutenberg, Representative; 
Paris Bureau: 19, Rue de la Cour des- 
Noues, Pierre Autre, Representative; Rome 
Bureau: Viale Gorizia, Vittorio Malpassuti, 
Representative; Sydney Bureau: 102 Sus- 
sex Street, Cliff Holt, Representative; Mex- 
ico City Bureau: Apartado 269, James 
Lockhart, Representative; Glasgow Bureau: 
86 Dundrennan Road, G. Holmes, Repre- 
sentative; Budapest Bureau: 11 Olasz 
Fasor 17, Endre Hevesi, Representative. 

Entered as second class matter January 
4, 1926 at the Post Office at New York 
City, N. Y., under Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada $15 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 



"Queens Affair" to U. A. 

"The Queen's Affair," a British & 
Dominion picture produced and di- 
rected by Herbert Wilcox and star- 
ring Anna Neagle and Ferdinand 
Graavey, will be released during the 
coming season by United Artists. 

Both Neagle and Graavey were also 
starred in "Bitter Sweet." 



Shirley Wants $2,500 

Hollywood, July 13. — Shirley Tem- 
ple's father is reported to have upped 
her salary demand on Fox to $2,500 
per week. Her first contract, signed 
about a year ago, called for $150 
per week. Recently it was indicated 
that the studio had offered her $1,- 
000 a week. 



First Mundus Sale Set 

William Settos, exhibitor operating 
the Liberty in Springfield, O., has 
made the first purchase of a Mundus 
picture in his territory. Settos bought 
a group of the 27 features for imme- 
diate showing. 



"Crusaders" for DeMille 

Hollywood, July 13. — Cecil B. De- 
Mille's next will be "The Crusaders," 
from the Harold Lamb novel. It will 
be done on a pretentious scale with 
four leading men and four leading 



Twins Born to Crosbys 

Hollywood, July 13. — Bing Crosby 
and his wife, the former Dixie Lee, 
today became parents of twin boys. 



MOTION PICTURE DAILY* 
HOLLYWOOD PREVIEW 



< Purely 
Personal 



► 



"The Barretts of Wimpole Street 

(M-G-M) 

Hollywood, July 13. — As if in answer to present headlines comes this 
attraction, and attraction it is with the name values of Norma Shearer, 
Fredric March and Charles Laughton and rich romance spanning emo- 
tion's realms for sobs, smiles and heart interest. 

Briefly, the story pictures the Barrett household in London in 1845. 
Elizabeth (Miss Shearer), unable to walk, spins poetic verses which 
attract Robert Browning, played by March. Their love drama, as his- 
tory records, blocked by her father (Laughton), is recreated and con- 
summated with exquisite feeling for moderns. 

Miss Shearer, as a lady of beauty and grace, evokes deep sympathy 
as a spiritual girl thwarted by nature and a cruel father, but inspired to 
health and happiness by the poet Browning. 

March, in a fiery, romantic mood, strikes a popular chord as the 
poet unshakable in affection. Laughton, as the hateful father, gives a 
memorable performance. 

Maureen O'Sullivan wins her acting spurs as Miss Shearer's younger 
sister, while Una O'Connor is an artistic delight as Miss Shearer's maid. 
Katherine Alexander, Ralph Forbes and particularly Marion Clayton 
render nigh-perfect support. 

Sidney Franklin, plumbing unchartered regions of the heart, directs 
with deft feeling. The screen play by Ernest Vajda, Claudine West and 
Donald Ogden Stewart is a model of stage play translation. 

The production handles the sophisticated angle subtly with mass 
appeal dominant. 

Irving Thalberg's second production in two years evidences unmis- 
takingly that the initials of his name are prophetic. 

The film's box-office names, performances and romantic wholesomeness 
assure its smashing public reception. Running time, 105 minutes. 



"Hat, Coat and Glove" 

(Radio) 

Hollywood, July 13. — "Hat, Coat and Glove" starts out to become a 
somewhat confusingly dramatic romance with an eternal triangle, but 
quickly shifts into a murder mystery with cleverly worked out court- 
room situations carrying suspense and mystery to the end. 

Ricardo Cortez, in the pivotal role of the story as the defending 
attorney and estranged husband of his wife, is pleasing and sympathetic, 
while Barbara Robbins, making her screen debut here, gives a creditable 
performance as the wife. Miss Robbins fervently appeals to Cortez to 
defend her younger lover, who is accused of murdering a girl, whose 
suicide indicates murder. The boy is entangled in so much circumstan- 
tial evidence based on a hat, a coat and a glove that Cortez accedes 
to his wife's appeal on the promise that she will return to him. In 
fighting the case Cortez endangers his own life by assuming the blame, 
though through clever manipulation of defensive strategy he clears all 
and his wife returns to him convinced that their love is greater than any 
temporary affection. Much credit for originality and difference in build- 
ing the courtroom mystery must go to Frances Faragoh for his treat- 

(Continued on page 3) 



Pat he Up One on Big Board 

High Low Close 

Columbia Pictures, vtc 28 27J4 28 

Consolidated Film Industries, pfd 1354 1354 1354 

Eastman Kodak 98fg 97% 9S% 

Fox Film "A" 1254 1254 1254 

Loew's, Inc 27$i 26?4 2754 

Loew's, Inc., pfd 91 91 91 

Paramount Publix 3% 354 354 

Pathe Exchange 2 V/ A 2 

Pathe Exchange "A"... 20 \9Y% 19*6 

RKO 2'A 2 256 

Warner Bros -. 5 4M 4$4 

Technicolor Off x /a on Curb 

High Low Close 

Technicolor '. 13}4 13J4 1354 

Warner Bonds Slump l 1 /^ 

High Low Close 

General Theatre Equipment 6s '40 7y& 7]/% 7% 

Keith B. F. 6s '46 6754 6754 6754 

Loew's 6s '41. ww deb rights 101 101 101 

Paramount Broadway 554s '51 40 40 40 

Paramount F. L. 6s '47 47% 47& 47M 

Paramount Publix 554s '50 4854 4854 4854 

Warner Bros. 6s '39. wd 54 5354 5354 



Net 
Change 

- 54 
+ l A 
+ M 

— % 
+ Vi 



+1 

+ Vt 



Net 
Change 



Net 
Change 

+ l A 

— 54 



—1 

- 54 
-154 



Sales 

100 
100 
500 

1.100 

4.800 
100 

1.800 
600 
300 

1.000 
600 



Sales 

500 



Sales 

1 
1 
11 

5 
4 
5 



HARRY BUXBAUM is priding 
himself in the honors his sons are 
garnering these days. Jackie recently 
won first prize in a Cedarhurst re 
gatta, and Harry, Jr., recently took 
top honors in a Far Rockaway speed- 
boat race. 

Percy Phillipson, almost an ex- 
patriate from England what with Gen- 
eral Register business making him a 
near-permanent visitor here, was 
joined by his wife and daughter, Pam, 
yesterday. They arrived on the 
Aquiiania for the summer. 

Densmore Aaron Ross, son of 
Harry A., president of Ross Federal 
Service, shortly marries Grayce Ma- 
omi Ruland. The prospective bride- 
groom is in charge of branch opera- 
tions in his father's company. 

Slavko Vorkapich, film technician 
who worked on "Viva Villa," will 
speak on "Principles of Effective 
Cinema" at the Film and Photo 
League Monday night. 

Janet Gaynor, with her mother 
and Miss Lillian Myhre, a travel- 
ing companion, are in town. They 
will leave soon for Norway, Sweden 
and Denmark. 

Sari Maritz has been signed by 
Nat Levine, president of Mascot, for 
a role in "Crimson Romance." She 
leaves by plane tonight for the coast. 

Howard Dietz has been away from 
his desk at M-G-M due to illness. 
Probably another week will elapse be- 
fore he returns. 

Marcel Vallee, French film play- 
er, and Mrs. Vallee will sail on the 
Champla'm early tomorrow morning. 

Miriam Hopkins left for the coast 
yesterday to begin work in "The 
Richest Girl in the World." 

Lanny Ross leaves for Hollywood 
Monday for a role in Paramount's 
"College Rhythm." 

Ed Olm stead is getting an office all 
his own at Columbia. It's in prepa- 
ration now. 

Isabel Jewell, who has been in 
town on vacation, leaves today for the 
coast 



Hit Bank's Statement 

Cleveland, July 13. — Cleveland ex 
hibitors, through M. B. Horwitz, at 
tack the statement made by the Cleve 
land Trust Co. in an advertisemen 
recently that paid admissions at ap 
proximately 80 first runs and neigh- 
borhood houses in Cuyahoga Count) 
increased to a total of $3,523,025 ii 
the first five months of this year 
comparing with $2,147,876 in the samf 
period of 1933. The statement, exhib- 
itors say, may give distributors th< 
idea of boosting film rentals. 



Meins Replaces McCarei 

Hollywood. July 13. — Gus Mein; 
long associated with Hal Roach, re J 
places Ray McCarey as director o 
"Babes in Toyland." The latter failei 
to agree with the studio on the treat 
ment. This will be Meins' first fea j 
ture. 

Oregon Against Duals 

Portland, July 13. — In a signc 
questionnaire 85 per cent of Oregoi 
exhibitors have declared themselve 
opposed to double bills. 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Saturday, July 14, 1934 



3 rotestants Join for 
New Film Pledges 



(Continued from page 1) 
eneral secretary of the Federal Coun- 
\\ said the decision to circulate a 
ledge was the result of a "spon- 
meous demand." Several organiza- 
,ons are already using pledges, he 
aid. 

Dr. Cavert made it plain the cam- 
aign was not for the purpose of 
ringing about censorship. 

"Certain critics have given a false 
upression of the nature of the pres- 
nt campaign by calling it censorship," 
e said. "There is no ground what- 
ver for such an inference. Our 
ampaign is a wholly voluntary co- 
perative effort on the part of great 
umbers of men and women in the 
hurches to secure a better motion 
icture product by refusing to 'buy' 

product that they do not want. That 
; a thoroughly democratic way of 
aying to the producers they are mis- 
aken in thinking that they have been 
iving the public what it wants. If 
nis campaign fails — because of mis- 
epresentation or other reasons — cen- 
orship will almost certainly come. If 
: should come, it would be due to 
:ie motion picture industry itself." 

Those at Meeting 

Among those present were: Brigadier 
ohn J. Allan. Salvation Army; Mrs. Jesse 
1 Bader. National Council of Federated 
"hurch Women; Rev. George J. Becker, 
leformed Church in America; Rev. VV. G. 
5oyle, National Council of North Baptist 
■len; J. Henry Carpenter, Brooklyn Fed- 
ration of Churches: Rev. S. M. Cavert. 
■ederal Council of Churches; W. T. Clem- 
ns. Greater New York Federation of 
'hurches; George G. Davis, American Uni- 
arian Ass'n. ; Miss Amelia Durbin. W. C. 
P. U.: Rev. Walter M. Howlett. Greater 
sew York Federation of Churches; God- 
rey Hammond, Christian Herald; Albert 
<. Klemer, National Council Y. M. C. A. ; 
>liss Edith E. Lowry, Council of Women 
or Home Missions; F. S. Mead. The 
iumeletic Review; Rev. J. Quinter Miller, 
lartford Council of Churches; Richmond 
'. Miller. Society of Friends; Leslie B. 
Joss. Foreign Missions Conference of N. 
v.; Rev. Harry S. Myers, Northern Bap 
ist Convention; Rev. John McDowell, 
'resbyterian Church of the U. S. A.: Rev. 
"rederick B. Newell, N. Y. C. Society of 
he M. E. Church; Mrs. Elizabeth Watson 
'ollard. Epworth League and Young Peo- 
ple's Work of the M. E. Church: Mrs. 
Valter Rautenstrauch, National Council of 
<". W. C. A.; Miss Elsie G. Rodgers. Pres- 
byterian Board of Christian Education: 
.liss Henrietta Roelofs, National Board. Y. 
V. C. A.; Graham Steward, Christian 
ierald; Miss Katharine Terrill, Depart- 
ment of Social Relations, Congregational 
Education Society; Rev. Worth M. Tippv 
nd George J. Zehrung, National Council 
r. M. C. A. 

Broadcasting Started 
3y Legion in Chicago 

Chicago, July 13. — A series of 
roadcasts over local stations has been 
aunched in behalf of the Legion of 
decency campaign. Speakers include 
lev. George T. McCarthy, Bishop 
krnard J. Sheil, Rev. Louis F. 
iiroeck, William J. Campbell and 
ohn J. Collins. 

Rev. J. P. O'Reilly is chairman of 
[he radio committee. The movement 
s under the direction of Cardinal 
.lundelein and Bishop Sheil. 



[ndicates Baptists to 
loin Church Campaign 

Chicago, July 13.— J. Howard Wil- 
•iams, general secretary of the Bap- 
tist general convention of Texas, an 
organization of 3,000 churches and 
50,000 members, has indicated he will 
3ke up a campaign against indecent 



films at the Baptist World Alliance in 
Berlin Aug. 4. 

Support of the Legion of Decency 
campaign by people of all faiths is 
urged here by Dr. Robert Clements, 
president of the Chicago Church Fed- 
eration. "We hope every church will 
assist in this movement with vigor and 
enthusiasm," he states. 



Boston to Boycott 
Producer for Month 

Boston, July 13. — Boycotting for 
one month the producer of a picture 
adjudged indecent is the main feature 
of a system to be put into effect by 
the end of July bv the Boston Legion 



of Decency in its drive against objec- 
tionable films. 

The aim of the league, according to 
the Rev. Russell M. Sullivan, repre- 
sentative of Cardinal O'Connell, is 
"prevention rather than censorship." 

Presbyterians in Wash. 
Vote to Join Film Drive 

Seattle, July 13. — The Presbyter- 
ian Synod of Washington has gone 
on record at its 45th conference here 
as opposed to the industry. It de- 
nounces block booking and pledges to 
join the drive to purge the screen. 
Presbyterian congregations are being 
urged not to patronize bad films. 



3 



Kuykendall Takes 
Clean Film Stand 



(Continued from page 1) 

of results and would fall of its own 
weight of unfairness." 

"Anyone can jump on the band- 
wagon," he added. "Instead of con- 
demnation let's all of us work togeth- 
er for the accomplishment of that 
which we all desire — clean amuse- 
ment." 

Kuykendall referred to the produ- 
cers' agreement to permit cancellation 
of any film publicly adjudged unclean 
as "further conclusive proof that the 
motion picture industry as a whole 
is cooperating to the utmost in the 
campaign for entertainment in good 
taste." 

First Films to Get 
Breen's O. K. Named 

Hollywood, July 13. — The first 
batch of certificates of approval has 
been handed out by Joseph I. Breen 
in accordance with the industry's new 
plan of self-regulation. 

Features entitled to bear the offi- 
cial seal of the M. P. P. D. A. are : 

"The World Moves On," "Handy Andy," 
"Baby, Take a Bow," "She Learned About 
Sailors," "Charlie Chan's Courage." "She 
Was a Lady," "Grand Canary," "Change 
of Heart," "David Harum" (Fox): "Paris 
Interlude," "Treasure Island" (M-G-M); 
"The Defense Rests," "Beyond the Law" 
(Columbia); "Elmer and Elsie," "Ladies 
Should Listen," "The Scarlet Empress," 
"She Loves Me Not" (Paramount). 

Serials certified are "Sentenced to 
Die," "A Leap for Life," "The Night 
Attack" and "A Treacherous Am- 
bush," all Universals. 

Shorts given certificates are : two 
of the "Going Places" series and 
two "Stranger Than Fiction" issues 
(Universal); "La Cucaracha" 
(Radio) ; "Them Thar Hills" and 
three "Goofy Movies" (M-G-M) ; 
"Mike Fright" (Hal Roach). 

Massachusetts Men 
Favor Cooperation 

Boston, July 13. — Resolutions have 
been adopted by Allied Theatre 
Owners of Massachusetts putting the 
members on record in favor of clean 
pictures and saying the situation calls 
for "earnest cooperation of produ- 
cers, exhibitors and the public." 

The resolution further asks "that 
all parties interested be urged to 
bring about an early solution of this 
problem, and we, the Allied Theatres 
of Massachusetts, pledge ourselves to 
bend our every effort to effect this 
solution and will welcome and give 
cooperative consideration to any work- 
able plan which may be evolved," 



Church Crusade to 
Feature KMT A Meet 

Kansas City, July 43. — The cur- 
rent religious crusade for clean films 
is definitely scheduled for discussion 
at the 16th annual convention of the 
Kansas-Missouri Theatre Ass'n. to be 
held here Tuesday in the Variety Club 
rooms at the Muehlebach Hotel. 

"There never was more urgent need 
when exhibitors should band together 
to discuss the various matters that 
confront them," A. F. Baker, presi- 
dent, said in an association bulletin. 
"We know that many ' of you have 
stood the brunt of the drastic agitation 
launched against all branches of our 
industry." 



MOTION PICTURE DAILY* 
HOLLYWOOD PREVIEW 



(Continued from page 2) 

ment and to Worthington Minor for his direction. Those in the sup- 
porting cast are John Geal, Sarah Haden, Samuel Hinds, Dorothy Bur- 
gess and Margaret Hamilton. 

The picture should be generally accepted by adults and more so by 
that class seeking murder mystery courtroom stories salted with sophisti- 
cation. Running time, 65 minutes. 



"Elmer and Elsie" 

{Paramount) 

Hollywood, July 13. — Clean, wholesome and homespunny is this 
comedy of a piano truckman, George Bancroft, who marries a small town 
concert pianist, Frances Fuller, saves a high-priced piano from being 
smashed by falling under it, which, together with the speech his wife 
makes in his stead, elevates him to the position of foreman. 

While there is nothing startling in the film, it is suffused with bon- 
hommie, has some laugh incidents, with Bancroft contributing some 
highly amusing light comedy interludes and Roscoe Karns, his pal and 
detractor, a good foil for George. 

Although the character of Elmer is sappy at the start, Bancroft's 
personality comes through to save it. Miss Fuller is sweet as Elsie. 
George Barbier contributes a choice performance as a Babbitt factory 
owner. Gilbert Pratt's first directorial effort merits encouragement. 

If George S. Kaufman and Marc Connelly's original story kidded the 
truckman — makes good formula — the production overlooks this, playing 
it straight for homey humor and not satire. For neighborhoods, where 
contentment and comfort are glorified, this will go nicely as a pro- 
grammer. Running time, 75 minutes. 



Looking 'Em Over 



"Dancing Man" 

(Pyramid-State Rights) 

This Pyramid production suffers primarily from incoherence in its 
latter half. Everything considered, however, it is passable entertainment 
for the neighborhood trade. It has a good cast, nice settings and a yarn 
that generally holds the interest even if it does become a bit muddled 
toward the end. 

An aging man of wealth (Edmund Breese) has reason to suspect his 
youthful wife (Natalie Moorhead) of having an affair with a gigolo 
(Reginald Denny). His daughter by an earlier marriage (Judith Allen) 
falls in love with the fellow without knowing he is the man her step- 
mother is infatuated with. This causes a break between Miss Allen and 
Denny, although the latter does not care for Miss Moorhead and plans 
to turn over a new leaf by taking a job in South America. 

Following a party at Denny's studio apartment, Miss Moorhead is 
found dead. From this point on the film develops into a complicated 
murder mystery with all the customary trappings. Developments in this 
portion of the film are not always clear, but suffice it to say that Denny 
has nothing to do with the killing, although he is under suspicion. One 
of Miss Moorhead's former husbands (Edwin Maxwell) with a weakness 
for blackmailing is the guilty one. 

Also in the cast are Robert Ellis and Huntley Gordon. Al Ray 
directed. Running time, 65 minutes. 



4 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Saturday, July 14, 1934 



Exhibition Active; New 
Firms, Circuits Growing 



Darken Less 
In Chicago 
This Season 

{Continued from page 1) 
couldn't think of any offhand." Cpn- 
trarily, they could readily recite nu- 
merous houses recently reopened. 

A manufacturer of theatre cooling 
and refrigerating systems declares that 
the comfort idea has hit Chicago ex- 
hibitors as in no previous years, Es- 
saness Theatres, which have gradually 
been bringing their neighborhood 
houses into the cooled and refrigerated 
class, have put systems in seven ad- 
ditional houses this spring. 



Akron, O., July 13. — The Colonial 
(Shea), downtown deluxe house, 
which dropped first run films five 
weeks ago for a summer run of dra- 
matic stock, has gone dark until 
August 4 when it will reopen with 
first run films. 

Youngstown, July 13. — The Park, 
major downtown house, has closed for 
four weeks for renovation. The house 
will reopen early in August with 
straight film policy. For some time 
the Park has been playing dual first 
runs. 



Fort Wayne, Ind., July 13— Thea- 
tres closed in this city are the Palace, 
one of the Quimby houses; the Majes- 
tic, lately used by the Old Fort Play- 
ers; the Lincoln, which lately has 
played German and sex pictures, and 
the Transfer, downtown. The Palace 
will reopen in the early fall. 

The Strand, closed for the past six 
years, has opened and is now showing 
burlesque. 

Cincinnati, July 13.— Concurrently 
with the closing of the Grand, local 
RKO vaudefilm spot, the RKO Colo- 
nial, Dayton, went dark until August 
17. The Colonial has been playing 
five acts on a weekly basis, with the 
acts jumping to Dayton after closing 
here. 



Pittsburgh, July 13.— After stalling 
off expected closing several weeks due 
to release of several Fox pictures 
originally intended for the Alvin, 
Mort Shea's Fulton has gone dark for 
several weeks. 



Akron, O., July 13.— The Miles- 
Royal, 1,500-seat de luxe neighborhood 
spot, dark for some time, has reopened 
with a grind policy of musical tabs 
and pictures at 25 cents top. G. B. 
Odium, until recently manager of 
Constant's Palace, at Canton, O., is in 
charge. 



Alliance, O., July 13. — The Colum- 
bia, which closed June 1, will reopen 
shortly with a stage policy and first 
run films playing the last half of each 
week. The house will be dark the 
first half of the week until Sept._ 1, 
when it resumes a seven-day operating 
schedule. Ray Wallace, manager, 
also operates the Morrison and the 
Strand. 



Passaic, N. J., July 13.— The Play- 
house, dark for more than five years, 
will be reopened early in September 
by Warners. The theatre is now be- 
ing renovated and wired. 



(Continued j; 

Inc., 200 non par value shares, with 
Edward Elman, Henry H. Silverman 
and Irving G. Morris as directors. 
The other is Surf Avenue Enter- 
prises, Inc. Incorporators are David 
N. Goldman, Bernard R. Gogel and 
Florence S. Epstyne. 



Dover, Del., July 13.— A. H. Woods, 
Ltd., has been chartered here as a 
theatre enterprise. The incorporators 
are Emile Bonnot, F. F. Kane and 
J. A. Lauridsen of New York City. 



Norfolk, July 13. — James S. Hodges 
heads the new States Shows, Inc., just 
chartered with capitalization of $10,000 
to operate theatres. Other officers are : 
George Peek, vice-president ; Alice 
Howard, treasurer, and W. H. Star- 
key, secretary. 



Cincinnati, July 13. — Contracts 
have been awarded for rebuilding the 
Hippodrome, a unit of the Frankel 
Amusement Enterprises, located at 
Newport, Ky., across the river from 
here. The house was destroyed by 
fire several months ago. It is planned 
to have the building ready in October. 



New Orleans, July 13. — William 
Koll has opened a tent theatre in 
Houma in opposition to the Grand. 
The idea is mostly an experiment. 
According to Koll, if it is successful 
similar ventures may be installed 
elsewhere. 



Stabilizing Moves 
Again Fail in K. C. 

(Continued from page 1) 

the plan but has not abandoned it en- 
tirely. 

In the absence of a voluntary agree- 
ment, it is felt that the new clear- 
ance schedule and contract stipula- 
tions for the new season will bring 
about the reforms sought. 

Dissenters are exhibitors who 
charge 10 cents two or more nights 
a week. They declare themselves 
willing to establish a minimum of 15 
cents provided competitive houses in 
the same zone will set their scales on 
a higher level. No agreement appar- 
ently can be reached on that score. 

Two K. C. Cases Hit 
Kansas Free Shows 

(Continued from page 1) 

Coffeyville, Kan. Violation of the non- 
theatrical clauses of the code is al- 
leged. Perry gets his film from the 
Silent Film Exchange of Kansas City 
and American Distributors Corp. of 
Omaha, according to the complaint. 

The second free show action has 
been brought by S. H. Yoffie, exhib- 
itor in Appleton City, Mo., who 
charges S. A. Myers, exhibitor of 
Rockville, Mo., with running free 
shows in Appleton City. The perfor- 
mances are staged by the merchants 
in the local park. Consolidated Film 
Distributors of Kansas City is cited 
as furnishing film. 

Mrs. A. Baier of the Lindberg, au- 
thorized by the I. T. O. to file griev- 



rom page 1 ) 

Denver, July 13. — The Fox Isis, 10 
and 15-cent grind, has blossomed out 
in new dress — remodeled, redecorated, 
new marquee, seats and with organ 
overhauled. About $15,000 was spent. 



Silver City, N. M., July 13. — A 
new theatre, as yet unnamed, will open 
here about Aug. 15. Eddie Ward, 
mayor and owner, also has the other 
theatre here, both of which are affili- 
ated with the Gibraltar group, with 
headquarters in Denver. The house 
will seat 400. 



New Orleans, July 13. — Max Heine 
has organized the Avenue Theatre 
Corp., which is now operating the 
Avenue. The new company has a 
lease ending May 14, 1938, with an 
option ot purchase within six months 
for $27,500. 



South Bend, July 13. — Chicago 
bondholders represented by James 
Kelly bid in the Christman Building, 
which houses the Colfax Theatre, for 
a sum sufficient to satisfy a judgment 
totalling $468,020.05. Fixtures in the 
theatre were included in the sale. 



Grinnell, la., July 13. — The Iowa 
and Strand have been merged under 
the Strand Corp. William Mart, 
manager, will continue present poli- 
cies at both houses. Dick Phillips, 
manager of the Iowa, becomes travel- 
ing manager for Central States 
Theatres. 



ances, has brought action against the 
Linwood, Gladstone, Isis, Waldo and 
other Fox Midwest houses on a 
charge of reduced admission by ad- 
mitting members of the Br'er Fox 
clubs for five cents at Saturday after- 
noon matinees, whereas the minimum 
established by zoning and clearance is 
10 cents. She filed a similar com- 
plaint against R. R. Rhoades, Gillham 
Theatre, where children are admitted 
for a nickel at Big Brother club 
shows. 

Other complaints filed by Mrs. 
Baier are against Emanuel Rolsky, 
National, double featuring 14 days 
ahead of regular spot ; Fox Vista, dual 
bill at 15 cents ahead of schedule; 
C. A. Schultz, operating the Mokan, 
free passes in violation of the code. 

Another case pending is against 
H. H. Barrett, Ritz, charging re- 
duced admission and premature ad- 
vertising by running a Radio pic- 
ture at 10 cents 21 days ahead of the 
spot and on a double bill which would 
set it back further. The complaint 
was filed by the Fox Vista. 

The grievance board has gone on 
-i cr-hedule of meetings every 10 days 



Liberty Closing Season 

Hollywood, July 13. — Having com- 
pleted "School for Girls," Liberty 
shortly starts work on "Without Chil- 
dren," last of the eight planned for the 
current season. 



Marin Signed by M-G-M 

Hollywood, July 13. — Edwin Miarin, 
who has just completed "Paris Inter- 
lude" for M-G-M, has signed a new 
long-term contract with the company. 



British Want 
Quota Cut on 
Native Films 



(Continued from page 1) 

strong resolutions from the Notts, 
Derby and West Lancashire branches. 

This is another angle of the agita- 
tion against cheap American quota 
pictures made here that first found 
public expression at the Blackpool 
convention. 

At present British exhibitors are 
compelled to show 12^4 per cent of 
British pictures. They are actually 
showing 23.7 per cent. This uses up 
about half the British product avail- 
able. 

American quota pictures — l7 J /2 per 
cent at present — are produced in Eng- 
land at a cost of $25,000 to $30,000, 
and it is estimated that half the Brit- 
ish production as a result is worthless 
for exhibition purposes. The present 
move of the C. E. A. is another phase 
of the move to secure some kind of a 
quality guarantee. 

Pikeville Buying 
Case Is Dismissed 

Cincinnati, July 13. — The griev- 
ance board has ruled that G. C. Scott, 
Pikeville, Ky., was not overbuying for 
the Liberty under his policy of seven 
weekly changes. Complainant was 
Pikeville Amusement Co., operating 
the Weddington. Evidence showed that 
Scott was playing one picture for two 
days a week, and using double features 
one day every week to take care of the 
product. Complainant's interests were 
not considered jeopardized when it was 
brought out that he had the privilege 
of buying other product on accounts 
open in his town, of which he had not 
availed himself. 

The board decided it was without 
jurisdiction in the case of Forest 
Amusement Co., asking cancellations 
under a contract with Paramount, for 
the Forest and Nordland, neighbor- 
hoods, on films termed objectionable 
by the Legion of Decency. 

Complaint Aimed at 
New House Dropped 

Omaha, July 13. — The complaint of 
Owen Frederick, operator of the Cal 
at W ood River, Neb., against John 
Lyhane, in an effort to prevent the 
latter from opening a theatre in Wood 
River, has been dismissed by the griev- 
ance board on the ground the board 
lacked authority. 

A. Beams of Red Cloud, Neb., has 
been ordered to end merchants' coupon 
tickets and cut rate prices. The com- 
plaint was filed by Gladys McArdle of 
Lebanon, Kan., just across the line 
from the Nebraska town. 



Off to South Seas 

Hollywood, July 13. — M-G-M will 
send a troupe to the South Seas to 
shoot background shots for "Mutiny 
on the Bounty" which Frank Lloyd 
will direct. He will also seek a native 
Polynesian for the feminine lead. 



Warner Title Is Changed 

Warners have changed the title of 
"A Lady Surrenders" to "Desirable." 



Alert, 

Intelligent 

and 

Faithful 
Service to 
the Industry 
in All 
Branches 



The Leading 
Daily 

Newspaper 

i « if 
of the I ^ 

Motion 

Picture 

Industry 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



VOL. 36. NO. 12 NEW YORK, MONDAY, JULY 16, 1934 



Myers Calls 
Cancellation 
"Red Herring" 

Legion Lists Should Be 
Criterion, He Says 

Washington. July 15.— Abram F. 
Myers, general counsel for Allied, calls 
the privilege of cancellation of pic- 
tures to which public groups object 
"a red herring," and "so vague as to 
be meaningless." 

"There are thousands of commun- 
ities where there are no definite or- 
ganizations, but where a large propor- 
tion of the population is governed in 
rnovie attendance by the lists of con- 
demned pictures promulgated by na- 
tional and state groups not represented 
in such communities," the state nent 
reads. "Had Mr. Hays desired to 

(Continued on paqc 6) 

Samuelson May Quit 
Jersey Leadership 

Because of the amount of work the 
presidency of the national Allied or- 
ganization has piled on him, Sidney 
Savuelson may decline to run again 
as head of the New Jersey unit, which 
holds its election at the annual con 
vention Aug. 22-24 in Atlantic Citv. 

Samuelson says he hasn't decided 
yet whether he will want to continue 
as New Jersey leader, but expects 
to come to a definite decision within 
the next few weeks. 

In the event he refuses to be re- 
nominated, it is most likely Julius 
(Continued on pane 6) 

Ky. Exhibitors Plan 
Fight to Absorb Tax 

Fran kfort, July 15. — Kentucky ex- 
hibitors, faced with loss of business 
through adoption of the sales tax, 
which went into effect July 1, will 
make a determined fight to be per- 
mitted to absorb the impost themselves 
instead of passing it on to the public. 
The law specifically provides that the 
tax must be paid by the purchaser 
and specifies penalties for anyone who 
attempts to pay the tax himself. 

Fox's Counterclaims 
Overruled by Court 

Counterclaims filed by William Fox 
against Fox Theatres Corp., when he 
was sued some time ago bv the re- 
ceivers for a sum totaling $2,066,082. 
'have been thrown out by decision of 
the Appellate Division of the Supreme 
j Court. 

The court ruled that if the claims 

(Continued on pac/e 2) 



Various Para. 
Groups Near 
Understanding 

Are Reported Closer on 
Reorganization Views 

Various groups interested in Para- 
mount's reorganization and emergence 
of the company from the bankruptcy 
courts were reported proceeding in 
closer understanding than has pre- 
vailed for some time on Saturday. 

This was construed not necessarily 
as indicating the company was as yet 
ready to move for final reorganization, 
but rather is indicative of a desire for 
as much cooperation as may be ef- 
fected in view of conflicting points of 
view as against adoption of obstruc- 
tionist tactics. 

One source, close to the situation, 
summed it up in this fashion : 

"I think it entirely fair to say that 
bondholders, debenture holders and 
common stockholders now lean toward 
a pretty well established conviction 
that there is no birthday cake to be 

(Continued on pane 4) 



No Para. Committee 
Meets Planned Now 

No immediate meetings of Para- 
mount's theatre advisory committees 
are planned, it was said Saturday, the 
last session having been held on the 
coast during Paramount's annual sales 
convention. 

The presence of N. L. Nathanson, 
Barney Balaban. Martin Mullin and 
Sam Pinanski does not have to do 
with theatre advisory sessions, it was 
asserted. 



Cleveland Pleased 
By Week of Singles 

Cleveland, July 15. — Cleveland ex- 
hibitors are delighted with the first 
week's business under a single feature 
standard. Subsequent run houses, 
which anticipated a sudden drop in 

(Continued on page 2) 



A Long Time 

Cincinnati, July 15. — A local 
exhibitor and branch man- 
ager were discussing the film 
and other codes. 

Said the exhibitor: 

"Don't expect too much of 
any code. Think how long it 
is taking to put over the very 
simple one Moses presented." 



Campi Orders 
Quick Action 
On Clearance 



Campi has put its foot down on lo- 
cal clearance and zoning boards, or- 
dering members to immediately dispose 
of all pending protests on current and 
new schedules filed before July 1. 

The order came as a result of com- 
plaints of various distributors who 
claim that holding up of the schedules 
has retarded the sales season. 

Of the 31 exchange centers, only 
17 have been heard from. These key 
spots have sent in schedules for 35 
cities in their territories. 

While no time limit is given to the 
hearing of the pending protests, the 
order states that appeals must be 
made five days after decisions are 
handed down and schedules pub- 
lished. BoaHs will not hear com- 
plaints filed after July 1. 

With the declaration tint no further 
extension from the Julv 1 deadline 
will be granted, Campi faces many 
complaints from exhibitors whose 
(Continued on page 6) 

FWC Files Protest 
On Coast Clearance 

Los Angeles, July 15 — After play- 
ing an important part in the promul- 
gation of the local clearance and zon- 
ing schedule, Fox West Coast has 
protested to Campi that it wants to 
continue schedules as they are now 
constituted, including duals. 

Campi has heard the protest, but no 
action has been taken. 



TEN CENTS 



Foreign Film 
To Get Close 
Code Scrutiny 



Imports, Eastern Output 
Must Get Hart O. K. 



Foreign product, annexed by Hays 
distributor-members for this market, 
is to be submitted to the reinforced 
Production Code Administration 
which becomes operative at midnight 
tonight. 

Vincent G. Hart, for several years 
handling the eastern administration of 
the production code, will be in charge, 
cloaked with powers identical with 
those conferred upon Joseph I. Breen, 
Production Code Administrator, by 
resolution of the Hays board of direc- 
tors on June 13, although Hart is an- 
swerable to Breen. 

All eastern production, whether fea- 
ture or shorts, will be submitted to 
Hart in script form prior to the 
cranking of a camera. Where, it is 

(Continued on page 6) 



Liberties Union in 
Move on Film Drive 

Organizations fighting objectionable 
pictures were called upon in a state- 
ment issued yesterday after a meet- 
ing of the National Council on Free- 
dom from Censorship, unit of the 
American Civil Liberties Union, to 
clarify their attitude toward state and 
Federal censorship. Copies of the 
statement were sent to Cardinal Hayes, 
the Legion of Decency, the M. P. 
Research Council and other groups. 

"The council feels," says the state- 
ment, "that the agitation against the 
movies has created a large measure 
of confusion in the public mind and 
that the organizations which have en- 
gendered the publicity owe it to the 

(Continued on page 6) 



Censors So Severe, 
Kansas Clergy Calm 

Kansas City, July 15. — The work 
of the Kansas censors has been so ef- 
ficient that a church campaign against 
indecent films in Kansas does not ap- 
pear to be necessary, Miss Hazel 
Myers, board chairman, says she. has 
been informed by persons high in 
church circles. 

Miss Myers explained religious 
leaders in Kansas feel the censors can 
be depended upon to keep the state's 
screens free from offensiveness and 
for that reason the current agitation 
within the state is to be moderate. 
Bishop Tief of the Catholic diocese 
(Continued on page 6) 



127 Houses in 22 Cities 
Report $1,173,017 Gross 

One hundred and twenty-seven kev citv houses in 22 cities report a total 
gross of $1,173,017 for the theatre week ending June 21-22. This compares 
with $1,111,432 for 125 houses covering the previous seven-day period. 

Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Los Angeles 
Minneapolis, Omaha, Philadelphia, San Francisco, St. Paul, Seattle and 

(Continued on page 4) 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Monday, July 16, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 

(Registered U. S. Patent Office) 



Vol. 36 



July 16, 1934 



No. 12 




Martin Quigley 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 
MAURICE KANN mo 

Editor 
JAMES A. CRON 
Advertising Manager 



Published daily except Sunday and holi 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub 
sidiary of Quigley Publications, Inc.. 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 1790 Broadway, New 
York. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Cable ad 
dress "Quigpubco, New York." All con- 
tents copyrighted 1934 by Motion Pictuie 
Daily, Inc. Address all correspondence to 
the New York Office. Other Quigley pub 
lications: MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 
BETTER THEATRES, THE MOTION 
PICTURE ALMANAC and THE CHI 
CAGOAN. 

Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Life 
Building, Vine and Yucca Streets, Victor 
M. Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 407 
South Dearborn Street, Edwin S. Clif 
ford, manager; London Bureau: Remo 
House, 310 Regent St., London, W. 1, 
Bruce Allan, Representative. Cable address: 
"Quigpubco, London"; Berlin Bureau 
Berlin - Tempelhof , Kaiserin - Augustastrasse 
28, Joachim K. Rutenberg, Representative; 
Paris Bureau: 19, Rue de la Cour des 
Noues, Pierre Autre, Representative; Rome 
Bureau: Viale Gorizia, Vittorio Malpassuti . 
Representative; Sydney Bureau: 102 Sus- 
sex Street, Cliff Holt, Representative; Mex 
ico City Bureau: Apartado 269, Jamc> 
l.ockhart. Representative; Glasgow Bureau 
86 Dundrennan Road, G. Holmes, Repre 
sentative; Budapest Bureau: 11 Olasz 
Fasor 17, Endre Hevesi, Representative. 

Entered as second class matter Januar> 
4, 1926 at the Post Office at New York 
City, N. Y., under Act of March 3, 1879 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada $15 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 



< Purely 
Personal ► 

AL CHRISTIE' starts production 
today at the Eastern Service 
Studios on "Bless You," first of Edu- 
cational's new series of musical come- 
dies. 

Ed Kuykendall, president of the 
M.P.T.O.A., plans to leave for his 
home town on Wednesday. 

Harold Rodner is back from Sara- 
raac on an NVA mission. 



IATSE Holds Coleman 

Columbus, July IS. — At the annual 
convention of the I.A.T.S.E., held 
here in conjunction with the con- 
vention of the Ohio Federation of La- 
bor, Harry E. Coleman was re-elected 
executive secretary. The following 
were named to the executive board : 
Larry Buck, Columbus, chairman : 
Russell Sheats, Toledo; R. W. Mills, 
Springfield ; Gene Lauri, Cincinnati ; 
W. W. Hoffebert, Dayton ; Charles 
Schumacher, Canton, and T. A. Can- 
iff, Steubenville. 

E. J. Tinney, Youngstown, was in 
charge of the session. 



Willis M. Beale Dead 

Omaha, July IS.— Willis M. Beale, 
Warner booker, is dead here. He had 
been suffering from a throat ailment 
that had kept him from work two 
months. He is survived by his wife. 



Insiders' Outlook 



pARAMOUNT and Metro have 
two troublesome women on 
their hands. At Paramount, it's 
a gal named Mae West. At Me- 
tro, a more platinum blonde 
named Jean Harlow. Both pro- 
ducers are thinking hard what 
they can do about them in the 
light of the church movement. 
Take either one or both, if you 
like, and imagine La West or 
La Harlow in a sweet and virgin- 
al "Little Women" type of role. 
It would be funny. Their pro- 
ducers recognize in these two 
players the public's association 
with well-defined characteriza- 
tions. They argue tickets are 
bought on that basis, but it's a 
basis which church forces no like. 
What to do about them is major 
and tough to solve. . . . 

T 

Friendly pressure from several 
sources influenced Charles E. 
Richardson to reconsider that 
permanent appointment to one of 
three Paramount trusteeships. He 
got it, of course, the other day. 
Ran the arguments which weaned 
him away from withdrawal : "The 
reorganization is proceeding nice- 
ly now. If you step out and a 
stranger to what has been trans- 
piring comes in, the consequent 
delay is apt to be unfortunate." 
Richardson stayed. . . 

T 

Pessimistic note on an other- 
wise pleasant afternoon : The 
Cleveland ban on duals is rocky 
already. The boys there, nice and 
neighborly like, are sufficiently 
suspicious of each other to make 
trouble not so far removed. First 
reaction of the larger operators 
there was delight that duals had 
been massacred. The little fel- 
lows are throwing the squawks. 
Chief trouble : Trying to keep 90- 
odd exhibitors, especially Cleve- 
land exhibitors, looking at the 
same problem through the same 
eyes. . . 

▼ 

"Joan of Arc" may be made for 
next season by Radio with La 
Hepburn in the title spot, but 
again it may not be. One certain 
fact about it is that "The Little 



Minister" will be her first, not 
the dramatic story of the Maid 
of Orleans. RKO asserts quite 
positively church opinion, or fear 
of it, had nothing at all to do 
with the case. Thornton Wilder, 
author of "The Bridge of San 
Luis Rey," did one treatment. So 
did several others, each seeking 
escape from the stormy waters 
that swirl around the French and 
English, as well as varying his- 
torical points of view on the sub- 
ject matter. The color splash in 
Radio's product book having to 
do with the picture has been blot- 
ted out and the space diverted to 
other matters. That may or not 
be the determining factor, but 
there you have it. . . 

▼ 

Two pictures, made an ocean 
and a continent apart but deal- 
ing with the same central char- 
acter, are directing the attention 
of producers toward a more care- 
ful sifting of story rights in the 
future. Along about the time 
Darryl Zanuck finished the new 
Colman, "Bulldog Drummond 
Strikes Back," in Hollywood, 
John Maxwell's British Interna- 
tional had completed "The Return 
of Bulldog Drummond" in Lon- 
don. In this market where Col- 
man's presence in any picture 
means something, the 20th Cen- 
tury attraction naturally would 
lead over the other. Yet release 
of the British picture at or about 
the same time, and perhaps day 
and date in competitive theatres, 
certainly would leave its mark. 
This is one reason why Mundus, 
new U. A. distributing subsid- 
iary, made a deal for the British 
film with Lou Metzger. All of 
this is influencing producing cir- 
cles to exercise additional care in 
the purchase of stories built 
around the same central hero. . . 
T 

He was objecting to his parts. 
His studio figured it was time to 
turn disciplinarian and farmed 
him to a smaller producer. No 
one was particularly excited 
about the loan except the director 
who got this player. Came the 
time when the film was com- 



Par amount Up y 2 on Big Board 



High 

Consolidated Film Industries, pfd I3y 2 

Eastman Kodak 99 

Fox Film "A" 12^ 

Loew's, Inc 28 

Paramount, cts 35^ 

Pathe Exchange 2 

Warner Bros VIA 



Net 



Low 


Close 


Change 


Sales 




WA 




200 


98'4 


99 


+ % 


300 


12Vz 


Ui/i 


+ % 


200 


2754 


27 


+ V2 


500 


35i 


3$* 


+ V2 


800 


2 


2 




200 


4J4 


4H 




1,300 



Technicolor Gains y 8 on Curb 



Technicolor 



High 

• 13M 



Low 

13^ 



Net 

Close Change 

133* + Vi 



Trading Light in Bond Market 



High 

Pathe 7s '37 ww 991^ 

Warner Bros. 6s '39 wd 53.54 



Low 

99}4 
53% 



Net 
Close Change 

99K 

5354 - Ya 



Sales 

400 



Sales 

4 
6 



pleted and out it went to become 
one of the biggest draws of the 
season ; to create new fans for 
the player ; to deluge his contract 
studio with requests for this 
thespian in more of the same 
type of roles. The player: ( lark 
Gable. The disciplining studio: 
M-G-M. The lucky director: 
Frank Capra. The fortunate stu- 
dio : Columbia. The attraction, 
and a real one: "It Happened 
One Night." . . . 

T 

Are they smiling happily over 
at Universal? Last year, the 
Music Hall booked in four. This 
year, the new contract calls for 
10. . . . Watch for interesting 
changes in the Greater New York 
film buy for next season. Upsets 
are on the way which won't make 
the situation between Loew's and 
RKO any friendlier. . . W'alter 
Wanger, back from the Conti- 
nent, found his trip interesting 
and worthwhile. He takes this 
word of advice to Hollywood and 
its producers : "Travel and see 
the world before boring it." . . . 

KANN 



Cleveland Pleased 
By Week of Singles 

(Continued from page 1) 

attendance due to the shortened pro- 
gram, express satisfaction because of 
the varied program. 

The only kicks reported from a 
neighborhood house were on the 
ground that the feature shown was 
not suitable to that particular neigh- 
borhood. In that case, the opinion 
was expressed, business could have 
been saved by playing another feature 
with it, provided it was suitable. 



Fox's Counterclaims 
Overruled by Court 

(Continued from page 1) 

were allowed to prevail he would be 
in the position of a preferred creditor 
"to the detriment of other creditors."- 

The decision is a reversal of Su- 
preme Court Justice Peter P. Smith, 
who allowed the first counterclaim to 
stand and sustains his ruling in dis- 
missing two other claims. 



Harry Sherman Resigns 

Harry Sherman has resigned as 
president of Local 306, and Harland 
Holmden, third vice-president of the 
I.A.T.S.E., has been placed in charge. 

Whether or not other officers of 
the local will hold their posts was not 
announced, and their future status 
could not be determined. 

An election to pick a successor to 
Sherman is planned in the near future. 



Cincy Strand to Singles 

Cincinnati, July IS. — The Strand, 
downtown independent, after three 
weeks of double featuring. has 
switched to single features, playing 
second runs for a full week. Prices 
of 15 cents for matinee and 15 and 
20 cents evenings, recently set, re- 
main the same. 



Webb, Ray Are in Town 

Harry Webb and Bernard B. Rav, 
producers of the Tom Tyler. Jack 
Perrin and Bud 'n' Ben series, are in 
New York for about a week on state 
right deals. 






It's cause for rejoicing when show- 
men get together and kick out dat 
ole debbil double bill. Educational 
steps up its production budget and 
the short subjects step out for finer 
entertainment all through the show. 



Here's dog-gone good news for the exhibitors who are 
just going back to the ideal form of varied picture 
program . . . and for the wise ones who never left it . . . 

ERNEST TRUEX 

in 

Dog-gone Babies 

From the play "Love and Babies'" by Herbert P. McCormack 
Adapted by William Watson and Art Jarrett 
Produced by Al Christie 

Tom Patricola and Buster West will soon be on parade with "Hi. Hi, 
Sailor"*; Busier KealOII with another to duplicate the hits he has made in 
••The Gold Ghost*' and "Allez Oop!" and Bing Crosby singing the 
songs that made him famous in four short subject specials. 



4 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Monday, July 16, 1934 



127 Houses in 22 Cities 
Report $1,173,017 Gross 



(Continued from paqe 1) 

Washington reported gains. These points report a drop in the current com- 
pilation over the last : Denver, New York, Pittsburgh, Portland and 
Providence. 

Comparative grosses for the latest available periods : 



Week Ending Week Ending 

June 21-22 June 14-15 



No. Theatres Gross No. Theatres Gross 



Boston 6 


$105,000 


6 




$98,000 


Buffalo 6 


39,900 


5 




33,400 




126,500 


7 




100,000 


Cleveland 6 


37,500 


6 




33,400 




23,700 


5 




24,000 


Detroit 4 


54,500 


4 




50,800 




16,250 


4 




14,000 


Kansas City 5 


51,300 


5 




31,000 


Los Angeles 8 


72,192 


8 




72,016 


Minneapolis 6 


28,250 


6 




25,500 




39,000 


4 




32,000 


New York 11 


221,025 


11 




243,416 


Oklahoma City 4 


14,100 


4 




14,100 




27,050 


4 




23,800 


Philadelphia 7 


60,900 


7 




56,000 


Pittsburgh 5 


36,600 


5 




38,600 




20,900 


6 




24,400 


Providence 6 


25,000 


6 




33,000 


San Francisco .... 6 


68,000 


6 




59,700 


St. Paul 4 


15,550 


4 




15,500 


Seattle 6 


26,900 


6 




26,800 


Washington 6 


62,900 


6 




62,000 




127 


$1,173,017 


125 


$1,111,432 


Comparative grosses compiled 


from day-to-day 


reports for 39 


weeks 


show this : 










Week Ending 


Theatres 




Grosses 




September 29-30, 1933 


135 




$1,342,710 






141 




1,417,886 




October 13-14 


143 




1,544",838 




October 20-21 


141 




1,581,308 




October 27-28 


143 




1,509,422 






142 




1,500.740 




November 10-11 


141 




1,379,560 






144 




1,375,132 




November 24-25 


141 




1,431,209 




December 1-2 


141 




1,418,753 






142 




1,558,832 






139 




1,221,032 




December 22-23 


133 




1,071,457 




December 29-30 


138 




1,433,289 




Tanuary 5-6, 1934 


136 




1,714,824 




January 12-13 


138 




1,435,649 




January 19-20 


136 




1,305,267 






135 




1,348,517 






135 




1,338,371 




February 9-10 


135 




1,270,345 






136 




1,317,011 






136 




1,316,421 




March 2-3 • 


135 




1,350,548 




March 9-10 


134 




1,378,865 




March 16-17 


133 




1,302,020 






128 




1,291,695 




March 30-31 


134 




1,247,322 




April 6-7 


135 




1,571,695 




April 13-14 


132 




1,360,061 




April 20-21 


135 




1,342,151 




April 27-28 • 


133 




1,307,764 




May 3-4 


134 




1,256,631 




May 10-11 


133 




1,250,702 




May 17-18 


133 




1,260,655 




May 24-25 


133 




1,209,381 




May 31-June 1 


132 




1,209,113 




June 7-8 


128 




1.123,764 




June 14-15 


125 




1,111,432 




June 21-22 


127 




1.173.017 




(Copyright, 


1934, Quigley Publications) 







Various Para. 
Groups Near 
Understanding 



(Continued from page 1) 

cut up in huge slices and that, avoid- 
ance of disturbances in advancing 
plans for reorganization is to be de- 
sired from all angles." 

Kuhn, Loeb & Co. now have assem- 
bled in rough form a wide array of 
statistics bearing on reorganization. 
In about 10 days, the expectation is 
their plan, seen principally through 
the eyes of the bondholders naturally, 
will be ready for discussion. In the 
meantime, the stockholders' interests, 
formidable in that over 3,000,000 
shares of Paramount common are out- 
standing, are being developed through 
an analysis being carried forward by 
Coverdale and Colpitts. 

No formal presentation of any plan 
is viewed as possible until various 
groups reach a basis of understanding. 
This is the foundation for the antici- 
pation that representatives of bond- 
holders and stockholders must some- 
where along the line get together and 
mutually arrive at a basis of under- 
standing. 

It is held that considerable depends 
on how far apart the preliminary 
plans drawn, up by each group prove 
to be. Skirmishing and jockeying for 
position are regarded as an inevitable 
development in negotiations leading to 
a rapprochement. 

These negotiations are apt to spread 
over a period of several months. 



Omaha Houses Gain 
In Spite of Heat 

Omaha, July 15. — Extreme heat 
failed to hurt business last week. All 
houses were at par or above, and the 
Brandeis reached $4,250, over normal 
by $450, on "Cockeyed Cavaliers" and 
"Let's Try Again." 

The world was $700 up at $4,300 
on "He Was Her Man" and "Call It 
Luck." 

Total first run business was $23,- 
250. Average is $21,250. 
Estimated takings : 

Week Ending July 11: 

"SHOOT THE WORKS" (Para.) 

PARAMOUNT— (2,900), 25c-40c, 8 days. 
Stage: Ann Ronnell. Gross: $7,700. (Aver- 
age, $7,250) 

"COCKEYED CAVALIERS" (Radio) 
"LET'S TRY AGAIN" (Radio) 

BRANDEIS— (1,500), 20c-25c-35c, 7 days. 
Gross: $4,250. (Average, $3,800) 

Week Ending July 12: 

"CATHERINE THE GREAT" (U. A.) 
"PRIVATE SCANDAL" (Para.) 

OR PHEUM— (3,000), 25e-35c-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $7,000. (Average, $7,000) 

"HE WAS HER MAN" (Warners) 
"CALL IT LUCK" (Fox) 

WORLD— (2,200), 25c-35c, 7 days. Gross: 
$4,300. (Average, $3,500) 



Chicago Palace Slashes 

Chicago, July 15. — RKO with last 
week's program slashed prices at the 
Palace. The old scale of 35c-50c- 
75c became 25c-35c-55c, the latter 
price including tax. There will be 
no change in policy. 



St. Louis Boat Back 

St. Louis, July 15. — Showboat 
competition is in sight again this year. 
The Board of Public Service has 



again refused a permit for the boat to 
tie up at the foot of Pine St., but in 
previous years this has had no effect. 
Last year the boat operated in the 



Missouri River near the St. Charles, 
Mo., bridge. The year before it was 
at Musick's Ferry, both within con- 
venient motoring distance. 



"Boy," Show, 
With $19,000 
Tops Chicago 



Chicago, July 15. — "Laughing Boy" 
and a stage show with Ted Cook's 
band was the only program in the 
Loop to top average. It ran up to 
$19,000 at the Oriental, over par by 
$3,000. 

Patronage slipped sharply else- 
where, due to weak programs. Local 
opinion is that the fair is failing to 
draw. Others say the theatres are 
feeling the effects of the church 
crusade. 

Total first run business was 
$110,000. Average is $127,600. 
Estimated takings : 

Week Ending July 12: 

"BABY TAKE A BOW" (Fox) 

CHICAGO— (4.000), 35c-50c-68c, 7 days. 
Stage: Mitzi May fair, Tito Guizar. Fred 
Sanborn & Co., Lowe. BernofT & Wensley. 
Gross: S34.000. (Average, $34,600) 

"LAUGHING BOY" (M-G-M) 

ORIENTAL— (3,940), 25c-40c, 7 days. 
Stage: Bowery Follies with Beef Trust 
Girls, Ted Cook band. Gross: $19,000. 
(Average, $15,000) 

Week Ending July 10: 

"OPERATOR 13" (M-G-M) 

UNITED ARTISTS — (1,700), 30c-40c-60c, 
7 days. 3rd week. Gross: $10,000. (Aver- 
age. $17,000) 

Week Ending July 12 

"I GIVE MY LOVE" (Univ.) 

PALACE— (2,509), 35c-50c-75c, 7 days. 
Stage: Billy House, Jack Whiting, Jeanie 
Lang. Maria Gambarelli. Gross: $18,000. 
(Average, $22,000) 

Week Ending July 13: 

"SHE LEARNED ABOUT SAILORS" 
(Fox) 

MCVICKERS— (2,284), 30c-40c-60c. 7 days. 
Gross: $8,000. (Average, $13,000) 

Week Ending July 12: 

"SHOOT THE WORKS" (Para.) 

ROOSEVELT— (1.591), 25c-35c-50c, 7 days, 
2nd Loop week. Gross: $7,000. (Average, 

$11,000) 

Week Ending July 14: 

"SISTERS UNDER THE SKIN" (Col.) 

STATE-LAKE — (2,776). 20c-25c-35c, 7 
days. Stage: WLS Roundup. Gross: 
$13,500. (Average, '$15,000; 



Providence Slump 
Gains, Takes Fall 

Providence, July 15. — Business con- 
tinued in its slump last week, with 
only one house going over par, the 
RKO Victory. "The Man from Utah" 
and "Chloe" made up the dual bill. 
The take was $1,150. 

Heat in the early part of the week 
almost emptied the houses. Managers 
say the religious campaign is also a 
severe blow. 

Total first run business was $18,850. 
average is $33,500. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing Julv 12 : 

"DR. MONICA" (F. N.) 
"THE MERRY FRINKS" (F. N.) 
MAJESTIC— (2.400) . 15c-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $4,000. (Average. $7,000) 

"LAUGHING BOY" (M-G-M) 
LOEW'S STATE— (3,800), 15c-40c, 7 days. 
Bill Robinson on stage. Gross: $7,100. 
(Average, $12,000) 

"SHOOT THE WORKS" (Para.) 
"MONEY MEANS NOTHING" 
(Monogram) 
PARAMOUNT— (2,400), 15c-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $3,500. (Average. $6,500) 

"OF HUMAN BONDAGE" (Radio) 
"I CAN'T ESCAPE" (Beacon) 
RKO ALB EE — (2.300), 15c-40c, 4 days. 
Gross: $3,100. (Average. $7,000) 
"THE MAN FROM UTAH" (Monogram) 
"CHLOE" (Pinnacle) 
RKO VICTORY— (1,600). 10c-25c, 4 days. 
Gross: $1,150. (Average. $1,000) 



Noted for 

UNIFORMITY 



REVOLUTIONARY new qualities 
made Eastman Super-Sensitive "Pan" 
a byword almost overnight. But only day-in 
and day-out delivery of those qualities over 
a long period could give this film lasting 
fame in the motion-picture world. Uniform- 
ity . . . the quality that has always character- 
ized Eastman films . . . has made Eastman 
Super-Sensitive Panchromatic Negative the 
brilliant leader it is today. Eastman Kodak 
Company. (J. E. Brulatour, Inc., Distribu- 
tors, New York, Chicago, Hollywood.) 



EASTMAN Super-Sensitive 
Panchromatic Negative 



6 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Monday, July 16, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE DAILY* 
HOLLYWOOD PREVIEW 



"Their Big Moment" 

(Radio ) 

Hollywood, July 15. — "Their Big Moment" will disappoint some who 
expect to see Slim Summerville and Zasu Pitts parade continuously 
through six reels of comedy situations. However, this is redeemed ten 
fold by clever and different treatment of interpolating melodrama and 
mystery with comedy. The formula, revolutionary as it might seem for 
this team, results in pleasing entertainment for any type of audience. 

Starting out with a serious note, it drops to the ridiculous antics of 
William Gaxton, the great magician, employing Miss Pitts and Sum- 
merville as his assistants. Their actions backstage while playing big- 
time vaudeville are hilarious until they are inveigled into giving a 
demonstration of their tricks and psychic powers in the home of a 
wealthy widow desiring to receive a message from her late husband. 
Miss Pitts becomes a dumb seer who forgets her lines and by doing so 
uncovers a plot to kill the widow for her money. This makes the trio 
heroes instead of becoming exposed by conspirators as fakes. With such 
able players as Kay Johnson, Bruce Cabot, Ralph Morgan, Julie Haydon, 
Huntly Gordon and Tamara Geva, plus clever treatment, dialogue and 
direction, a pleasing bill of entertainment is made possible. Running 
time, 70 minutes. 

"Happy Landings" 

(M onogram) 

Hollywood, July 15. — This is a thoroughly entertaining independent 
production timed for action and speed, suspense and romance, all cen- 
tering around air pilots. 

The story deals with Ray Walker and Hyram Hoover, as flying 
lieutenants, both in love with Jacqueline Wells, daughter of the com- 
manding officer of their squadron. Through the medium of a gang of 
crooks, Walker is forced unwillingly to fly two bank robbers across the 
border. The remainder of the picture goes speedily from one episode 
to another following Walker's and Hoover's attempts at their capture and 
the final apprehension of the crooks, all including an automobile chase 
below the border and an airplane duel at sea. All ends favorably as 
Hoover steps aside for Walker in the favor of Miss Wells. 

The cast contributes to the picture, including Walker, Hoover, Miss 
Wells, William Farnum, as the colonel, and Noah Beery, as Miss Wells' 
father. R. N. Bradbury directed. 

It's a good independent program picture. Running time, 70 minutes. 



Myers Calls 
Cancellation 
"Red Herring' 



(Continued from page 1) 

really afford relief from the forced 
showing of current salacious pictures 
he would have permitted the cancella- 
tion of all pictures condemned by the 
Legion of Decency or other identified 
group. 

"The most that exhibitors will get 
out of the present plan will be an 
argument with the exchange managers 
which they are bound to lose, with 
possibly, an appeal to the producer- 
controlled grievance boards set up un- 
der the motion picture code." 

The opening paragraph of the state- 
ment reads : "It was to be expected 
that Will Hays, having brought down 
upon the theatres a nationwide boycott 
by his failure to enforce the rules of 
production, would take some action 
designed to divert attention from the 
charges now being made against him 
without reforming in any important 
particular the policies and practices 
of his employers, the motion picture 
producers." 

It continues : "As a matter of fact, 
the plan announced by Mr. Hays is 
merely temporary in character ; it does 
not apply to pictures released later 
than three days after the date of the 
announcement ; and its calculated 
vagueness casts the burden upon the 
exhibitors in many communities of or- 
ganizing 'concerted objection' to a 
given picture in order to gain the 
cancellation privilege and then leaves 
it to the producer to determine whether 
there is sufficient opposition to justify 
the exercise of that privilege." 



Saenger Offers Cut 
To 50 Days in N. 0. 

New Orleans, July 15. — Offer of 
Saenger Theatres to reduce its clear- 
ance to 50 days and a clearance plan 
submitted by major exchanges were 
the two principal developments of an 
open hearing held by the clearance and 
zoning board. 

The major exchanges offered the 
following clearance based on time ex- 
piring after conclusion of first run 
engagements : Second run, 45 days ; 
first subsequent run, 50 days ; second 
subsequent run, 95 days ; third subse- 
quent run, 110 days; 10-cent houses 
and premium houses, 270 days. The 
board went into executive session to 
consider this, but reached no decision. 

The board has included, besides 
New Orleans theatres, houses in Gret- 
na, Westwego and similar suburbans 
in one zone, designated as A. This is 
done in order to clarify the premium 
menace which is being worked on. 

Samuel son May Quit 
Jersey Leadership 

(Continued from page 1) 

Charnow, now vice-president, will be 
named. 

Leaders of eastern units will meet 
again shortly, the date to be set by 
Walter B. Littlefield, who is in charge 
of the region. The session will be 
held the latter part of the month. 
All members of eastern units have 
been invited to attend the Jersey con- 
vention. 



Campi Orders Quick 
Action on Clearance 

(Continued from page 1) 

protests reached code boards July 2. 
It so happens Jnly 1 fell on a Sunday 
and no mail was delivered. 

After boards complete hearings on 
pending protests and schedules, they 
will adjourn until Nov. 1, unless called 
upon by Campi sooner. 

On and after Nov. 1 protests and 
new schedules can be filed for the 
1935-36 season. 

Although New York was regarded 
as a possible storm center for pro- 
tests on the present schedules, very- 
few complaints were filed. A few 
changes were made as a result, but 
no new schedule is on record. Sev- 
eral changes were made in New Jer- 
sey. One New York case came up 
last week, but it was left for further 
consideration, and one Long Island 
case, Jose Seider against Loew's Val- 
encia, comes up Wednesday. • 

Exchange centers and surrounding 
cities which have already sent in sche- 
dules are : 

Miami, St. Petersburg, Cambridge 
and Wellesley, Mass. ; Buffalo, Cleve- 
land, Toledo, Texas, Denver, Little- 
ton, Colo. ; Detroit, Grand Rapids, 
Indianapolis, Louisville, Fort Wayne, 
New Castle, Ind. ; Richmond, Ind. ; 
Kansas City, St. Joseph, Wichita, At- 
chison, Kan. ; Los Angeles, New Ha- 
ven, Hartford, Bridgeport, Western 



Connecticut, Omaha, Portland, Ore. ; 
Salt Lake City and Provo, Utah ; 
Butte, Mont. ; San Jose, St. Louis, 
Olympia, Everett, Wenatchee, Wash- 
ington ; Memphis. 

This does not indicate the final 
list. Several cities have schedules filed 
before July 1, which have not been 
submitted. 



Rosenblatt West Soon 

Washington, July 15. ■ — Division 
Administrator Sol A. Rosenblatt plans 
to leave on his second coast trip within 
the next two weeks. He was in 
Philadelphia over the week-end on 
another of the codes under his super- 
vision. 



Politicians in Now 

Buffalo, July 15. — The Erie 
County Board of Supervisors has 
joined the "purge the movies" drive 
with approval of a resolution by Su- 
pervisor Harry J. Dixon, Democrat 
of Buffalo's second ward, expressing 
"resentment and distaste of present- 
day movies of a vulgar and lewd char- 
acter." 

Pa. Passes "Dr. Monica" 

Pittsburgh, July 15. — The Pennsyl- 
vania censors have finally passed "Dr. 
Monica," eliminating only 90 seconds 
of running time, it is reported. How- 
ever, they insisted upon a couple of 
other changes which have been made. 



Foreign Film 
To Get Close 
Code Scrutiny 



(Continued from page 1) 

his opinion, story, treatment or dia- 
logue do not conform to the tenets of 
the code, Hart will move for changes. 
He will also preview completed 
product and issue certificates and 
authorize the use of the agreed upon 
seal where product passes his in- 
spection. 

Where foreign pictures are con- 
cerned, it will obviously be difficult 
and, in many cases, impossible to 
change stories. However, editing and 
deletions will be enforced to make- 
such pictures conform. 

Liberties Union in 
Move on Film Drive 

(Continued from page I) 

community to clear up any possible 
uncertainty as to the aims and pur- 
poses of their activities. 

"To that end we believe these or- 
ganizations using the boycott and pub- 
licity should state immediately and 
specifically whether or not they favor 
the present existing censorship of mo- 
tion pictures in the several states 
where such censorship now exists by 
law. 

"In the absence of any construc- 
tive contribution by these self-ap- 
pointed organizations," the statement 
concludes, "we fear they are inevit- 
ably laying the foundation for a form 
of censorship either governmental or 
religious, not only of the movies, but 
of the stage, the radio, and books, 
magazines, and the press." 

Censors So Severe, 
Kansas Clergy Calm 

(Continued from page 1) 

of Concordia already has issued a call 
for Legion of Decency pledges, while 
Bishop Johannes of the large Leaven- 
worth diocese has announced he will 
shortly join in the campaign. There 
are estimated to be 120,000 Catholics 
in the state. 

While the Kansas board is known 
as one of the most severe in the coun- 
try, the present agitation has appar- 
ently had no effect on its decisions. 
The defenders of the state's morals , 
have ordered numerous cuts and re- 
visions. 



Omaha Catholic Paper 
Printing - Film Lists 

Omaha, July 15. — The True J'oice, 
publication of the Omaha Catholic dio- 
cese, is now making it ^ definite policy 
to print each week a list of objection- 
able and non-objectionable films as se- 
lected by the local standards commit- 
tee. Besides advocating boycotting 
films until they are cleaned up the 
paper is even campaigning against a 
local daily for its policy of advocating 
clean films on the front page and car- 
rying obscene advertising on films on 
its inside pages. 

Indorsement of the Legion of De- 
cency clean film drive is expected at 
the convention of the Walther League, 
which started here today, it was stated 
by Rev. Lawrence Acker, pastor of 
the First Lutheran Church. 



Monday, July 16, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Circus Clown' 
Pulls $3,000 
Denver Gross 



Denver. July 15. — About the only 
bright spot on the theatrical map last 
week was the Aladdin, which took 
$3,000. up by $500, on "The Circus 
Clown." 

The Denver did a par $6,000 on 
"The Life of Yergie Winters," and 
"Smarty" and "Finishing School," a 
dual, had a good $2,250 at the Para- 
mount. 

Total first run business was $19,250. 
Average is $20,500. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 12 : 

"THE CIRCUS CLOWN" (F. N.) 

ALADDIN— (1.500). 25c-35c-50c, 7 days. 
Gross: $3,000. (Average, $2,500) 

"KISS AND MAKE UP" (Para.) 
DFNHAM — (1.500), 25c-40c. 6 days. 
Grcsr: $2,500. (Average $4,000) 
"THE LIFE OF VERGIE WINTERS" 
(Radio) 

DENBER— (2.500), 25c-35c-50c. 7 days. 
Gross: $6,000. (Average. $6,000) 

"FCG OVER FRISCO" (F. N.) 
ORPHE I'M —(2.600). 25c-35c-50c. 7 days. 
Gross: $5,500. (Average. $6,000) 
"SMARTY" (Warners) 
"FINISHING SCHOOL" (Radio) 
PARAMOUNT— (2.000). 25c-40c. 7 days. 
Gross: $2,250. (Average, $2,000). 



Grosses Off Badly 
In Montreal Spots 

Montreal, July 15. — Grosses were 
away off last week with thousands go- 
ing into the country. "Little Man, 
What Now?" and "The Merry 
Frinks" on a dual bill at the Capitol 
took $8,000, but this was $1,000 below 
normal. 

The Princess reached a par $0,000 
on "Sisters Under the Skin" and "The 
Hell Cat." 

Total first run business was $34,500. 
Average is $43,000. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 7: 

"LITTLE MAN. WHAT NOW?" (Univ.) 
"THE MERRY PRINKS" (F.N.) 

CAPITOL — (2,547). 25c-35c-40c-50c-60c. 7 
Jays. Gross: $8,500. (Average. ^9.000) 
"SPRINGTIME FOR HENRY" (Fox) 

"KEEP 'EM ROLLING" (Radio) 
IMPERIAL— (1.914). 25c-40c-50c. 7 days. 
Vaudeville: Three Rhythm Queens; Sher- 
man & McVey; Packard & Dodge: Wiora 
Stoney; Bert Fayle; George Downing; 
Lynn. Lewis & Hale: George Hunter. 
Gross: $5,500. (Average. $6,500) 

"LAUGHING BOY" (M-G-M) 
"HALF A SINNER" (Univ.) 
LOEW'S— (3.115). 25c-35c-50c-65c. 7 days. 
Gross: $6,500. (Average. $10,500) 

"WHEN SINNERS MEET" (Radio) 

"WILD GOLD" (Fox) 
PALACE— (2,600), 25c -35c -50c -60c -75c, 7 
days. Gross: $8,000. (Average, $11,000) 
"SISTERS UNDER THE SKIN" (Col.) 
"THE HELL CAT" (Col.) 
PRINCESS — (2.272). 25c-35c-50c-65c, 7 
days. Gross: $6,000. (Average, $6,000) 



Pickford to Buy Play 

Kansas City. July 15. — Passing 
through here on her way to take part 
in "Mary Pickford Day" at the 
World's Fair. Mary Pickford de- 
clared she planned to give the Broad- 
way plays the once-over, choosing one 
for her next picture. She said she 
planned to continue her writing for 
Good Housekeeping, begun last month. 
She termed as "very indefinite" reports 
she is to close a deal for the publi- 
cation of a series of articles on Holly- 
wood. 



Variety Club Chatter 



Cincinnati 

Cincinnati. July 15. — The local 
club's first picnic will be held at 
Stickler's Grove, suburban, July 30. 
All proceeds are to go to the Film 
Board of Relief, according to Noah 
Schecter, Ralph Kinsler and El- 
mer Dressman, who comprise the 
picnic committee. 

Barker Bill Hastings, skipper of 
the RKO Lyric, was absent but ac- 
counted for a couple of days last week. 
The heat got him, and he spent his 
enforced vacation in bed. 

Col. Arthur Frudenfeld is wear- 
ing that homesick look. The better 
half is visiting in California. 

Manny Shure and Joe Goetz have 
returned from a fortnight's vacation 
with new enthusiasm and an inex- 
haustable supply of tall fish stories. 



Kansas City 

Kansas City, July 15. — Arrange- 
ments have been completed for the an- 
nual industry outing to be held July 
16 at the Ivanhoe Country Club, states 
A. H. Cole, general chairman. The 
affair is sponsored by the Motion Pic- 
ture Relief Fund and the Variety- 
Club. 

The program is the most elaborate 
ever staged here and attendance is ex- 
pected to break all records. Golf will 
highlight the before noon "doings," 
and in the afternoon there will be a 
baseball game between exhibitors and 
exchangemen. Swimming, games and 
contests, a kangaroo court and im- 
promptu entertainment will make the 
day a full one. The evening will be 
given over to dancing and entertain- 
ment. 

At the club's monthly business meet- 
ing, the following general committee 
was announced : A. H. Cole, Para- 
mount, chairman; C. A. Schultz, 
Commonwealth Theatres; Irwin Du- 
i'.insky. Dubinsky Bros. Theatres; 
E. C. Rhoden, Fox Midwest Thea- 
tres; George Carrington, Erpi. 

Committees functioning for the day 
have been appointed by the Board of 
Trade as follows : 

Refreshments- -A. F. Baker, chairman; 
R. Biechele, Ed Shanberg, Bill 
Altiiaus. Joe Manfre. 

Games and Contests — Harry Taylor. 
chairman; William Warner. Don Davis. 
Gus Diamond, Finton Jones. 

Golf — William Bentamin. chairman: 
Harry Taylor, Harris P. Wolfberg, Jay 
Means. 

Kangaroo Court — Leland Hazard, judge; 
Edgar Jones, policeman. 

Doctors — George Knappenberger. Clif- 
ford L. Gilles. 

Law and Order — William Warner. 

Baseball — Martin Finkelstein, J. A. 
Lewis. Charles Vaughan, "Dusty" 
Rhodes. Harry Hays. 

Entertainment — I. Dubinsky, chairman; 
George Baker, Barney Joffee, Jack 
Gregory. 

Publicity — Leo Finkelstein, chairman; 
Paul Bayzman, Al Finestone. 



Concessions — Leo Finkelstein, chair- 
man; Jim States, John Muchmore. Paul 
LaRoche. 

Two girls from each office will be 
selected as hostesses to schedule games 
and contests. The regular Monday 
luncheon meeting will be dispensed 
with for the day. 

New members recently receiving the 
"barker" degree are : Leland Hazard, 
I. T. O. attorney ; Dr. Clifford L. 
Gilles, and Martin Schiff, Univer- 
sal auditor. 

Before leaving for the East, Rev. 
R. W. Gardner, club chaplain, was 
presented a silver card signifying he 
was made an associate life member of 
the local tent. Cole made the present- 
ation, at a bon voyage party at the 
club. Another traveler is Sam 
Abend, on the high seas Europe- 
bound. 

Recent visitors have been Ben 
Blotcky, Paramount district man- 
ager, Minneapolis; Julian King, 
Metro, Denver, and these Erpi men : 
J. L. Reynolds, New York; R. Hil- 
ton, Chicago, and A. A. Ward, Dallas. 



Washington 

Washington, July 15. — The local 
Variety Club formally took its place 
among the family of tents when Na- 
tional Chief Barker John H. Harris. 
Pittsburgh, installed the officers. 

Assisting in the installation was Na- 
tional Orator A. K. Rowswell, Pitts- 
burgh. 

The officers are: John J. Payette, 
chief barker; Rudolph Berger, first 
assistant chief barker ; J. Louis Rome, 
second assistant chief barker ; Harry 
Hunter, propertyman ; Sam A. Ga- 
lanty, wagonman ; and Carter T. 
Barron, A. Julian Brylawski, 
Ciiari.es Kranz, Joseph P. Morgan, 
William K. Saxton, and Samuel N. 
Wheeler, canvassmen. 

Following the induction into office, 
a reception and house warming was 
held in the club rooms in the Willard 
Hotel. 

Entertainment was furnished by 
Mary Brian, Gordon and King, the 
Radio Aces, and the Russian Revels. 
Benny Ross acted as master of cere- 
monies. 

More than 80 barkers flocked to the 
weekly luncheon, with J. Louis Rome 
and Edward Jacobs acting as kings 
for the day. 

Dr. M. Sayle Taylor, better known 
as radio's "The Voice of Experience," 
was guest of honor. 

Fred M. Heider, one-time vaudeville 
dancer, was appointed as steward. 

When the club meets Monday 
king for the day will be Brylawski 
and Berger will present Sol. A. 
Rosenblatt. 



To Get More Hitler Film 

Samuel Cummins, of Jewel Prod., 
left for London Saturday aboard the 
Aquitania to bring back scenes of the 
Berlin and Munich uprising against 
the Hitler government, claimed to have 
been taken on the spot by Cornelius 
Vanderbilt. Jr. The clips will be made 
part of "Hitler's Reign of Terror," 
which is now being shown in this 
country by Cummins. 



Friedman in New Post 

Pittsburgh, July 15. — Max Fried- 
man, chief booker for Warners here, 
has been promoted to the Albany zone 
where he will be in charge of buying 
as well as bookings. He has taken up 
his new duties. 

Harry Feinstein, Warner short 
booker in the local office, gets Fried- 
man's post. Feinstein's successor has 
not yet been named. 



" Gets 
Good $30,000 
At Boston Met 



Boston, July 15. — With the vaca- 
tion season getting into full swing, 
grosses fell off last week, but even so, 
'Dr. Monica," with a stage show at 
'.he Metropolitan, reached $30,000, up 
by $2,000. 

"Of Human Bondage" was _ $2,000 
over par at $18,000 at Keith's, and 
' Murder in the Vanities" had a good 
$17,500 at Loew's State. 

Total first run business was $97,500. 
Average is $94,000. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing Tuly 12 : 

"COCKEYED CAVALIERS" (Radio) 
"LOVE CAPTIVE" (Univ.) 

BOSTON— (2,900), 25c-50c, 7 days. Gross: 
$16,000. (Average, $16,000) 
"RETURN OF THE TERROR" (F. N.) 
"KISS AND MAKE UP" (Para.) 

FENWAY— (1.800), 30c-50c, 7 days. Gross: 
$8,000. (Average, $9,000) 

"OF HUMAN BONDAGE" (Radio) 

KEITH'S — (3,500). 30c-50c, 7 days. Gross: 
$18,000. (Average, $16,000) 

"MURDER IN THE PRIVATE CAR" 
(M-G-M) 

LOEW'S STATE-(3.700), 35c-50c, 7 days. 
Gross: $17,500. (Average, $16,000) 

"DR. MONICA" (Warners) 
METROPOLITAN — (4.350), 30c-65c, 7 
days. Black and White Jamboree. Gross: 
$30,000. (Average, $28,000) 
"RETURN OF THE TERROR" (F. N.) 
"KISS AND MAKE UP" (Para.) 
PARAMOUNT— (1.800), 30c-50c, 7 days. 
Gross: $S.0O0. (Average. $9,000) 



"Scandal," "Nurse" 
Only Buffalo Draw 

Buffalo, July 15. — "Private Scan- 
dal" and "Registered Nurse" at the 
Century were the only films to do 
normal business. The take was 
$6,000. Pleat toward the end of the 
week offset a big week-end draw on 
"Shoot the Works." 

Total take was $31,100. Average 
is $34,800. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 13 : 

"THE CIRCUS CLOWN" (F. N.) 

BUFFALO — (3.500). 30c-55c, 7 days. 
Stage: Sid Gary; Wilbur Hall & Loretta 
Denr.ison; Allen & Kent; Vera Wilcox; 
Maxine Louise Kisor & Co.. Gross: $12,000. 
Average. $14,300) 

"PRIVATE SCANDAL" (Para.) 
"REGISTERED NURSE" (Warners) 
CENTURY— (3,000). 25c, 7 days. Gross: 
56.000. Average, $6,000) 

"SHOOT THE WORKS" (Para.) 
HIPPODROME— (2,100), 25c-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $7,100. Average, $8,000) 

"LET'S BE RITZY" (Univ.) 
"MURDER ON THE CAMPUS" 
(First Division) 
LAFAYETTE — (3.300). 25c, 7 days. 
Gross: $6,000. (Average, $6,500. 



Col. Pushing New 
Season's Production 

Hollywood, July 15. — Clearing its 
decks of the last of the present sea- 
son's product, Columbia is in the midst 
of activity on its production program 
for 1934-35. 

"One Night of Love," the first for 
the new year, completed, the studio is 
now at work on "Broadway Bill," 
"The Girl Friend," "That's Grati- 
tude," "Spring 3100," "Sure Fire," 
"$25 an Hour" "Eight Bells" and 
"The Depths Below." 

"Girl in Danger," "Blind Date, ' 
"The Defense Rests," "Name the 
Woman" and "Beyond the Law" wind 
up the present season. 




"EG. U.S. PAT. OFF. 



Du Pont Film Manufacturing Corporation 

35 WEST 45™ STREET SMITH & ALLER LTD. 

NEW YORK CITY 6656 - SANTA MONICA BLVD. 

PLANT - • . PARLIN, N.J. HOLLYWOOD, CAL. 



THECEfflPTRADE MARK HAS NEVER BEEN PLACED ON AN INFERIOR PRODUCT 



The Leading 

Newspaper 
of the - ^ 
Motion 
Picture 
Industry 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Alert, 

Intelligent 

and 

Faithful 
Service to 
the Industry 
in All 
Branches 



VOL. 36. NO. 12 



NEW YORK, MONDAY, JULY 16, 1934 



TEN CENTS 



Myers Calls 
Cancellation 
"Red Herring' 



Legion Lists Should Be 
Criterion, He Says 

Washington. July 15.— Abram F. 
Myers, general counsel for Allied, calls 
the privilege of cancellation of pic- 
tures to which public groups object 
" a red herring." and '"so vague as to 
lie meaningless." 

"There are thousands of commun- 
ities where there are no definite or- 
ganizations, but where a large propor- 
tion of the population is governed in 
movie attendance by the lists of con- 
demned pictures promulgated by na- 
tional and state groups not represented 
in such communities," the state nent 
reads. "Had Mr. Hays desired to 

(Continued on pane 6) 



Samuelson May Quit 
Jersey Leadership 

Because of the amount of work the 
presidency of the national Allied or- 
ganization has piled on him, Sidney 
Sa-uelson may decline to run agair 
as l ead of the New Jersey unit, which 
holds its election at the annual con 
vention Aug. 22-24 in Atlantic Citv. 

Samuelson says he hasn't decided 
yet whether he will want to continue 
as New Jersey leader, but expect- 
to come to a de'inite decision within 
the next few weeks. 

In the event he refuses to be re- 
nominated, it is most likely Julius 
(Continued on page 6) 



Ky. Exhibitors Plan 
Fight to Absorb Tax 

Frankfort, July 15. — Kentucky ex- 
hibitors, faced with loss of business 
through adoption of the sales tax, 
which went into effect July 1, will 
make a determined fight to be per- 
mitted to absorb the impost themselves 
instead of passing it on to the public. 
The law specifically provides that the 
Ittax must be paid by the purchaser 
and specifies penalties for anyone who 
attempts to pay the tax himself. 



Fox's Counterclaims 
Overruled by Court 

Counterclaims filed by William Fox 
against Fox Theatres Corp., when he 
was sued some time ago by the re- 
vivers for a sum totaling $2,066,082. 
have been thrown out by decision of 
ithe Appellate Division of the Supreme 
Court. 

The court ruled that if the claims 

(Continued on page 2) 



Various Para. 
Groups Near 
Understanding 

Are Reported Closer on 
Reorganization Views 



Various groups interested in Para- 
mount's reorganization and emergence 
of the company from the bankruptcy 
courts were reported proceeding in 
closer understanding than has pre- 
vailed for some time on Saturday. 

This was construed not necessarily 
as indicating the company was as yet 
ready to move for final reorganization, 
but rather is indicative of a desire for 
as much cooperation as may be ef- 
fected in view of conflicting points of 
view as against adoption of obstruc- 
tionist tactics. 

One source, close to the situation, 
summed it up in this fashion : 

"I think it entirely fair to say that 
bondholders, debenture holders and 
common stockholders now lean toward 
a pretty well established conviction 
that there is no birthday cake to be 

(Continued on pane 4) 



No Para. Committee 
Meets Planned Now 

No immediate meetings of Para- 
mount's theatre advisory committees 
are planned, it was said Saturday, the 
last session having been held on the 
coast during Paramount's annual sales 
convention. 

The presence of N. L. Nathanson, 
Barney Balaban. Martin Mullin and 
Sam Pinanski does not have to do 
with theatre advisory sessions, it was 
asserted. 



Cleveland Pleased 
By Week of Singles 

Cleveland, July 15. — Cleveland ex- 
hibitors are delighted with the first 
week's business under a single feature 
standard. Subsequent run houses, 
which anticipated a sudden drop in 

(Continued on page 2) 



A Long Time 

Cincinnati, July 15. — A local 
exhibitor and branch man- 
ager were discussing the film 
and other codes. 

Said the exhibitor: 

"Don't expect too much of 
any code. Think how long it 
is taking to put over the very 
simple one Moses presented." 



Foreign Film 
To Get Close 
Code Scrutiny 

Imports, Eastern Output 
Must Get Hart O. K. 



Campi Orders 
Quick Action 
On Clearance 



Campi has put its foot down on lo- 
cal clearance and zoning boards, or- 
dering members to immediately dispose 
of all pending protests on current and 
new schedules filed before July 1. 

The order came as a result of com- 
plaints of various distributors who 
claim that holding up of the schedules 
has retarded the sales season. 

Of the 31 exchange centers, only 
17 have been heard from. These key 
spots have sent in schedules for 35 
cities in their territories. 

While no time limit is given to the 
hearing of the pending protests, the 
order states that appeals must be 
made five days after decisions are 
handed down and schedules pub- 
lished. Boar-Is will not hear com- 
plaints filed after July 1. 

With the declaration tint no further 
extension from the July 1 deadline 
will be granted, Campi faces many 
complaints from exhibitors whose 

(Continued on pane 6) 

FWC Files Protest 
On Coast Clearance 

Los Angeles. July 15 — After play- 
ing an important part in the promul- 
gation of the local clearance and zon- 
ing schedule, Fox West Coast has 
protested to Campi that it wants to 
continue schedules as they are now 
constituted, including duals. 

Campi has heard the protest, but no 
action has been taken. 



127 Houses in 22 Cities 
Report $1,173,017 Gross 

One hundred and twenty-seven kev citv houses in 22 cities report a total 
gross of $1,173,017 for the theatre week ending June 21-22. This compares 
with $1,111,432 for 125 houses covering the previous seven-day period. 

Boston, Chicago, Cleveland. Detroit. Indianapolis, Kansas City, Los Angeles. 
Minneapolis, Omaha, Philadelphia, San Francisco, St. Paul, Seattle and 

(Continued on page 4) 



Foreign product, annexed by Hays 
distributor-members for this market, 
is to be submitted to the reinforced 
Production Code Administration 
which becomes operative at midnight 
tonight. 

Vincent G. Hart, for several years 
handling the eastern administration of 
the production code, will be in charge, 
cloaked with powers identical with 
those conferred upon Joseph I. Breen, 
Production Code Administrator, by 
resolution of the Hays board of direc- 
tors on June 13, although Hart is an- 
swerable to Breen, 

All eastern production, whether fea- 
ture or shorts, will be submitted to 
Hart in script form prior to the 
cranking of a camera. Where, it is 

(Continued on page 6) 



Liberties Union in 
Move on Film Drive 

Organizations fighting objectionable 
pictures were called upon in a state- 
ment issued yesterday after a meet- 
ing of the National Council on Free- 
dom from Censorship, unit of the 
American Civil Liberties Union, to 
clarify their attitude toward state and 
Federal censorship. Copies of the 
statement were sent to Cardinal Hayes, 
the Legion of Decency, the M. P. 
Research Council and other groups. 

"The council feels," says the state- 
ment, "that the agitation against the 
movies has created a large measure 
of confusion in the public mind and 
that the organizations which have en- 
gendered the publicity owe it to the 
(Continued on page 6) 



Censors So Severe, 
Kansas Clergy Calm 

Kansas City, July 15. — The work 
of the Kansas censors has been so ef- 
ficient that a church campaign against 
indecent films in Kansas does not ap- 
pear to be necessary, Miss Hazel 
Myers, board chairman, says she has 
been informed by persons high in 
church circles. 

Miss Myers explained religious 
leaders in Kansas feel the censors can 
be depended upon to keep the state's 
screens free from offensiveness and 
for that reason the current agitation 
within the state is to be moderate. 
Bishop Tief of the Catholic diocese 

(Continued on page 6) 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Monday, July 16, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 

(Registered U. S. Patent Office) 



Vol. 36 



July 16, 1934 



No. 12 




Martin Quiglev 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 
MAURICE KANN iMJt 

Editor 
JAMES A. CRON 
Advertising Manager 



Published daily except Sunday and ho i 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub 
sidiary of Quigley Publications, Lnc.. 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 1790 Broadway, New 
York. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Cable ad 
dress "Quigpubco, New York. All con- 
tents copyrighted 1934 by Motion Pictuie 
Daily, Inc. Address all correspondence to 
the New York Office. Other Quigley pub 
lications: MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 
BETTER THEATRES, THE MOTlpiN 
PICTURE ALMANAC and THE CHI 
CAGOAN. ... 

Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Lite 
Building, Vine and Yucca Streets, Victor 
M. Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 407 
South Dearborn Street, Edwin S. Chi 
ford, manager; London Bureau: Remo 
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sentative; Budapest Bureau: 11 Olas; 
Fasor 17, Endre Hevesi, Representative. 

Entered as second class matter Januar> 
4, 1926 at the Post Office at New York 
City, N. Y., under Act of March 3, 1879 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada $15 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 



< Purely 
Personal ► 

AL CHRISTIE starts production 
today at the Eastern Service 
Studios on "Bless You," first of Edu- 
cational's new series of musical come- 
dies. 

Ed Kuykendall, president of the 
M.P.T.O.A., plans to leave for his 
home town on Wednesday. 

Harold Rodner is back from Sara- 
nac on an NVA mission. 



IATSE Holds Coleman 

Columbus, July IS. — At the annual 
convention of the I.A.T.S.E., held 
here in conjunction with the con- 
vention of the Ohio Federation of La- 
bor, Harry E. Coleman was re-elected 
executive secretary. The following 
were named to the executive board : 
Larry Buck, Columbus, chairman : 
Russell Sheats, Toledo; R. W. Mills, 
Springfield; Gene Lauri, Cincinnati; 
W. W. Hoffebert, Dayton; Charles 
Schumacher, Canton, and T. A. Can- 
iff, Steubenville. 

E. J. Tinney, Youngstown, was in 
charge of the session. 



Willis M. Beale Dead 

Omaha, July 15.— Willis M. Beale, 
Warner booker, is dead here. He had 
been suffering from a throat ailment 
that had kept him from work two 
months. He is survived by his wife. 



Insiders' Outlook 



PARAMOUNT and Metro have 
two troublesome women on 
their hands. At Paramount, it's 
a gal named Mae West. At Me- 
tro, a more platinum blonde 
named Jean Harlow. Both pro- 
ducers are thinking hard what 
they can do about them in the 
light of the church movement. 
Take either one or both, if you 
like, and imagine La West or 
La Harlow in a sweet and virgin- 
al "Little Women" type of role. 
It would be funny. Their pro- 
ducers recognize in these two 
players the public's association 
with well-defined characteriza- 
tions. They argue tickets are 
bought on that basis, but it's a 
basis which church forces no like. 
What to do about them is major 
and tough to solve. . . . 

▼ 

Friendly pressure from several 
sources influenced Charles E. 
Richardson to reconsider that 
permanent appointment to one of 
three Paramount trusteeships. He 
got it, of course, the other day. 
Ran the arguments which weaned 
him away from withdrawal : "The 
reorganization is proceeding nice- 
ly now. If you step out and a 
stranger to what has been trans- 
piring comes in, the consequent 
delay is apt to be unfortunate." 
Richardson stayed. . . 

▼ 

Pessimistic note on an other- 
wise pleasant afternoon : The 
Cleveland ban on duals is rocky 
already. The boys there, nice and 
neighborly like, are sufficiently 
suspicious of each other to make 
trouble not so far removed. First 
reaction of the larger operators 
there was delight that duals had 
been massacred. The little fel- 
lows are throwing the squawks. 
Chief trouble : Trying to keep 90- 
odd exhibitors, especially Cleve- 
land exhibitors, looking at the 
same problem through the same 
eyes. . . 

T 

"Joan of Arc" may be made for 
next season by Radio with La 
Hepburn in the title spot, but 
again it may not be. One certain 
fact about it is that "The Little 



Minister" will be her first, not 
the dramatic story of the Maid 
of Orleans. RKO asserts quite 
positively church opinion, or fear 
of it, had nothing at all to do 
with the case. Thornton Wilder, 
author of "The Bridge of San 
Luis Rev," did one treatment. So 
did several others, each seeking 
escape from the stormy waters 
that swirl around the French and 
English, as well as varying his- 
torical points of view on the sub- 
ject matter. The color splash in 
Radio's product book having to 
do with the picture has been blot- 
ted out and the space diverted to 
other matters. That may or not 
be the determining factor, but 
there you have it. . . 

T 

Two pictures, made an ocean 
and a continent apart but deal- 
ing with the same central char- 
acter, are directing the attention 
of producers toward a more care- 
ful sifting of story rights in the 
future. Along about the time 
Darryl Zanuck finished the new 
Colman, "Bulldog Drummond 
Strikes Back," in Hollywood, 
John Maxwell's British Interna- 
tional had completed "The Return 
of Bulldog Drummond" in Lon- 
don. In this market where Col- 
man's presence in any picture 
means something, the 20th Cen- 
tury attraction naturally would 
lead over the other. Yet release 
of the British picture at or about 
the same time, and perhaps day 
and date in competitive theatres, 
certainly would leave its mark. 
This is one reason why Mundus, 
new U. A. distributing subsid- 
iary, made a deal for the British 
film with Lou Metzger. All of 
this is influencing producing cir- 
cles to exercise additional care in 
the purchase of stories built 
around the same central hero. . . 
T 

He was objecting to his parts. 
His studio figured it was time to 
turn disciplinarian and farmed 
him to a smaller producer. No 
one was particularly excited 
about the loan except the director 
who got this player. Came the 
time when the film was com- 



Par amount Up y 2 on Big Board 



Net 



Consolidated Film Industries, pfd. 



Fox Film "A".. 

Loew's, lnc 

Paramount, cts.. 
Pathe Exchange. 
Warner Bros 



High 


Low 


Close 


Change 


Sales 


1354 


13J4 


13J4 




200 


99 


98'<S 


99 


+ % 


300 


US/ & 


12J4 


12-5* 


+ Vs 


200 


28 


27% 


27 


+ A 


500 


3H 






+ A 


800 




2 


2 




200 


*•% 


4*4 






1,300 



Technicolor Gains Vs on Curb 



High 

Technicolor 13J* 



Low 

13M 



Net 

Close Change 

13^ + Vs 



Trading Light in Bond Market 



Pathe 7s '37 ww 

Warner Bros. 6s '39 wd. 



High 

• 99A 
. 53J4 



Lew 

99A 
5354 



Net 
Close Change 

99K 

53J4 - 54 



Sales 

400 



Sales 

4 
6 



pleted and out it went to become 
one of the biggest draws of the 
season ; to create new fans for 
the player; to deluge his contract 
studio with requests for this 
thespian in more of the same- 
type of roles. The player : Clark 
Gable. The disciplining studio; 
M-G-M. The lucky director: 
Frank Capra. The fortunate stu- 
dio : Columbia. The attraction, 
and a real one : "It Happened 
One Night." . . . 

T 

Are they smiling happily over 
at Universal ? Last year, the 
Music Hall booked in four. This 
year, the new contract calls for 
10. . . . Watch for interesting 
changes in the Greater New York 
film buy for next season. Upsets 
are on the way which won't make 
the situation between Loew's and 
RKO any friendlier. . . Walter 
Wanger, back from the Conti- 
nent, found his trip interesting 
and worthwhile. He takes this 
word of advice to Hollywood and 
its producers: "Travel and see 
the world before boring it." . . . 

K A N X 



Cleveland Pleased 
By Week of Singles 

(Continued from page 1) 

attendance due to the shortened pro- 
gram, express satisfaction because of 
the varied program. 

The only kicks reported from a 
neighborhood house were on the 
ground that the feature shown was 
not suitable to that particular neigh- 
borhood. In that case, the opinion 
was expressed, business could have 
been saved by playing another feature 
with it, provided it was suitable. 



Fox's Counterclaims 
Overruled by Court 

(Continued from page 1) 

were allowed to prevail he would be 
in the position of a preferred creditor 
"to the detriment of other creditors." 

The decision is a reversal of Su- 
preme Court Justice Peter P. Smith, 
who allowed the first counterclaim to 
stand and sustains his ruling in dis- 
missing two other claims. 



Harry Sherman Resigns 

Harry Sherman has resigned as 
president of Local 306, and Harland 
Holmden, third vice-president of the 
I.A.T.S.E., has been placed in charge. 

Whether or not other officers of 
the local will hold their posts was not 
announced, and their future status 
could not be determined. 

An election to pick a successor to 
Sherman is planned in the near future. 



Cincy Strand to Singles 

Cincinnati, July 15. — The Strand, 
downtown independent, after three 
weeks of double featuring, has 
switched to single features, playing 
second runs for a full week. Prices 
of 15 cents for matinee and 15 and 
20 cents evenings, recently set, re- 
main the same. 



Webb, Ray Are in Town 

Harry Webb and Bernard B. Ray, 
producers of the Tom Tyler. Jack 
Perrin and Bud 'n' Ben series, are in 
New York for about a week on state 
right deals. 





It's cause for rejoicing when show- 
men get together and kick out dat 
ole debbil double bill. Educational 
steps up its production budget and 
the short subjects step out for finer 
entertainment all through the show. 



Here's dog-gone good news for the exhibitors who are 
just going back to the ideal form of varied picture 
program . . . and for the wise ones who never left it . . . 

ERNEST TRUEX 

in 

Dog-gone Babies 

From the play "Love aud Babies" by Herbert P. MeCormack 
Adapted by William Watson aud Art Jarrett 
Produced by Al Christie 

Tom Patrirola aud Buster West will soon be on parade wiib —Hi, Hi* 
Sailor": Buster Keaf Oil with another to duplicate the hits he has made in 
••The Gold Ghost*' and •• Allez Oop!** and Bing Crosby singing the 
songs that made him famous in four short subject specials. 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



127 Houses in 22 Cities 
Report $1,173,017 Gross 

(Continued from pane 1) 

Washington reported gains. These points report a drop in the current com- 
pilation over the last: Denver, New York, Pittsburgh, Portland and 
Providence. 

. Comparative grosses for the latest available periods : 



Week Ending 
June 21-22 



Week Ending 
June 14-15 



No. Theatres 

Boston 6 

Buffalo 6 

Chicago 7 

Cleveland 6 

Denver 5 

Detroit 4 

Indianapolis 4 

Kansas City 5 

Los Angeles 8 

Minneapolis 6 

Montreal 5 

New York 11 



Oklahoma City. 

Omaha 

Philadelphia 



4 
4 
7 

Pittsburgh 5 

6 
6 
6 
.4 
6 
6 



Portland 

Providence 

San Francisco... 

St. Paul 

Seattle 

Washington 



127 



Gross 
$105,000 
39,900 

126,500 
37,500 
23,700 
54,500 
16,250 
51,300 
72,192 
28,250 
39,000 

221,025 
14,100 
27,050 
60,900 
36,600 
20,900 
25,000 
68,000 
15,550 
26,900 
62,900 

$1,173,017 



No. Theatres 
6 
5 
7 
6 
5 
4 
4 
5 
8 
6 
4 
11 
4 
4 
7 

6 
6 
6 
4 
6 
6 



Gross 
$98,000 
33,400 
100,000 
33,400 
24,000 
50,800 
14,000 
31,000 
72,016 
25,500 
32,000 
243,416 
14,100 
23,800 
56,000 
38,600 
24,400 
33.000 
59,700 
15,500 
26,800 
62,000 



$1,111,432 



Comparative grosses compiled from 
show this : 

Week Ending 

September 29-30, 1933 

October 6-7 

October 13-14 

October 20-21 

October 27-28 

November 3-4 

November 10-11 

November 17-18 

November 24-25 

December 1-2 

December 8-9 

December 15-16 

December 22-23 

December 29-30 

January 5-6, 1934 

January 12-13 

January 19-20 

January 26-27 

February 2-3 

February 9-10 

February 16-17 

February 23-24 

March 2-3 

March 9-10 

March 16-17 

March 23-24 

March 30-31 

April 6-7 

13-14 

20-21 



April 
April 
April 27-28 .... 

May 3-4 

May 10-11 .... 
Mav 17-18 .... 

May 24-25 

May 31-June 1 

June 7-8 

June 14-15 .... 
June 21-22 .... 



day-to-day 


reports for 39 weeks 


Theatres 


Grosses 


135 


$1,342,710 


141 


1,417,886 


143 


1,544,838 


141 


1,581,308 


143 


1,509,422 


142 


1,500.740 


141 


1,379,560 


144 


1,375,132 


141 


1,431,209 


141 


1,418,753 


142 


1,558,832 


139 


1,221,032 


133 


1,071,457 


138 


1,433,289 


136 


1,714,824 


138 


1,435,649 


136 


1,305,267 


135 


1,348,517 


135 


1,338,371 


135 


1,270,345 


136 


1,317,011 


136 


1,316,421 


135 


1,350,548 


134 


1,378,865 


133 


1 ,302,020 


128 


1,291,695 


134 


1,247,322 


135 


1,571,695 


132 


1,360,061 


135 


1,342,151 


133 


1,307,764 


134 


1,256,631 


133 


1,250,702 


133 


1,260.655 


133 


1,209,381 


132 


1,209,113 


128 


1.123,764 


125 


1,111,432 


127 


1.173.017 



(Copyright, 1934. Quigley Publications) 



4 



Various Para. 
Groups Near 
Understanding 



(Continued from page 1) 

cut up in huge slices and that, avoid- 
ance of disturbances in advancing 
plans for reorganization is to be de- 
sired from all angles." 

Kuhn, Loeb & Co. now have assem- 
bled in rough form a wide array of 
statistics bearing on reorganization. 
In about 10 days, the expectation is 
their plan, seen principally through 
the eyes of the bondholders naturally, 
will be ready for discussion. In the 
meantime, the stockholders' interests, 
formidable in that over 3,000,000 
shares of Paramount common are out- 
standing, are being developed through 
an analysis being carried forward by 
Coverdale and Colpitts. 

No formal presentation of any plan 
is viewed as possible until various 
groups reach a basis of understanding. 
This is the foundation for the antici- 
pation that representatives of bond- 
holders and stockholders must some- 
where along the line get together and 
mutually arrive at a basis of under- 
standing. 

It is held that considerable depends 
on how far apart the preliminary 
plans drawn up by each group prove 
to be. Skirmishing and jockeying for 
position are regarded as an inevitable 
development in negotiations leading to 
a rapprochement. 

These negotiations are apt to spread 
over a period of several months. 



Omaha Houses Gain 
In Spite of Heat 

Omaha, July 15. — Extreme heat 
failed to hurt business last week. All 
houses were at par or above, and the 
Brandeis reached $4,250, over normal 
by $450, on "Cockeyed Cavaliers" and 
"Let's Trv Again." 

The world was $700 up at $4,300 
on "He Was Her Man" and "Call It 
Luck." 

Total first run business was $23,- 
250. Average is $21,250. 
Estimated takings : 

Week Ending July 11: 

"SHOOT THE WORKS" (Para.) 

PARAMOUNT — (2,900) , 2Sc-40c, 8 days. 
Stage: Ann Ronnell. Gross: $7,700. (Aver- 
age, $7,250) 

"COCKEYED CAVALIERS" (Radio) 
"LET'S TRY AGAIN" (Radio) 

BRANDEIS — (1,500). 20c-25c-35c, 7 days. 
Gross: $4,250. (Average, $3,800) 

Week Ending July 12: 

"CATHERINE THE GREAT" (U. A.) 
"PRIVATE SCANDAL" (Para.) 

ORPHEUM— (3,000), 25c-35c-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $7,000. (Average, $7,000) 

"HE WAS HER MAN" (Warners) 
"CALL IT LUCK" (Fox) 

WORLD— (2,200), 25c-35c, 7 days. Gross: 
$4,300. (Average, $3,500) 



Chicago Palace Slashes 

Chicago, July 15. — RKO with last 
week's program slashed prices at the 
Palace. The old scale of 35c-50c- 
75c became 25c-35c-55c, the latter 
price including tax. There will be 
no change in policy. 



St. Louis Boat Back 

St. Louis, July 15. — Showboat 
competition is in sight again this year. 
The Board of Public Service has 



again refused a permit for the boat to 
tie up at the foot of Pine St., but in 
previous years this has had no effect. 
Last year the boat operated in the 



Missouri River near the St. Charles, 
Mo., bridge. The year before it was 
at Musick's Ferry, both within con- 
venient motoring distance. 



Monday, July 16. 1934 

"Boy," Show, 
With $19,000 
Tops Chicago 



Chicago, July 15. — "Laughing Boy" 
and a stage show with Ted Cook's 
band was the only program in the 
Loop to top average. It ran up to 
$19,000 at the Oriental, over par by 
$3,000. 

Patronage slipped sharply else- 
where, due to weak programs. Local 
opinion is that the fair is failing to 
draw. Others say the theatres are 
feeling the effects of the church 
crusade. 

Total first run business was 
$110,000. Average is $127,600. 
Estimated takings : 

Week Ending July 12: 

"BABY TAKE A BOW" (Fox) 

CHICAGO— (4.000), 35c-50c-68c, 7 days. 
Stage: Mitzi Mayfair, Tito Guizar, Fred 
Sanborn & Co., Lowe, Bernoff & Wensley. 1 
Gross: $34,000. (Average, $34,600) 

"LAUGHING BOY" (M-G-M) 

ORIENTAL— (3,940), 25c-40c, 7 days. 
Stage : Bowery Follies with Beef Trust 
Girls, Ted Cook band. Gross: $19,000. 
(Average, $15,000) 

Week Ending July 10: 

"OPERATOR 13" (M-G-M) 

UNITED ARTISTS— (1,700), 30c-40c-60c, i 
7 days, 3rd week. Gross: $10,000. (Aver- 
age, $17,000) 

Week Ending July 12 

"I GIVE MY LOVE" (Univ.) 

PALACE— (2.509), 35c-50c-75c, 7 days. 
Stage: Billy House, Jack Whiting, Jeanie 
Lang, Maria Gambarelli. Gross: $18,000. J 
(Average, $22,000) 

Week Ending July 13: 

"SHE LEARNED ABOUT SAILORS" 
(Fox) 

MCVICKERS— (2.284). 30c -40c -60c, 7 days. 
Gross: $8,000. (Average, $13,000) 

Week Ending July 12: 

"SHOOT THE WORKS" (Para.) 

ROOSEVELT— (1.591), 25c-35c-50c, 7 days, 
2nd Loop week. Gross: $7,000. (Average, I 
$11,000) 

Week Ending July 14: 
"SISTERS UNDER THE SKIN" (Col.) 

STATE-LAKE— (2,776). 20c-25c-35c, 7 
days. Stage: WLS Roundup. Gross: 
$13,500. (Average, $15,000; 



Providence Slump 
Gains, Takes Fall 

Providence, July 15. — Business con- 
tinued in its slump last week, with 
only one house going over par, the 
RKO Victory. "The Man from Utah" 
and "Chloe" made up the dual bill. 
The take was $1,150. 

Heat in the early part of the week 
almost emptied the houses. Managers 
say the religious campaign is also a 
severe blow. 

Total first run business was $18,850. 
average is $33,500. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 12 : 

"DR. MONICA" (F. N.) 
"THE MERRY FRINKS" (F. N.) 

MAJESTIC— (2,400), 15c-40c, 7 da vs. 
Gross: $4,000. (Average. $7,000) 

"LAUGHING BOY" (M-G-M) 
LOEW'S STATE— (3,800), 15c-40c, 7 days. 
Bill Robinson on stage. Gross: $7,100. 
(Average, $12,000) 

"SHOOT THE WORKS" (Para.) 
"MONEY MEANS NOTHING" 
(Monogram) 
PARAMOUNT— (2,400), 15c-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $3,500. (Average. $6,500) 

"OF HUMAN BONDAGE" (Radio) 
"I CAN'T ESCAPE" (Beacon) 
RKO ALBEE— (2.300), 15c-40c, 4 days. 
Gross: $3,100. (Average. $7,000) 
"THE MAN FROM UTAH" (Monogram) 
"CHLOE" (Pinnacle) 
RKO VICTORY— (1.600). 10c-25c, 4 days. 
Gross: $1,150. (Average, $1,000) 



Noted for 

UNIFORMITY 



REVOLUTIONARY new qualities 
made Eastman Super-Sensitive "Pan" 
a byword almost overnight. But only day-in 
and day-out delivery of those qualities over 
a long period could give this film lasting 
fame in the motion-picture world. Uniform- 
ity . . . the quality that has always character- 
ized Eastman films . . . has made Eastman 
Super-Sensitive Panchromatic Negative the 
brilliant leader it is today. Eastman Kodak 
Company. (J. E. Brulatour, Inc., Distribu- 
tors, New York, Chicago, Hollywood.) 



EASTMAN Super-Sensitive 
Panchromatic Negative 



6 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Monday, July 16, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE DAILYS 
HOLLYWOOD PREVIEW 



"Their Big Moment" 

(Radio) 

Hollywood, July 15. — "Their Big Moment" will disappoint some who 
expect to see Slim Summerville and Zasu Pitts parade continuously 
through six reels of comedy situations. However, this is redeemed ten 
fold by clever and different treatment of interpolating- melodrama and 
mystery with comedy. The formula, revolutionary as it might seem for 
this team, results in pleasing entertainment for any type of audience. 

Starting out with a serious note, it drops to the ridiculous antics of 
William Gaxton, the great magician, employing Miss Pitts and Sum- 
merville as his assistants. Their actions backstage while playing big- 
time vaudeville are hilarious until they are inveigled into giving a 
demonstration of their tricks and psychic powers in the home of a 
wealthy widow desiring to receive a message from her late husband. 
Miss Pitts becomes a dumb seer who forgets her lines and by doing so 
uncovers a plot to kill the widow for her money. This makes the trio 
heroes instead of becoming exposed by conspirators as fakes. With such 
able players as Kay Johnson, Bruce Cabot, Ralph Morgan, Julie Haydon, 
Huntly Gordon and Tamara Geva, plus clever treatment, dialogue and 
direction, a pleasing bill of entertainment is made possible. Running 
time, 70 minutes. 

"Happy Landings" 

(Monogram) 

Hollywood, July 15. — This is a thoroughly entertaining independent 
production timed for action and speed, suspense and romance, all cen- 
tering around air pilots. 

The story deals with Ray Walker and Hyram Hoover, as flying 
lieutenants, both in love with Jacqueline Wells, daughter of the com- 
manding officer of their squadron. Through the medium of a gang of 
crooks, Walker is forced unwillingly to fly two bank robbers across the 
border. The remainder of the picture goes speedily from one episode 
to another following Walker's and Hoover's attempts at their capture and 
the final apprehension of the crooks, all including an automobile chase 
below the border and an airplane duel at sea. All ends favorably as 
Hoover steps aside for Walker in the favor of Miss Wells. 

The cast contributes to the picture, including Walker, Hoover, Miss 
Wells, William Farnum, as the colonel, and Noah Beery, as Miss Wells' 
father. R. N. Bradbury directed. 

It's a good independent program picture. Running time, 70 minutes. 



Myers Calls 
Cancellation 
"Red Herring" 

(Continued from page 1) 

really afford relief from the forced 
showing of current salacious pictures 
he would have permitted the cancella- 
tion of all pictures condemned by the 
Legion of Decency or other identified 
group. 

"The most that exhibitors will get 
out of the present plan will be an 
argument with the exchange managers 
which they are bound to lose, with 
possibly, an appeal to the producer- 
controlled grievance boards set up un- 
der the motion picture code." 

The opening paragraph of the state- 
ment reads : "It was to be expected 
that Will Hays, having brought down 
upon the theatres a nationwide boycott 
by his failure to enforce the rules of 
production, would take some action 
designed to divert attention from the 
charges now being made against him 
without reforming in any important 
particular the policies and practices 
of his employers, the motion picture 
producers." 

It continues : "As a matter of fact, 
the plan announced by Mr. Hays is 
merely temporary in character ; it does 
not apply to pictures released later 
than three days after the date of the 
announcement ; and its calculated 
vagueness casts the burden upon the 
exhibitors in many communities of or- 
ganizing 'concerted objection' to a 
given picture in order to gain the 
cancellation privilege and then leaves 
it to the producer to determine whether 
there is sufficient opposition to justify 
the exercise of that privilege." 



Saenger Offers Cut 
To 50 Days in N. 0. 

New Orleans, July IS. — Offer of 
Saenger Theatres to reduce its clear- 
ance to SO. days and a clearance plan 
submitted by major exchanges were 
the two principal developments of an 
open hearing held by the clearance and 
zoning board. 

The major exchanges offered the 
following clearance based on time ex- 
piring after conclusion of first run 
engagements : Second run, 45 days ; 
first subsequent run, 50 days ; second 
subsequent run, 95 days ; third subse- 
quent run, 110 days; 10-cent houses 
and premium houses, 270 days. The 
board went into executive session to 
consider this, but reached no decision. 

The board has included, besides 
New Orleans theatres, houses in Gret- 
na, Westwego and similar suburbans 
in one zone, designated as A. This is 
done in order to clarify the premium 
menace which is being worked on. 

Samuelson May Quit 
Jersey Leadership 

(Continued from page 1) 

Charnow, now vice-president, will be 
named. 

Leaders of eastern units will meet 
again shortly, the date to be set by 
Walter B. Littlefield, who is in charge 
of the region. The session will be 
held the latter part of the month. 
All members of eastern units have 
been invited to attend the Jersey con- 
vention. 



Campi Orders Quick 
Action on Clearance 

(Continued from page 1) 

protests reached code boards July 2. 
It so happens July 1 fell on a Sunday 
and no mail was delivered. 

After boards complete hearings on 
pending protests and schedules, they 
will adjourn until Nov. 1, unless called 
upon by Campi sooner. 

On and after Nov. 1 protests and 
new schedules can be filed for the 
1935-36 season. 

Although New York was regarded 
as a possible storm center for pro- 
tests on the present schedules, very- 
few complaints were filed. A few 
changes were made as a result, but 
no new schedule is on record. Sev- 
eral changes were made in New Jer- 
sey. One New York case came up 
last week, but it was left for further 
consideration, and one Long Island 
case, Jose Seider against Loew's Val- 
encia, comes up Wednesday. 

Exchange centers and surrounding 
cities which have already sent in sche- 
dules are : 

Miami, St. Petersburg, Cambridge 
and Wellesley, Mass. ; Buffalo, Cleve- 
land, Toledo, Texas, Denver, Little- 
ton, Colo. ; Detroit, Grand Rapids, 
Indianapolis, Louisville, Fort Wayne, 
New Castle, Ind. ; Richmond, Ind. ; 
Kansas City, St. Joseph, Wichita, At- 
chison, Kan. ; Los Angeles, New Ha- 
ven, Hartford, Bridgeport, Western 



Connecticut, Omaha, Portland, Ore. ; 
Salt Lake City and Provo, Utah ; 
Butte, Mont. ; San Jose, St. Louis, 
Olympia, Everett, Wenatchee, Wash- 
ington ; Memphis. 

This does not indicate the final 
list. Several cities have schedules filed 
before July 1, which have not been 
submitted. 



Rosenblatt West Soon 

Washington, July 15. ■ — Division 
Administrator Sol A. Rosenblatt plans 
to leave on his second coast trip within 
the next two weeks. He was in 
Philadelphia over the week-end on 
another of the codes under his super - 
vision. 



Politicians in Now 

Buffalo, July 15. — The Erie 
County Board of Supervisors has 
joined the "purge the movies" drive 
with approval of a resolution by Su- 
pervisor Harry J. Dixon, Democrat 
of Buffalo's second ward, expressing 
"resentment and distaste of present- 
day movies of a vulgar and lewd char- 
acter." 



Pa. Passes "Dr. Monica" 

Pittsburgh, July 15. — The Pennsyl- 
vania censors have finally passed "Dr. 
Monica," eliminating only 90 seconds 
of running time, it is reported. How- 
ever, they insisted upon a couple of 
other changes which have been made. 



Foreign Film 
To Get Close 
Code Scrutiny 



(Continued from page 1) 

his opinion, story, treatment or dia- 
logue do not conform to the tenets of 
the code. Hart will move for changes. 
He will also preview completed 
product and issue certificates and 
authorize the use of the agreed upon 
seal where product passes his in- 
spection. 

Where foreign pictures are con- 
cerned, it will obviously be difficult 
and, in many cases, impossible to 
change stories. However, editing and 
deletions will be enforced to make 
such pictures conform. 

Liberties Union in 
Move on Film Drive 

(Continued from page 1 ) 

community to clear up any possible 
uncertainty as to the aims and pur- 
poses of their activities. 

"To that end we believe these or- 
ganizations using the boycott and pub- 
licity should state immediately and 
specifically whether or not they favor 
the present existing censorship of mo- 
tion pictures in the several states 
where such censorship now exists by 
law. 

"In the absence of any construc- 
tive contribution by these self-ap- 
pointed organizations," the statement 
concludes, "we fear they are inevit- 
ably laying the foundation for a form 
of censorship either governmental or 
religious, not only of the movies, but 
of the stage, the radio, and books, 
magazines, and the press." 

Censors So Severe, 
Kansas Clergy Calm 

(Continued from page 1) 

of Concordia already has issued a call 
for Legion of Decency pledges, while 
Bishop Johannes of the large Leaven- 
worth diocese has announced he will 
shortly join in the campaign. There 
are estimated to be 120,000 Catholics 
in the state. 

While the Kansas board is known 
as one of the most severe in the coun- 
try, the present agitation has appar- 
ently had no effect on its decisions. 
The defenders of the state's morals 
have ordered numerous cuts and re- 
visions. 



Omaha Catholic Paper 
Printing Film Lists 

Omaha, July 15. — The True Voice, 
publication of the Omaha Catholic dio- 
cese, is now making it definite policy 
to print each week a list of objection- 
able and non-objectionable films as se- 
lected by the local standards commit- 
tee. Besides advocating boycotting 
films until they are cleaned up the 
paper is even campaigning against a 
local daily for its policy of advocating 
clean films on the front page and car- 
rying obscene advertising on films on 
its inside pages. 

Indorsement of the Legion of De- 
cency clean film drive is expected at 
the convention of the Walther League, 
which started here today, it was stated 
by Rev. Lawrence Acker, pastor of 
the First Lutheran Church. 



Monday, July 16, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



'Circus Clown' 
Pulls $3,000 
Denver Gross 



Denver, July 15. — About the only 
bright spot on the theatrical map last 
week was the Aladdin, which took 
$3,000, up by $500. on "The Circus 
Clown." 

The Denver did a par $6,000 on 
"The Life of Vergie Winters," and 
"Smarty" and "Finishing School," a 
dual, had a good $2,250 at the Para- 
mount. 

Total first run business was $19,250. 
Average is $20,500. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 12: 

"THE CIRCUS CLOWN" (F. N.) 

ALADDIN— (1.500). 2Sc-3Sc-50c, 7 days. 
Grcss: $3,000. (Average. $2,500) 

"KISS AND MAKE UP" (Para.) 
DEN HAM — (1.500). 25c-40c. 6 days. 
Grcsr: $2,500. (Average $4,000) 
"THE LIFE OF VERGIE WINTERS" 
(Radio) 

D EN BER— (2.500). 25c-35c-50c, 7 days. 
Crocs: $6,000. (Average. $6,000) 

"FCG OVER FRISCO" (F. N.) 
ORPHEUM— (2.600). 25c-35c-50c. 7 days. 
Gross: $5,500. (Average. $6,000) 
"SMARTY" (Warners) 
"FINISHING SCHOOL" (Radio) 
PARAMOUNT— (2.000), 25c-40c. 7 days. 
Gross: $2,250. (Average, $2,000). 



Grosses Off Badly 
In Montreal Spots 

Montreal. July 15. — Grosses were 
away off last week with thousands go- 
ing into the country. "Little Man, 
What Now?" and "The Merry 
Frinks" on a dual bill at the Capitol 
took $8,000, but this was $1,000 below- 
normal. 

The Princess reached a par $6,000 
on "Sisters Under the Skin" and "The 
Hell Cat." 

Total first run business was $34,500. 
Average is $43,000. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 7: 

"LITTLE MAN. WHAT NOW?" (Univ.) 
"THE MERRY FRINKS" (F. N.) 

CAPITOL— (2,547). 25c-35c-40c-50c-60c. 7 
Jays. Gross: $8,500. (Average. P9.000) 
"SPRINGTIME FOR HENRY" (Fox) 

"KEEP 'EM ROLLING" (Radio) 
IMPERIAL— (1.914). 25c -40c -50c. 7 days. 
Vaudeville: Three Rhythm Queens; Sher- 
man & McVey; Packard & Dodge; Wiora 
Stoney; Bert Fayle; George Downing; 
Lynn. Lewis & Hale; George Hunter. 
Gross: $5,500. (Average. $6,500) 

"LAUGHING BOY" (M-G-M) 
"HALF A SINNER" (Univ.) 
LOEW'S— (3.115). 25c-35c-50c-65c. 7 days. 
Gross: $6,500. (Average, $10,500) 

"WHEN SINNERS MEET" (Radio) 

"WILD GOLD" (Fox) 
PALACE— (2.600). 25c-35c-50c-60c-75c, 7 
days. Gross: $8,000. (Average, $11,000) 
"SISTERS UNDER THE SKIN" (Col.) 
"THE HELL CAT" (Col.) 
PRINCESS — (2,272). 25c-35c-50c-65c, 7 
days. Gross: $6,000. (Average, $6,000) 



Pickford to Buy Play 

Kansas City. July 15. — Passing 
through here on her way to take part 
in "Mary Pickford Day" at the 
World's Fair, Mary Pickford de- 
clared she planned to give the Broad- 
way plays the once-over, choosing one 
for her next picture. She said she 
planned to continue her writing for 
Good Housekeeping, begun last month. 
She termed as "very indefinite" reports 
she is to close a "deal for the publi- 
cation of a series of articles on Holly- 
wood. 



Variety Club Chatter 



Cincinnati 

Cincinnati, July 15. — The local 
club's first picnic will be held at 
Strickler's Grove, suburban, July 30. 
All proceeds are to go to the Film 
Board of Relief, according to Noah 
Schecter, Ralph Kinsler and El- 
mer Dressman, who comprise the 
picnic committee. 

Barker Bill Hastings, skipper of 
the RKO Lyric, was absent but ac- 
counted for a couple of days last week. 
The heat got him, and he spent his 
enforced vacation in bed. 

Col. Arthur Frudenfeld is wear- 
ing that homesick look. The better 
half is visiting in California. 

Manny Shure and Joe Goetz have 
returned from a fortnight's vacation 
with new enthusiasm and an inex- 
haustable supply of tall fish stories. 



Kansas City 

Kansas City, July 15. — Arrange- 
ments have been completed for the an- 
nual industry outing to be held July 
16 at the Ivanhoe Country Club, states 
A. H. Cole, general chairman. The 
affair is sponsored by the Motion Pic- 
ture Relief Fund and the Variety 
Club. 

The program is the most elaborate 
ever staged here and attendance is ex- 
pected to break all records. Golf will 
highlight the before noon "doings," 
and in the afternoon there will be a 
baseball game between exhibitors and 
exchangemen. Swimming, games and 
contests, a kangaroo court and im- 
promptu entertainment will make the 
day a full one. The evening will be 
given over to dancing and entertain- 
ment. 

At the club's monthly business meet- 
ing, the following general committee 
was announced : A. H. Cole, Para- 
mount, chairman; C. A. Schultz, 
Commonwealth Theatres ; Irwin Du- 
imnsky. Dubinsky Bros. Theatres; 
E. C. Rhoden, Fox Midwest Thea- 
tres; George Carrington, Erpi. 

Committees functioning for the day 
have been appointed by the Board of 
Trade as follows : 

Refreshments- -A. F. Baker, chairman; 
". R. Biechele, Ed Shanberg, Bill 
Althaus, Joe Manfre. 

Games and Contests — Harry Taylor. 
chairman; William Warner, Don Davis. 
Gus Diamond. F'inton Jones. 

Golf — William Benjamin. chairman: 
Harry Taylor, Harris P. Wolfberg, Jay 
Means. 

Kangaroo Court — Leland Hazard, judge: 
Edgar Jones, policeman. 

Doctors — George Knappenberger. Clif- 
ford L. Gilles. 

Law and Order — William Warner. 

Baseball — Martin Finkelstein, J. A. 
Lewis. Charles Vaughan, "Dusty" 
Rhodes. Harry Hays. 

Entertainment — I. Dubinsky, chairman; 
George Baker. Barney Joffee, Jack 
Gregory. 

Publicity — Leo Finkelstein, chairman; 
Paul Bayzman, Al Finestone. 



Concessions — Leo Finkelstein, chair- 
man; Jim States, John Muchmore. Paul 
LaRoche. 

Two girls from each office will be 
selected as hostesses to schedule games 
a.nd contests. The regular Monday 
luncheon meeting will be dispensed 
with for the day. 

New members recently receiving the 
"barker" degree are : Leland Hazard, 
I. T. O. attorney ; Dr. Clifford L. 
Gilles, and Martin Schiff, Univer- 
sal auditor. 

Before leaving for the East, Rev. 
R. W. Gardner, club chaplain, was 
presented a silver card signifying he 
was made an associate life member of 
the local tent. Cole made the present- 
ation, at a bon voyage party at the 
club. Another traveler is Sam 
Abend, on the high seas Europe- 
bound. 

Recent visitors have been Ben 
Blotcky, Paramount district man- 
ager, Minneapolis ; Julian King, 
Metro, Denver, and these Erpi men : 
J. L. Reynolds, New York ; R. Hil- 
ton, Chicago, and A. A. Ward, Dallas. 



Washington 

Washington, July 15. — The local 
Variety Club formally took its place 
among the family of tents when Na- 
tional Chief Barker John H. Harris. 
Pittsburgh, installed the officers. 

Assisting in the installation was Na- 
tional Orator A. K. Rowswell, Pitts- 
burgh. 

The officers are: John J. Payette, 
chief barker ; Rudolph Berger, first 
assistant chief barker ; J. Louis Rome, 
second assistant chief barker ; Harry 
Hunter, propertyman ; Sam A. Ga- 
lanty, wagonman ; and Carter T. 
Barron, A. Julian Brylawski, 
Charles Kranz, Joseph P. Morgan, 
William K. Saxton, and Samuel N. 
Wheeler, canvassmen. 

Following the induction into office, 
a reception and house warming was 
held in the club rooms in the Willard 
Hotel. 

Entertainment was furnished by 
Mary Brian, Gordon and King, the 
Radio Aces, and the Russian Revels. 
Benny Ross acted as master of cere- 
monies. 

More than 80 barkers flocked to the 
weekly luncheon, with J. Louis Rome 
and Edward Jacobs acting as kings 
for the day. 

Dr. M. Sayle Taylor, better known 
as radio's "The Voice of Experience," 
was guest of honor. 

Fred M. Heider, one-time vaudeville 
dancer, was appointed as steward. 

When the club meets Monday 
king for the day will be Brylawski 
and Berger will present Sol. A. 
Rosenblatt. 



To Get More Hitler Film Friedman in New Post 



Samuel Cummins, of Jewel Prod., 
left for London Saturday aboard the 
Aquitania to bring back scenes of the 
Berlin and Munich uprising against 
the Hitler government, claimed to have 
been taken on the spot by Cornelius 
Vanderbilt. Jr. The clips will be made 
part of "Hitler's Reign of Terror," 
which is now being shown in this 
country by Cummins, 



Pittsburgh, July 15. — Max Fried- 
man, chief booker for Warners here, 
has been promoted to the Albany zone 
where he will be in charge of buying 
as well as bookings. He has taken up 
his new duties. 

Harry Feinstein, Warner short 
booker in the local office, gets Fried- 
man's post. Feinstein's successor has 
not yet been named. 



' Gets 
Good $30,000 
At Boston Met 



Boston, July 15. — With the vaca- 
tion season getting into full swing, 
grosses fell off last week, but even so, 
'Dr. Monica," with a stage show at 
.he Metropolitan, reached $30,000, up 
by $2,000. 

"Of Human Bondage" was $2,000 
over par at $18,000 at Keith's, and 
' Murder in the Vanities" had a good 
$17,500 at Loew's State. 

Total first run business was $97,500. 
Average is $94,000. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing Tuly 12 : 

"COCKEYED CAVALIERS" (Radio) 
"LOVE CAPTIVE" (Univ.) 

BOSTON— (2.900), 25c-50c, 7 days. Gross: 
$16,000. (Average. $16,000) 
"RETURN OF THE TERROR" (F. N.) 

"KISS AND MAKE UP" (Para.) 
FENWAY— (1,800). 30c-50c, 7 days. Gross: 
$8,000. (Average, $9,000) 

"OF HUMAN BONDAGE" (Radio) 
KEITH'S— (3,500), 30c-50c, 7 days. Gross: 
$18,000. (Average, $16,000) 

"MURDER IN THE PRIVATE CAR" 
(M-G-M) 

LOEW'S STATE— (3,700), 35c-50c, 7 days. 
Gross: $17,500. (Average. $16,000) 

"DR. MONICA" (Warners) 
METROPOLITAN — (4,350), 30c-65c. 7 
days. Black and White Jamboree. Gross: 
$30,000. (Average, $28,000) 
"RETURN OF THE TERROR" (F. N.) 
"KISS AND MAKE UP" (Para.) 
PARAMOUNT — (1,800). 30c-50c, 7 days. 
Gross: $8,000. (Average, $9,000) 



"Scandal," "Nurse" 
Only Buffalo Draw 

Buffalo July 15. — "Private Scan- 
dal" and "Registered Nurse" at the 
Century were the only films to do 
normal business. The take was 
$6,000. Heat toward the end of the 
week offset a big week-end draw on 
"Shoot the Works." 

Total take was $31,100. Average 
is $34,800. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 13 : 

"THE CIRCUS CLOWN" (F. N.) 

BUFFALO — (3.500). 30c-55c. 7 days. 
Stage : Sid Gary; Wilbur Hall & Loretta 
Denr.iscn; Allen & Kent; Vera Wilcox; 
Maxine Louise Kisor & Co.. Gross: $12,000. 
'Average. $14,300) 

"PRIVATE SCANDAL" (Para.) 
"REGISTERED NURSE" (Warners) 
CENTURY— (3,000), 25c, 7 days. Gross: 
?6,000. Average, $6,000) 

"SHOOT THE WORKS" (Para.) 
HIPPODROME — (2,100), 25c-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $7,100. Average. $8,000) 

"LET'S BE RITZY" (Univ.) 
"MURDER ON THE CAMPUS" 
(First Division) 
LAFAYETTE — (3,300), 25c, 7 days. 
Gross: $6,000. (Average, $6,500. 



Col. Pushing New 
Season's Production 

Hollywood, July 15. — Clearing its 
decks of the last of the present sea- 
son's product, Columbia is in the midst 
of activity on its production program 
for 1934-35. 

"One Night of Love," the first for 
the new year, completed, the studio is 
now at work on "Broadway Bill," 
"The Girl Friend," "That's Grati- 
tude," "Spring 3100," "Sure Fire," 
"$25 an Hour" "Eight Bells" and 
"The Depths Below." 

"Girl in Danger." "Blind Date,'' 
"The Defense Rests," "Name the 
Woman" and "Beyond the Law" wind 
up the present season. 




"EG. U.S. PAT. Of F. 



Du Pont Film Manufacturing Corporation 



35 WEST 45™ STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 

PLANT • . . PARLIN, N. J. 



SMITH & ALLER LTD. 
6656 -SANTA MONICA BLVD. 
HOLLYWOOD, CAL. 



THECfflSPTRADE MARK HAS NEVER BEEN PLACED ON AN INFERIOR PRODUCT 



The Leading 
Daily 

,Newspaper|| 

Motion 
Picture 
Industry 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Alert, 
Intelligent 

Faith fut 
Service to 
the Industry 
in All 
Branches 



VOL. 36. NO. 13 



NEW YORK, TUESDAY, JULY 17, 1934 



TEN CENTS 



Strike Closes 
All Houses in 
San Francisco 



Loss in Receipts Will Be 
$50,000 Daily 

San Fkancisco, July 16. — All local 
theatres were dark today in the gen- 
eral strike which holds this city in 
its grip when projectionists, musi- 
cians and stagehands joined the walk- 
out. Closings are estimated at 200. 
Loss in receipts is expected to ap- 
proximate $50,000 daily, with more 
than 3,000 employes affected. 

It is understood no attempt will be 
made to operate theatres with non- 
union help, though the report has been 
confirmed that a private company 
plans opening the Tivoli, now dark, 
under protection. Managers are em- 
phatic that no attempt will be made 
(Continued on page 8) 



Chicago Expecting 
Few Cancellations 

Chicago, July 16. — Exchange man- 
agers here expect few cancellations on 
moral grounds as a result of the new 
privilege granted by major producers 
to enable exhibitors to avoid playing 
films against which there is an or- 
ganized protest. 

Some chiseling is predicted, but the 
feeling prevails that cancellations will 
be few on money-makers, even though 
objections are filed. 



Para. Audit Shows 
$15,500,000 Cash 

Paramount's cash position now 
stands at $15,500,000, it was revealed 
yesterday by audits recently com- 
pleted for the trustees for the debtor 
corporation. Unofficial estimates re- 
cently placed the company's cash on 
hand anywhere from $10,000,000 to 
§15,000,000. 

Allied Owners' Corp., one of the 
larger Paramount Publix creditors, 

(Continued on page 8) 



Kuykendall to Fight 
Non-Theatre Prizes 

Unfair competition from non-thea- 
trical as well as industry sources will 
Ibe combatted by Campi's unfair trade 
practice committee, Ed Kuykendall, 
committee chairman, stated yesterday 
in appealing to exhibitors to report 
local instances of unfair trade prac- 
ties of any description to his com- 
mittee. 

Kuykendall's statement points out 
(Continued on page 4) 



No Release Lapse Seen 
Due to Church Campaign 



Laemmle Asks Avoidance of 
Idea Clean Films Won H Hit 



Exhibitors can get by with clean 
pictures, but one of the troubles is 
theatre men take it for granted they 
cannot, declared Carl Laemmle in a 
statement issued yesterday. His re- 
marks later are to appear in Universal 
Weekly as one of his series of 
"Straight-from-the-Shoulder" talks. 

"Don't let the church drive get you 
down," warned Laemmle. 

"Don't take it for granted that clean 
pictures won't get by. 

"Universal in its long career has 
made 1,400 feature pictures which live 
up to today's strictest requirements for 
decency. We have slipped very sel- 
dom — and you made no more money 
when we slipped than when we didn't. 

"By what seems a strange coinci- 
dence Universal was the company to 
receive the first 'seal of purity.' There 
was a time when this would have been 
harmful to any picture, but let's live 



No Hyams Deal 

Deal whereby Paramount 
(British) would acquire the 
H. and G. Kinemas, operated 
in London suburbs by Phil 
Hyams and Major Gale, is 
reported off. 



London, July 16. — Phil 
Hyams, back from the States, 
again denies a deal had been 
talked with Paramount and 
repeats what he said in New 
York that his trip was a va- 
cation only. 



in the conditions of today and quit 
talking about yesterday. 
"It has become a custom in the pic- 

(Contimted on page 7) 



Denver Houses 
Rebel Against 
Code Rulings 



Denver, July 16. — Thirty-six of 40 
houses in the metropolitan area here 
have signed a manifesto pledging not 
to recognize Campi or the local code 
boards "unless and until radical and 
fundamental changes are made," giving 
the complaining exhibitors local "self- 
government" in their affairs. 

The rebellion against Campi and 
the local boards was brought to a 
head by a recent decision of the griev- 
ance board prohibiting bank nights, 
cash nights and country store nights 

(Continued on page 4) 



Pay Report May Be 
Issued This Week 

Washington, July 16. — The much- 
heralded salary report may be made 
public before the end of the current 
week, it was said today by Division 

(Continued on page 4) 



Protestants' 
Pledges Out 
In Few Days 



Clean film pledges in the form 
agreed upon last week by the Federal 
Council of Churches of Christ in 
America will go out next week, ac- 
cording to Rev. Dr. Worth M. Tippy. 
Bids for printing have been asked. 

Dr. Tippy expects "many millions" 
of them to be circulated. 

"The demand is spontaneous," he 
said. "Circulation of pledges among 
Protestant churches is already under 
way. It has been for the past two 
weeks among Presbyterians in Chica- 

(Continued on page 7) 



Cleveland Boycott 
Hits Neighborhoods 

Cleveland, July 16. — The drive for 
better pictures has not, so far, hurt 
downtown theatres, but neighborhood 
houses, especially those located in 

(Continued on page 7) 



Six-Week Supply Ready 
Before Code Clamps 
Began July 15 

With many releases for the next 
six weeks "in the house," previously 
approved under the production code 
prior to July 15, and production in 
Hollywood described as only "slightly 
subnormal" for this time of the year, 
major distributors yesterday were con- 
fident theatres faced no break in the 
flow of product because of the church 
campaign and studio precaution against 
material hitherto found objectionable. 

It is pretty much of an open secret 
that some pictures under or over the 
finish line by last Saturday midnight 
when "teeth" in Production Code Ad- 
ministration began to bite harder and 
more diligently than before have been 
turned back to writers and directors 
for rewriting or re-shooting of certain 

(Continued on page 7) 



Production Slows 
Further on Coast 

Hollywood, July 16.— Evidence that 
producers are continuing to slow down 
by carefully preparing new pictures to 
conform with demands of the reform 
movement is manifested in last week's 
survey of production. This check shows 
only 32 features and seven shorts in 
work as against 33 and 12 for the 
preceding week. 

The same indication of care applies 
to number of pictures in the final 

(Continued on page 7) 



Say Omaha Closing 
Due to Film Drive 

Omaha, July 16. — Church cam- 
paigning against objectionable pic- 
tures which has delayed release of 
the West picture, "Madame Du 
Barry" and "The Girl from Missouri" 
("Born to Be Kissed") is given as 
the reason for decision to darken the 
Paramount Wednesday night. Sum- 
mer doldrums may have something to 
do with it, but the house officially 
sticks to its story that it is a dearth 
of topnotch attractions which precipi- 
ated the move. 

This will mark the first time the 
house, Omaha's elite theatre, will 
close since its opening in 1927. Thirty 
people will be added to unemployment 
ranks. Manager Davidson stays one 
week beyond the shutdown to clean 
up detail. 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Tuesday, July 17, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



(Registered U. S. Patent Office) 



Vol. 36 



July 17, 1934 



No. 13 



Three Majors 
To Keep Dual 
Ban in Pacts 




Mabtin Quigley 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 
MAURICE KANN 

Editor 
JAMES A. CRON 
Advertising Manager 



Published daily except Sunday and holi- 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub- 
sidiary of Quigley Publications, Inc., 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 1790 Broadway, New 
York. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Cable ad- 
dress "Quigpubco, New York." All con- 
tents copyrighted 1934 by Motion Picture 
Daily, Inc. Address all correspondence to 
the New York Office. Other Quigley pub- 
lications: MOTION PICTURE HERALD, 
BETTER THEATRES, THE MOTION 
PICTURE ALMANAC and THE CHI- 
CAGOAN. „ _ _ . T . t 

Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Lite 
Building, Vine and Yucca Streets, Victor 
M. Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 407 
South Dearborn Street, Edwin S. Clif- 
ford, manager; London Bureau: Remo 
House, 310 Regent St., London, W. 1, 
Bruce Allan, Representative. Cable address: 
"Ouigpubco, London"; Berlin Bureau: 
Berlin - Tempelhof , Kaiserin - Augustastrasse 
28, Joachim K. Rutenberg, Representative; 
Paris Bureau: 19, Rue de la Cour des- 
Noues, Pierre Autre, Representative; Rome 
Bureau: Viale Gorizia, Vittorio Malpassuti, 
Representative; Sydney Bureau: 102 Sus- 
sex Street, Cliff Holt, Representative; Mex- 
ico City Bureau: Apartado 269, James 
Lockhart, Representative; Glasgow Bureau: 
86 Dundrennan Road, G. Holmes, Repre- 
sentative; Budapest Bureau: 11 Olasz 
Fasor 17, Endre Hevesi, Representative. 

Entered as second class matter January 
4, 1926 at the Post Office at New Yerk 
City, N. Y., under Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada $15 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 



Scout Serial Deal Set 

George Stout and Ben Cohen of 
Romance Prod., Inc., are here from 
Hollywood for conferences with 
Harry Thomas, head of First Divi- 
sion, on distribution of "Young 
Eagles," a Boy Scout serial recently 
completed by Romance. First Divi- 
sion will handle the picture in 60 per 
cent of the territory and state righters 
in the remainder, it was stated. Stout 
and Cohen return to the coast by 
automobile this week. 



Latin Writers to Dine 

The Paramount International Corp 
will be host to New York correspon- 
dents for Latin-American publications 
at a luncheon today at Sardi's. Among 
those present will be George Weltner 
and Albert Deane of Paramount In- 
ternational, Jack Alicoate of Film 
Daily, Red Kann of Motion Picture 
Daily, Wolfe Kaufman of Variety 
and J. P. McKnight of the Associated 
Press. 



Hicks Sailing Tomorrow 

John W. Hicks, Jr., vice-president 
of Paramount International Corp., to- 
morrow leaves for London aboard the 
Manhattan on his semi-annual inspec 
tion tour of England and the Conti 
nent. He will be away about two 
months. 



Dietz on the Mend 

Howard Dietz, director of adver 
tising and publicity for M-G-M, is 
recovering from an attack of arthritis 
and removal of his tonsils at Doctors' 
Hospital. He expects to be discharged 
this week. 



Clauses in Warner, M-G-M and 
Paramount contracts banning double 
featuring of the product of those com- 
panies have been retained in the new 
season contract forms, but will not be 
enforced in areas where there is no 
opposition to the dual policy, it was 
learned yesterday. 

In Chicago, Cleveland and other 
centers where anti-dual feeling is 
strong, the clauses will be rigidly en- 
forced. So far as could be learned 
the contracts of these three companies 
are the only ones containing anti- 
double featuring provisions. The 
clauses are carryovers from other 
seasons, having been included in the 
companies' contracts for several sea- 
sons past. 



Trent Carr Improved 

Hollywood, July 16. — Condition of 
Trem Carr, who has been enfined to 
the Cedars of Lebanon Hospital for 
a month following a major operation, 
is so improved he will be able to 
leave the hospital this week. 

Hans Schwartz, Fox director, un- 
derwent an operation for appendici- 
tis at the Cedars of Lebanon Hos- 
pital. Dr. Maurice Kahn performed 
the operation. 



Canal Film on Tap 

Hollywood, July 16. — Warners are 
making elaborate plans for early film- 
ing of a yarn dealing with the build- 
ing of the Panama Canal. The two 
major characterizations will be Maj. 
Gen. George W. Goethals, the engi- 
neer, and Dr. William C. Gorgas. 
Paul Muni is tentatively lined up for 
one of the roles. 



Not Bankrupt — Keaton 

Paris, July 16. — That he was 
bankrupt was denied here today by 
Buster Keaton. He termed the report 
that a petition in bankruptcy had been 
filed in his behalf in Los Angeles as 
a "complete surprise." He said he 
had given his attorney no authority 
to take such action. 



Newsreel Plan Out 



By BRUCE ALLAN 
London, July 16. — The 
newsreel idea, officially 
sponsored by the Cinemato- 
graph Exhibitors' Ass'n, has 
been stepped on by the gen- 
eral purposes committee of 
the organization. 



Await French Moves 
Under Herriot Rule 

Developments in the new French 
film structure with the appointment of 
Edouard Herriot, former premier and 
now minister without portfolio as the 
head of the new commission in charge 
of the government's relations with the 
film industry, are being awaited with 
curiosity at the Hays office. 

"This is an entirely new departure," 
said Major Frederick L. Herron, in 
charge of foreign relations at the 
Hays office, "and it will be a short 
while yet before we will be able to 
tell just what affect the new move will 
have on American interests in France. 

"Premier Herriot," he continued, 
"is supposed to be decidedly pro- 
American, but it was during his re- 
gime that most of the penalties were 
imposed on American products enter- 
ing France." 



Fields-Leroy Again 

Hollywood, July 16. — Paramount is 
renewing the W. C. Fields-Baby Le- 
roy team in "The Old Spinning 
Wheel." Paul Gerard Smith is now 
working on the adaptation. The 
youngster has also been sported in the 
Damon Runyon yarn, "The Lemon 
Drop Kid." 



Buzzell Marries Aug. 10 

Hollywood, July 16. — Eddie Buz- 
zell's marriage to Sarah Clark is set 
for Aug. 10. The couple will honey- 
moon in Honolulu. 



Jack Cohn Is Back 

Jack Cohn, Columbia vice-presi- 
dent, gets into town from the coast 
this morning. Nate Spingold is with 
him. 



Mascot Starts Tomorrow 

Hollywood, July 16. — The starting 
date on Mascot's "Crimson Romance" 
has been set for Wednesday. Dave 
Howard will direct. 



All Issues on Big Board Down 

Net 

High Low Close Change 

Columbia Pictures, vtc 27% 27% 27% — % 

Consolidated Film Industries, pfd 13% 13 13 — 54 

Eastman Kodak 99 97% 97% —1% 

Fox Film "A" 1254 1154 lljjj —1 

Loew's, Inc 27% 26% 26% —1% 

Paramount Publix, cts 354 3% 3% — 54 

Pathe Exchange "A" 19% 19J4 V)% — 54 

RKO 254 2 2 — % 

Warner Bros 4% 4% 4% — 54 

Technicolor Gains Vs on Curb 

Net 

High Low Close Change 

Technicolor 1354 1356 13>4 + % 

Paramount Publix Bonds Off Z A 

Net 

High Low Close Change 

General Theatre Equipment 6s '40 7 7 — % 

Keith B. F. 6s '46 6754 6754 6754 

Loew's 6s '41, ww deb rights 100% 100^ 100% — 54 

Paramount Broadway 554s '51 4054 40 4054 +54 

Paramount Publix 554s '50 47*£ 47 47 — % 

Pathe 7s '37, ww 99% 99% 99% +54 

Warner Bros. 6s '39, wd 5354 5354 5354 — 54 



Sale? 

100 
100 
800 
400 

1.300 
700 
200 
100 

1.400 



Sales 
*00 



Sales 
2 
1 
1 

3 
2 



< Purely 
Personal ► 

Frank C. Walker, Eddie Dowling 
and Colvin Brown combined for 
lunch at the Tavern yesterday. An- 
other threesome was Maury Cohen 
of Invincible, George Batcheller of 
Chesterfield and Ralph Poucher of 
Consolidated. Among others, as well, 
were Harry Arthur, King Charney, 
Bill German. 

Joe Weil, now abroad with Carl 
Laemmle, postcards from Wien, Vi- 
enna to you : "All well on the western 
front. Vienna film people gave C. L. 
a fine reception on his arrival. Feeling 
fit, but miss the handball and riding." 
Handball and riding refer to Weil, of 
course, not Laemmle. 

Gloria Hatrick, daughter of Ed- 
gar B. Hatrick, general manager of 
the William Randolph Hearst film in- 
terests, is winner of a society girl 
beauty contest, held at the Westchester 
Country club the other day. 

A. H. Van Buren is putting the 
finishing touches on the script of "The 
Voice Within" with A. W. Pezet and 
expects to get started directing within 
a week. It will be produced for 
Franklin and Stoner in New York. 

Charles L. Clifford's "Soldier 
Woman" has been purchased by Para- 
mount for Carole Lombard. She will 
also do Damon Runyon's "Maybe a 
Queen." 

Robert Donat, young English stage 
and screen star who just finished work 
in "The Count of Monte Cristo," ar- 
rived in town yesterday. He sails for 
England, Saturday. 

"Peg" Mahoney, secretary to 
Jack McIxerney at the Paramount 
Theatre, is back from a two weeks' 
vacation in Miami. 

Al Adams, of U. A., for the first 
time in his life broke 100. He shot 
a 97 over the week-end at Grassy 
Sprain in Westchester. 

Ruby Keeler expects to leave for 
the coast next Monday to begin work 
in "Flirtation Walk" for Warners. 

Howard J. Green, Paramount 
writer, will have a play, "Happy End- 
ing," produced on Broadway this fall. 

Charles R. Rogers arrived from 
the coast yesterday via the canal and 
went to Boston for a couple of days. 

Mike Beck has returned after a six- 
week vacation trip in South America. 
That haircut he sports is a corker. 

William Gluck has been named 
sales manager for the Amusement 
Supply Co. 

B. B. de Colmont, French screen 
writer, arrives today on the Paris. 



Starr, "U" Producer 

Hollywood, July 16. — Irving Starr, 
formerly associated with Reliance, 
has been engaged by Universal to act 
as associate producer for the series of 
six Buck Jones features, first of which 
will be "Rocky Rhodes." 

Universal is rounding up a preten- 
tious cast for its next musical, "Wake 
Up and Dream." So far it contains 
Russ Columbo, June Knight, Roger 
Pryor, Matt McHugh, Spencer Char- 
ters, Philip Dakin, Constance Kent, 
Eddie Prinz, Andy Devine and Henry 
Armetta. Kurt Neumann is directing. 



4 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Tuesday, July 17. 1934 



Denver Houses 
Rebel Against 
Code Rulings 



(Continued from page 1) 

while it dismissed a complaint against 
Harry Huffman, circuit operator, 
based on a weekly automobile give- 
away at one of his theatres. 

The complaint against Huffman was 
dismissed for lack of evidence. A ticket 
used in the drawing was the only 
evidence submitted, and, while the 
methods used in the giveaway stunt 
are common knowledge in Denver, 
none of the complainants at the hear- 
ing would testify. 

Local exhibitors claim the griev- 
ance board has no jurisdiction under 
the code to pass on giveaways and 
lotteries until 75 per cent of affiliated 
and unaffiliated exhibitors agree in 
writing that the practices should be 
stopped. 

The manifesto signed by the 36 ex- 
hibitors was addressed to Code Au- 
thority at New York. Its text fol- 
lows : 

"We the undersigned, being the man- 
agers, owners and operators of 80 per cent 
of the theatres in the metropolitan area 
of Denver, hereby serve notice upon you, 
and upon your so-called local grievance 
board in this territory, that we shall no 
longer recognize you or your grievance 
board, unless and until radical and funda- 
mental changes are made whereby the 
empty promises given us to the effect that 
our affairs would be a matter of local self- 
government are in some measure complied 
with. 

"To Continue as We See Fit" 

"As American citizens, we are not de- 
pendent upon you or upon any of your so- 
called boards or bureaus for our right to 
carry on our business, and we intend to 
continue as we see fit. without any further 
oppression, intermeddling or dictation. 

"We are weary of having the so-called 
code of fair competition used as a mere 
weapon of discrimination, scheming and op- 
pression, undertaking to impose upon us 
views and policies of others who have in- 
vested no money, taken no risks and ren- 
dered no services in our respective private 
businesses. 

"Some of us are at present aggrieved by 
a ridiculous ruling of your so-called griev- 
ance board in flat contradiction to the terms 
and intentions of the code. 

"We denounce such travesties of justice 
as that involved in the so-called hearing here 
of July 9, 1934. 

"The travesty of justice which allows a 
board to attempt to permit or forbid certain 
practices in the absence of a vote of ex- 
hibitors passing upon such methods, is sug- 
gestive of the methods of the OGPU in 
Russia, but is repulsive to every principle 
of American justice and fair dealing. The 
rules attempted to be laid down in the code 
and in your instructions and regulations to 
local boards were wholly flouted and ignored. 

"Other meddlesome and oppressive prac- 
tices and usurpations, purporting to be made 
under code authority, have convinced us that 
we should stand upon our rights as citizens 
engaged in lawful business, and shake off 
all un-American, arbitrary and ridiciulous 
dictation. 

"Those of us who have signed the code 
in question are not changing our status, one 
way or another, by signing this statement 
and warning to you. 

"Those of us who have not signed the code, 
wish it distinctly understood that, by giving 
you this warning and ultimatum, we are in 
no sense recognizing you, or the NRA, or 
any local board, or the so-called code of 
fair competition for the motion picture in- 
dustry, as having any authority whatsoever 
over us in any manner or form, but are 
giving you this notice so that, if you shall 
see fit to bring your local activities and 
those of your local grievance board into 
line with reason, fair dealing and Bound 
principles, we shall then consider what meas- 
ure of recognition or participation we are at 
liberty to give you. 

"Unless and until that is done, we shall 



"Knits to You!" 

Hollywood, July 16. — When 
Mary Boland knits, she knits; 
and it can't be called by any 
other name. 

A Paramount guide show- 
ing a visitor through the 
studio reached the "Pursuit 
to Happiness" set and pointed 
out Miss Boland busy on a 
sweater between scenes. 

"She crochets, too," whis- 
pered the guide. 

"Knits to you," explained 
Miss Boland. 



henceforth refuse to submit in any way, 
either as complainants, defendants, witnesses 
or otherwise, to the arbitrary, officious and 
unauthorized dictation or intermeddling of 
any local board in this area." 

The manifesto was signed by the 
Navajo, Rialto at Brighton, Associ- 
ated Theatres, Inc., Isis, Granada, 
Egyptian, Oriental, Amusement En- 
terprises, Inc., Alpine, Mission, Wash- 
ington Park, Gothic, Grand at Little- 
ton, Majestic, Mayan, State, Santa 
Fe, Jewel, Zaza, Victory, Capitol, Ri- 
voli, Gem, Plaza, Palace, Comet, Rex, 
Gem at Golden, Denver, Paramount, 
Orpheum, Aladdin, Tabor, Rialto, 
Bluebird, Bideawee, and the Arvada 
at Arvada. 



No copy of the Denver exhibitors' 
manifesto has been received by Code 
Authority nor has that body received 
any official notification of the action 
taken in Denver, John C. Flinn, execu- 
tive secretary, said yesterday. 



Kuykendall to Fight 
Non-Theatre Prizes 

(Continued from pane 1) 

that while the code restricts exhibi- 
tors from conducting lotteries and im- 
poses other limitations of a similar 
nature, lotteries and prize drawings 
are being given by tent shows and 
carnivals, baseball parks give away 
automobiles and free performances are 
staged in public parks and halls. All 
of these enterprises, Kuykendall points 
out, are direct competition for the- 
atres in most instances but can be 
stopped, he said, if exhibitors cooper- 
ate with the Campi committee by re- 
porting them promptly. 

Bank Nights Ruled 
Out in Los Angeles 

Los Angeles, July 16. — Bank nights 
have been ruled out here by the 
grievance board. The complaint was 
brought by the Mission Amusement 
Co. against the Ventura Theatre and 
Rennie Theatre, San Fernando. The 
board's order is effective in seven days. 

Protests scheduled for tomorrow 
involve theatres in Oxnard, Garfield, 
Long Beach, Alhambra, Brentwood, 
Coronado, Yosemite and Los Angeles. 



Honor Pizor at Dinner 

Philadelphia, July 16. — Two hun- 
dred film men joined tonight to honor 
Lewen Pizor, retiring president of the 
M.P.T.O. of Eastern Pennsylvania, 
Southern New Jersey and Delaware, 
at a Bellevue-Stratford dinner. Louis 
Nizer was master of ceremonies and 
Ed Kuykendall, president of the na- 
tional M.P.T.O.A., was in attendance. 



Barck 10-Cent Case 
Going Up to Campi 

Cleveland, July 16. — Campi is to 
be asked to decide the demand of S. 
H. Barck, Market Square Theatre, 
that he be allowed to show films at 
10 cents on the ground that he is last 
run in his zone and follows houses 
charging 20 cents and 15 cents. Barck 
claims he cannot perform his 15-cent 
contracts without going out of business. 

The complaint was directed against 
all houses charging 15 cents which 
have protested his 10-cent policy and 
also all distributors. Barck wanted 
this opposition declared an unfair 
trade practice. He cited in his com- 
plaint that 10-cent scales are allowed 
outside of Cleveland. 

Screeno Complaints 
Upheld in Chicago 

Chicago, July 16. — A dozen com- 
paints against theatres using the game 
Screeno have been upheld by the lo- 
cal grievance board which had pre- 
viously branded the stunt as a lottery. 
The inventor has indicated he will 
take the matter up with Code Author- 
ity. He contends that Screeno is a 
game of skill and not of chance. 

Screeno is the old game variously 
known under the name of Lotto, 
Keeno, Corno, Bunko, etc. In theatres 
patrons are given a card to punch 
while numbers are flashed on a dial 
faced clock operated from the pro- 
jection room. 

Claim Chicago Rule 
Favoring Giveaways 

Chicago, July 16. — According to Ed 
Brunnell, one of the leaders of the 
Independent Theatre Owners' Ass'n, 
a ruling has been obtained from the 
corporation counsel's office, saying 
giveaways to all patrons of a theatre 
are not in violation of the city ordi- 
nances. 

Brunnell retained Charles Bellows, 
former assistant state attorney, to 
handle the matter in behalf of his 
membership. Bellows reports that 
Lieut. Harry Costello has agreed not 
to interfere with giveaways where all 
men and women entering theatres are 
recipients of giveaways of equal value. 

Pay Report May Be 
Issued This Week 

(Continued from pane 1) 

Administrator Sol A. Rosenblatt. 
With the report will be a digest, set- 
ting forth concisely the pertinent facts 
developed by the long investigation. 
What recommendations will be made 
as a result of the study has not been 
divulged. 



N. O. Clearances Set 

New Orleans, July 16. — The clear- 
ance and zoning board has adopted the 
following clearances : First runs, 50 
days ; second runs in commercial area, 
35 days for A houses, 80 days for B 
houses ; first subsequent runs, 30 days ; 
second subsequent runs, 21 days; third 
subsequent runs, 15 days ; 10-cent 
houses, 320 days after first run. 



Miller on Appeals 

Buffalo, July 16. — Dave Miller, 
manager of the Buffalo Universal ex- 
change, president of the Buffalo Film 
Board of Trade and chief barker of 
Variety Club, has been appointed to 
the Campi appeals board. 



Appeals Body 
To Hear Only 
Specific Cases 



Washington, July 16. — Complaints 
of a general nature against the film 
and other codes will receive no con- 
sideration from the Industrial Ap- 
peals Board of the National Recov- 
ery Administration, which begins op- 
erations August 1, it was indicated to- 
day. 

With appointment of Mgr. John 
Augustine Ryan, professor of social 
ethics at the Catholic University, 
Washington, the personnel of the 
board, which succeeds the National 
Recovery Review Board headed by 
Clarence Darrow, has been completed. 
The other members of the board will 
be Amos J. Peaslee, former chief of 
the NRA Compliance Division, who 
will serve as chairman, and John S. 
Clement, president of a Philadelphia 
floor covering concern. 

The new group will receive from 
administrative officials such complaints 
against the NRA as they cannot them- 
selves correct. Likewise, should any 
action of a code authority be alleged 
to bear unjustly upon a business or- 
ganization, failing redress by the code 
authority, the matter will be taken up 
with the deputy administrator in 
charge to be forwarded to the board. 

It was stressed that the board will 
have no direct connection with in- 
dustry, but its appellate character will 
follow within the administrative setup 
of the administration, thus in a sense 
combining quasi-judicial processes, 
such as those of the Federal Trade 
Commission, with those of the recent- 
ly abolished National Compliance 
Board. 

In cases of complaints by small 
businesses the new board may recom- 
mend the granting of relief by exemp- 
tions, exceptions or modifications of 

codes. 

Committee to Study 
Operator Salaries 

Washington, July 16. — Withdraw- 
al of Donald K. Wallace and Daniel 
Bertrand of the Research and Plan- 
ning Division of the National Recov- 
ery Administration from their inves- 
tigation of operators' and stagehands' 
pay in New York, because of the 
length of time which promises to be 
required for the study, and appoint- 
ment of a special committee to carry 
on the work was announced today by 
Division Administrator Sol A. Rosen- 
blatt. 

The committee, of which L. E. 
Thompson of RKO will be chair- 
man, will consist of Charles Mos- 
cowitz, of Loew's, Charles L. O'Reilly, 
Harry Brandt, George Brown, presi- 
dent of the I. A. T. S. E., and Jo- 
seph Blatt of the Empire State Oper- 
ators' Union. 

The services of any member of the 
NRA will be at the disposal of the 
committee, if required, Rosenblatt 
said. 



Capital Zoning Settled 

Washington, July 16. — Clearance 
and zoning for the coming season 
were settled by the local board at its 
final session today. 



\ 











From the immortal 
adventure romance by 

ROBERT 
LOUIS 
STEVENSON 

Whose "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. 
Hyde'' is long remembered 
by film audiences 
Directed by 

VICTOR FLEMING 

Produced by 

HUNT STROMBERG 



Two million copies of Robert Louis 
Stevenson's beloved classic have quickened 
e heart-beat of men, women and children 
through the years. A vast audience awaits 
Wallace Beery, Jackie Cooper invoking 
again tne tear-dimmed sentiment of their 
previous triumph in "The Champ." Clear 
the decks for\a mighty entertainment! 





Tuesday, July 17, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



7 



Laemmle Asks Avoidance of 
Idea Clean Films Won H Hit 



{Continued 

ture industry to blame the success of 
off-color pictures on the public — and, 
of course, that's where the blame really 
lies. The public has always grabbed 
more quickly at suggestive books, 
suggestive plays and suggestive pic- 
tures than it has at the other kind. 

"But let's be alert enough to change 
with the times. 

"Let's use just a little more brain 
power and put as much entertain- 
ment into perfectly clean pictures as 
we ever tried to put into the ques- 
tionable ones — and when I say 'ques- 
tionable,' I mean questioned by even a 
small part of the general public. 

"The picture business is not going 
to the dogs just because there is a 
drive against its worst part. Maybe 
the drive is a good thing. Maybe it 
will awaken all of us to responsibil- 
ities which we never realized were 
ours. 



from page 1) 

"Let's not become fanatic about it. 
Let's adjust ourselves to today's con- 
ditions and give the public the kind of 
fare it can consume without moral 
indigestion. 

"Let's get back of this class of pro- 
duct with all the vim and vitality 
and guts that made the picture busi- 
ness a factor in the world's entertain- 
ment program. 

"We'll all be happier for it. We'll 
feel cleaner. And, last but not least, 
we'll be building on a more solid 
foundation than we ever had before. 

"The church as a whole is very 
decent. It has its fanatics and its nuts, 
but so have we. 

"Let's show the right thinking ele- 
ment of the church that we are as 
decent at heart as they are — and in do- 
ing it, let's prove that we never have 
to descend to the gutter to find profit- 
able material." 



No Shortage 
Seen Due to 
Film Drives 



(Continued from payc 1) 
sequences. Outstanding has been the 
Mae West picture. In second place, 
probably, was "Madame Du Barry," 
which Warners now anticipate re- 
leasing in a few weeks. Third was 
the Harlow picture, "Born to Be 
Kissed," which has been retitled "The 
Girl from Missouri." 

Prior to the deadline, however, there 
was a group of pictures which had 
passed through the milder production 
code formula, and, therefore, are now 
ready for the market. 

Most companies declare themselves 
set until the end of August. 

By that time, pictures now in work 
are expected to be ready. With pro- 
duction continuous thereafter, the un- 
animous opinion was pictures will 
reach theatres as scheduled. Not ad- 
mitted, but understood a fact, never- 
theless, is a shift in attractions be- 
cause of setbacks made necessary by 
more strict conformance to the code 
which is in effect in all major studios 
and with all major companies. 

As an indication of how the majors 
stand on product availabilities is the 
following data, supplied by them yes- 
terday : 

Columbia 

This company has "The Defense 
Rests," "Whom the Gods Destroy," 
and "Black Moon" ready. In some 
spots, the pictures are now running. 
"Black Moon," for instance, has 
played the Rialto, New York, while 
"Whom the Gods Destroy" is current 
at the Music Hall. 

Ready as its opener for the new sea- 
son is "One Night of Love," starring 
Grace Moore. These pictures have 
been approved under the old code 
machinery. 

"Name the Woman," "Girl in Dan- 
ger," "Beyond the Law," and "Blind 
Date" are either cutting or in the 
"lab." They have yet to get their 
code endorsement. 

Columbia says it is set until the 
middle of August. 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

According to Felix F. Feist, gen- 
eral sales manager, M-G-M is in the 
clear until August 31 with "Paris 
Interlude," "Student Tour," "Treas- 
ure Island," "Four Walls," which will 
be retitled "The Street Called 
Straight," and "Chained." The latter 
is in production. Feist says changes, 
if any, to meet code requirements can 
and will be made as the picture is 
shooting. 

Paramount 

"The Old-Fashioned Way" and 
"Elmer and Elsie" virtually round out 
this company's 1933-34 program. Its 
officials state "Ladies Should Listen," 
"She Loves Me Not," "The Scarlet 
Empress," "You Belong to Me" — all 
1934-35 releases — are finished and 
awaiting release. The West picture, 
of course, is not. 

Radio 

Current releases at Radio include 
"Of Human Bondage," "The Life of 
Vergie Winters," "We're Rich Again," 

(Continued on page 8) 



Production Slows 
Further on Coast 

(Continued from page 1) 
stages of preparation. In this division 
there are but 20 features and eight 
shorts scheduled to start within the 
fortnight. There are 41 features and 
15 shorts in the cutting rooms. 

Warners head the list with seven 
features in work, one preparing and 
six editing ; Fox has four, three and 
four; Universal, four, one and three; 
M-G-M, three, four and 13; Para- 
mount, three, three and one ; Goldwyn, 
two, zero and zero ; Columbia, two, 
three and five ; Radio, two, one and 
two, while the independents have a 
total of five, four and seven. 

In the short subject division M-G-M 
has two in work, two preparing and 
three editing ; Universal, zero, zero 
and two ; Columbia, one, one and 
three; Radio, one, two and two, while 
the independents have three, three and 
five. 



Aim Not to Destroy 
Films, Says Editor 

Discussing the Catholic drive for 
clean films in The Brooklyn Tablet, a 
religious weekly, Patrick F. Scanlan, 
managing editor, says : "We have no 
desire to destroy the motion picture 
business." 

In a front page editorial he goes on : 
"For five years we have weekly 
printed a review of the better pic- 
tures. We believe pictures have splen- 
did educational and recreational pos- 
sibilities and that, largely, these possi- 
bilities have been realized. But the 
evil character of many pictures and 
the low standards of parts of others 
have had a demoralizing effect on the 
people, an effect which is generally 
recognized by nearly everyone. 

"We are not hostile to the enter- 
tainment business ; we are not pro- 
hibitionists ; we are not prudes ; we 
are not asking a national censorship 
of films ; we are not demanding the 
impossible. What we ask is whole- 
someness instead of vulgarity and 
worse. We believe the subject matter 
and the possibilities of good entertain- 
ment are limitless. We are not de- 



manding 'goody-goody',' Pollyanna, 
crimeless or sexless pictures. Sex is 
a good and honorable word, but many 
writers and producers have sought to 
make it a bad word. They have as- 
sociated only sin with it. We are 
attacking indecency and vileness and 
the better producers know what we 
mean. We believe that in insisting 
upon ethics — which every good busi- 
ness has in its program — we are do- 
ing a service not only for morality 
and civic progress but for legitimate 
business." 

Washington's Synod 
Joins Film Attacks 

Seattle, July 16. — Block booking 
and "obscene" films came in for cen- 
sure at the closing session of the 
Presbyterian Synod. The following 
resolution was adopted : 

"The motion picture industry is under 
the control of men who spurn and ignore 
purpose of the church and the moral wel- 
fare of American citizens. Its predomi- 
nant if not sole motive is gain and not the 
providing of constructive amusements for 
the enjoyment and inspiration of the people. 

"It has given itself in a most flagrant 
manner to the stimulation and exploita- 
tion of the baser instincts of men, thus 
becoming a demoralizing influence espe- 
cially harmfuld to childhood and youth. 

"Therefore, we, the Synod of Washington, 
do hereby and now put ourselves on record 
as strongly opposed to the movie indus- 
try as it now is, denouncing as viciously 
arbitrary and harmful the practice of 'block 
booking' and pledge ourselves to cooper- 
ate with other agencies of similar mind and 
purpose, namely, the cleansing of the in- 
dustry of obscene and evil exhibitions, and 
strongly urge the people of our congrega- 
tions not to patronize the movies until 
such time when the industry guarantees 
to furnish a class of plays that will not 
bring the blush of shame to the cheeks 
of pure-minded men and women." 

Rabbi Goldstein Says 
Jews Will Help Drive 

Rabbi Sidney E. Goldstein, as the 
representative of the Central Confer- 
ence of American Rabbis, has pledged 
the cooperation of Jewish groups with 
the Catholic and Protestant campaign 
for improved pictures. 

His formal statement added that 
Jewish groups would work for the 
establishment of a permanent com- 
mittee, on which the clergy and the 
public would be represented with the 
producers, to take over the moral 
supervision of the films now per- 
formed by the Hays office. 



Protestants' 
Pledges Out 
In Few Days 



(Continued from page 1) 

go, and among councils of churches 
in Rochester and other cities. In Chi- 
cago alone 100,000 pledges have been 
circulated. 

"We prefer to have churches cir- 
culate their own pledges and have 
them printed locally, but we have 
many requests for bulk allotments. 
We will charge enough for these to 
cover the expense of printing and 
shipment." 

No further meetings are scheduled 
under the auspices of the Federal 
Council, Dr. Tippy said. 



Cleveland Boycott 
Hits Neighborhoods 

(Continued from page 1) 

the Catholic parishes, are suffering 
greatly. 

A. E. Ptak, owner of the Lyceum, 
which plays to a 60 per cent Catholic 
audience, reports that the bottom has 
dropped out of business since the drive 
! got under way. Not only do his 
former patrons stay away from pic- 
tures not approved by the church, but 
they are boycotting the theatre en- 
tirely, presumably because some of the 
pictures he shows are not on the ap- 
proved list. They are not supporting 
ithe "approved" pictures. 



Wisconsin Clergymen 
Join in Film Moves 

Milwaukee, July 16. — Rev. John 
Frederick Fedders, pastor of Lake 
Park Lutheran church and a leader 
in local and national church circles, 
has urged Lutheran young people to 
join the crusade of the churches for 
clean films. 

He declared that the crusade of the 
Legion of Decency is "a belated cam- 
paign which ought to have been under- 
taken years ago with churches, 
women's clubs and young people's or- 
ganizations co-operating." 
! Bishop J. Ralph Magee, in charge 
Of the St. Paul area of the Methodist 
church, which embraces four states, 
including Wisconsin, is preparing to 
order his district superintendents to 
take an active part in the campaign. 

Dr. Robert B. Stansell, superinten- 
dent of the Milwaukee district, made 
this statement following a cabinet con- 
ference with Bishop Magee at Fond 
du Lac, Wis. 



Philadelphia Unions 
Ask Boycott Change 

Philadelphia, July 16. — A demand 
that the church boycott in this terri- 
tory be modified has been made by 
the Musicians' Protective Ass'n., 
Local 77, and the Central Labor 
Union of Philadelphia. 

The association asks that "only ob- 
jectionable pictures be boycotted, and 
not theatres," adding that "the boy- 
cotting of the theatres has the effect 
of throwing people out of work by 
closing them." The other labor group 
demands that the boycott be confined 
to "the restricting of lewd and repul- 
sive pictures." 



8 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Tuesday, July 17, 1934 



No Shortage 
Seen Due to 
Film Drives 



{Continued from page 7) 

"Cock-Eyed Cavaliers," and "His 
Greatest Gamble." "Hat, Coat and 
Glove" and "Down to Their Last 
Yacht" are editing. 

An RKO official believes no diffi- 
culty is in view with the latter two 
under the code, aside from perhaps 
minor changes. "Adventure Girl," a 
Van Beuren feature with Joan Lowell, 
is ready. 

Now shooting and expected for 
August delivery are "The Fountain," 
"The Age of Innocence," and "The 
Gay Divorce," for which a new title is 
sought. These pictures have to pass 
through the code formula before reach- 
ing distribution. 

United Artists 

Al Lichtman says his company is set 
to September with "Bulldog Drum- 
mond Strikes Back," "The Affairs of 
Cellini," "The Last Gentleman," "The 
Count of Monte Cristo," and "Our 
Daily Bread." In additioin, two Eng- 
lish pictures are ready. These are 
"Queen's Affairs," and "Nell Gwyn." 
Neither has been submitted for code 
inspection as yet. 

Universal 

"One More River," "Romance in the 
Rain," and "The Human Side" will 
finish Universal's current schedule, 
aside from "Imitation of Life," which 
is now in work. Practically ready is 
"There's Always Tomorrow," which 
is one of next year's. The first three 
are set for August release. They have 
not been submitted for code inspection 
as yet, so far as New York executives 
knew yesterday. No difficulty, how- 
ever, is expected. 

Warners 

The following pictures are in New- 
York awaiting their release dates, ac- 
cording to a Warner spokesman : 

"Side Streets," "Midnight Alibi," 
"Here Comes the Navy," "Friend of 
Mr. Sweeney," "Man With Two 
Faces," "Housewife." 

In the offing are "Dames," "Dragon 
Murder Case," "British Agent," "Ma- 
dame Du Barry," and "Kansas City 
Princess." 

"There are half a dozen more. We 
are in swell shape," the company 
spokesman declared, but failed to give 
the additional titles or to designate 
whether or not code requirements on 
them have been met. 

John D. Clark, general sales man- 
ager at Fox, could not be reached, 
despite efforts made to do so. Charles 
E. McCarthy, publicity director, like- 
wise could not be reached at his 
office. 

"Vergie" Cleveland 
Hit in Spite of Ban 

Cleveland, July 16. — "The Life of 
Vergie Winters," on the Catholic 
banned list, did better in its second 
week at the RKO Palace than it did 
in its first and was moved into Keith's 
105th St. for a continuation of the 
run. 

"Sadie McKee," also proscribed, 



packed them in in a neighborhood 
house, while "Personality Kid," an 
approved feature, starved. Neither of 
these were in Catholic neighborhoods, 
however. 

"Born to ISe Kissed" 
Gets New Monicker 

"Born to Be Kissed" hits the 
M-G-M schedule Aug. 3, almost two 
months behind its original release 
date, as "The Girl from Missouri." 

Its first delay was occasioned by 
remakes under Production Code Ad- 
ministration. Company officials de- 
clare the picture is innocuous and 
clean and the only thing about it that 
may be construed as torrid is Jean 
Harlow herself. 

Newsreels Guarding 
Against Criticisms 

Kansas City, July 16. — That even 
newsreels are watching their step dur- 
ing the present reform agitation is 
seen in the fact that none of the news- 
reels covered the funeral of John Lazia, 
slain North Side political leader and 
alleged racketeer, who was given the 
largest and most elaborate funeral in 
the history of the city. A representa- 
tive of one of the newsreels explained 
that while, once this would have been 
considered a proper subject, news 
events of this calibre are definitely out. 

"Scarlet Letter" Is 
First to Be Passed 

Hollywood, July 16. — "The Scarlet 
Letter," produced by Majestic, is the 
first independent picture to pass 
the reinforced Production Code Ad- 
ministration. 

The producer is not a Hays asso- 
ciation member. 



Estimate 5,000,000 
Have Signed Pledges 

Detroit, July 16. — In the Michigan 
Catholic, official organ of the Detroit 
diocese, it is stated the Catholic cru- 
sade against indecent films is now on 
in 55 dioceses with a total population 
of 11,000,000 Catholics. 

Just how many have signed the 
pledge is impossible to compute, but 
one bishop expressed the opinion that 
already "5,000,000 Catholics have been 
mustered in." It was stated that 
action in other dioceses is expected 
daily. 

The story went on to say that some 
bishops have written personal letters 
to theatre managers pointing out the 
exact nature of the crusade, stating 
that there is no desire to ruin or inter- 
fere with anyone's legitimate business, 
but emphasizing their determination to 
do everything in their power for the 
protection of their people. 



Producers Worried, 
States Will Rogers 

Boston, July 16.- — Passing through 
here, Will Rogers asserted producers 
were growing fearful of the wide- 
spread agitation against objectionable 
pictures and expressed the opinion that 
"the fuss will do a lot of good." 

Lutherans Join Fight 

Chicago, July 16. — Delegates to the 
convention of Associated Lutheran 
Charities, meeting here at the Mor- 
rison Hotel and representing 3,000 
Lutheran churches, went on record in 
favor of the crusade against films. 



Para. Audit Shows 
$15,500,000 Cash 



(Continued from page 1) 

and a group of general creditors rep- 
resented by Nathan Burkan, attorney, 
and including Erpi, have been author- 
ized to intervene in the Paramount re- 
organization proceedings. Orders were 
signed by Federal Judge Alfred C. 
Coxe over the week-end which permit 
the creditors to intervene upon appli- 
cation under the new bankruptcy laws 
for debtor corporations. Paramount 
Publix bondholders obtained an inter- 
vention order from the Federal court 
earlier and the stockholders' protective 
committee headed by Duncan A. 
Holmes is expected to make a similar 
application as soon as it has received 
deposits of more than 50 per cent of 
the Paramount Publix stock out- 
standing. 

Saenger Files Under 
New Bankruptcy Act 

New Orleans, July 16. — Reorgani- 
zation of the Saenger interests under 
the new bankruptcy law- is sought in 
a petition filed in Federal Court by 
three unsecured creditors, the Blum 
Real Estate Co., Item Publishing Co.. 
and the Baldwin Hardware Co. E. 
Y. Richards, who has been trustee 
under the old bankruptcy law, has 
been named temporary trustee under 
the new act. 

A hearing is scheduled for Aug. 6. 

Frisco Para. Bonds 
Get Federal Permit 

Washington, July 16. — The San 
Francisco Paramount Corp. has been 
granted permission by the Federal 
Trade Commission to issue $1,652,000 
first mortgage bonds which are to be 
issued to the Granada Realty Co.'s 
Bondholders' Protective Committee 
for the transfer of a real estate title. 

This property in San Francisco is 
the site of the Paramount Theatre 
Building. 

The San Francisco Paramount Corp. 
is a successor to the Granada Realty 
Corp. 

Among the officers of the San Fran- 
cisco Paramount Corp. are W. B. Co- 
kell, president ; J. D. Van Wagoner, 
secretary, and M. F. Gowthorpe, treas- 
urer, all of New York. 

Para. Exploitation 
Truck to Make Tour 

Paramount's new lineup will be ex- 
ploited via a traveling sound theatre 
mounted on a truck and equipped with 
projection equipment allowing show- 
ing of trailers day and night. 

Every city and town of 5,000 and 
over along the route will have one or 
more screenings of the trailer, which 
will be renewed from time to time to 
keep pace with the new product re- 
leased. The truck has left Hollywood 
for Seattle where it will start on the 
tour which will include Salt Lake City, 
Denver, Kansas City, Chicago and 
New York. After covering the New- 
England States, the truck goes south 
along the Atlantic seaboard, returning 
to the coast via the southern route. 



Form Foundation Corp. 

Albany, July 16. — The Foundation 
Distributing Corp., New York City, 
has been chartered to distribute films. 
M. E. Curtiss, D. L. Curtiss, and G. 
Herskowitz are directors and sub- 
scribers. 



Strike Closes 
All Houses in 
San Francisco 



(Continued from page 1) 

to reopen the theatres until the situ- 
ation has smoothed itself out. No 
theatre advertising is being carried 
in any of the city's newspapers. The 
houses went dark with the last per- 
formances last night. 

The strike, settlement of which 
hinges on reception by employers of 
the demands being made by the long- 
shoremen's union, has completely 
paralyzed the city. Transportation 
has been crippled and business has 
been severely hit. 

Sixty unions, with a total member- 
ship of some 67,000 workers, are in- 
volved already in the strike, with 
the number of strikers expected to 
exceed 100.000 by tomorrow morn- 
ing. 

Frisco Strike Will 
Not Affect Seattle 

Seattle, July 16. — The general 
strike in San Francisco is not expected 
to have any effect on local theatres. 
The local waterfront strike, now past 
its eighth week, has been responsible 
for a 20 per cent drop in grosses, 
but no further decrease is expected. 
Seattle union sentiment is understood 
to be against a general strike. Busi- 
ness is expected to continue at its 
present level unless other crafts strike 
in sympathy, which is unlikely. 

Portland Now Faces 
Widening of Strike 

Portland, July 16. — Theatres here 
face the prospect of a general strike 
similar to that in progress in San 
Francisco. So far business has been 
affected by the waterfront strike, but 
now the situation takes a new turn. 

Reports are circulating to the effect 
that the general strike here will be 
called in 48 hours and that the unions 
will give 24 hours' notice. 



State Censor Fees 
Go Up to $230,499 

Albany, July 16. — Censorship 
proved a pretty good business for the 
state in its 1933-34 fiscal year when 
fees totaled $230,499 against a budget 
estimate of $225,000. This is an ex- 
cess of $5,499. 



Sign Up Le Per a 

Alfredo Le Pera has been signed 
by Frank Z. Clemente and Lewis 
Maisell to prepare the story, dialogue 
and lyrics for the first of a series of 
six pictures which will 1 e produced in 
the east under the Latin Artists Pic- 
tures Corp. banner. 



Closes Canadian Deal 

Jules Levy, vice-president and gen- 
eral sales manager of RKO Distribut- 
ing Corp., has closed with Famous 
Players Canadian Theatres for the en- 
tire 1934-35 Radio product. The deal, 
Levy says, involves approximately 
125 theatres in all Canadian key spots. 




WHEN 

-that man is 

Warner Baxter 
• 

-that woman is 
Madge Evans... 




A 



YOU JUST KNOW YOUR CROWDS WILL THRILL! 




Compellingly they bring to 
life one of the year's most 
popular novels... the drama 
of strange adventure in 
exotic lands . . . the romance, 
all -possessive but protecting 
. . . the anguish of love. . . and 
its ecstasy! 




— or victim? 

Plunged from the top of 
the medical profession to 
the depths of disgrace. 



BAXTER 

in 

GRAND CANARY 



MADGE EVANS 

Manorie Flambeau • Zita Johann 
Roger Imhof * H. B. Warner 

Directed by Irving Cu minings 

From the novel by A. J. Cronin 
Screen play by 
Ernest Pascal 

A JESSE L. LASKY PRODUCTION 



0} 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Tuesday, July 17, 1934 



British Film 
Edicts Stir 
Varied Views 



By BRUCE ALLAN 

London, July 16 (By Mail).— 
Fundamentally, the issue behind the 
overbuilding dispute, the rentals con- 
troversy, and some other matters, is 
how far it is practicable to govern the 
British industry by edicts issued by 
trade bodies of one sort or another, 
and backed by the "Big Stick" in place 
of leaving free play to economic and 
business forces. 

* * * 

There must, of course, be control 
of these forces, but quite a lot of peo- 
ple here think that there has been a 
tendency recently to attempt to take 
it too far. The British temperament 
is individualistic and fair-minded, and 
doesn't like entrusting the judicial and 
punitive powers, proper to a public 
tribunal, to private bodies which must 
inevitably reflect individual interests. 

In the case of overbuilding, it seems 
impossible to some to envisage a trade 
committee which could be safely en- 
trusted with the right to say no to 
anyone planning a new theatre, much 
less with the power to back its deci- 
sion by the drastic method of with- 
holding product. The first essential of 
such a tribunal is held to be absolute 
impartiality and one has neither reason 
nor right to expect it in a trade body, 
it is argued. 

* * * 

This is apart from the very grave 
doubts some feel as to the ability of 
a trade committee to make its deduc- 
tions good except against the inde- 
pendents. A producer-circuit could 
and would laugh at its threats, it is 
pointed out. If overbuilding is to be 
controlled by ban, it looks as if the 
industry will have to find arbitrators 
and judges outside its own ranks. To 
be wondered, as well, is if the very 
extraordinary powers which it would 
be necessary to give these unofficial 
judges would be accepted for a mo- 
ment by the circuits. 

* * * 

After hesitating- between Lord Nel- 
son and the Duke of Wellington as 
George Arliss's first British film role, 
Gaumont British has selected the sol- 
dier and "The Iron Duke" will go 
on the floor Aug. 20. Victor Savillc 
will direct and the story, by H. M. 
Harwood, is expected to cover the 
"100 days" from Napoleon's escape 
from Elba until Waterloo, and a little 
more, in order to take in the peace 
treaty of Paris. 

Lothar Mendes is directing Conrad 
Veidt, for G-B in both "King of the 
Damned," the Devil's Island stage 
play, and in "Anna Karenina," in 
which Madeleine Carroll will be Anna. 

* * * 

Sub-standard standardization is all 
up in the air again, it seems. The tech- 
nical committee of the British Kine- 
matoeraph Society has asked the Brit- 
ish Film Institute to withdraw its re- 
cent endorsement of the D.I.N. Ger- 
man system (recommended to it, be it 
remembered, by the B.K.S.!) and it 
looks as if the whole matter will be 
reconsidered.^ Protests by firms who 
asserted their systems had not been 



Looking 'Em Over 



"A Man's Game" 

(Columbia) 

This Tim McCoy vehicle represents good wholesome fun for family 
audiences at neighborhood houses. The kids, in particular, will revel 
in it since it has to do with fires and firemen. It is a simple yarn 
speedily and amusingly developed under the direction of D. Ross Leder- 
man. There is plenty of excitement to it. 

Tim and Ward Bond are firemen buddies. They're a sort of Ed- 
mund Lowe- Victor McLaglen combination — two honest-to-goodness 
chums who must have their little bickerings. McCoy joins the fire 
department when his father, a wealthy shoe manufacturer, demands 
that he do something in life besides playing around and getting himself 
into trouble over the traffic laws. 

One day Bond and McCoy join in saving Evalyn Knapp at a fire. 
From that moment the two develop an attachment for the girl. Just 
after McCoy gets her a job in his father's office, she disappears with 
the firm's payroll. Miss Knapp is suspected. In reality she is being 
held prisoner by a couple of criminals working in collusion with the 
firm's cashier. McCoy and Bond, determined Miss Knapp is innocent, 
set about to prove it. They succeed, and the fadeout finds McCoy and 
Miss Knapp altar-bound and the thieves in jail. Running time, 58 
minutes. 



examined before the German standard 
was approved are the motive force 
behind this revision of policy. 

* * * 

Rapid developments in the adver- 
tising and publicity film production 
Fields are producing serious difficulties 
for exhibitors now in many areas. 
Most big commercial films are now 
sold on the value of the advertising 
film, which costs considerably less 
since sub-standard became available, 
and their method of reachingthe pub- 
lic is to stage free shows in which 
entertainment and advertising items 
are blended. 

One and a half-hour programs are 
being staged in certain places and the 
local theatres are feeling it badly. A 
fully effective remedy is not in sight. 
One suggestion is to stop advertising 
films at the source, by trade firms re- 
fusing to produce them, but too many 
conflicting interests are involved to 
make this a likely proceeding. 



Two Fox Units Are 
Chartered in Dover 

Dover, Det... Julv 16. — Fox Alham- 
bra Corp.. Milwaukee Theatres. Inc.. 
Showcraft Prod., Inc., and M. B. 
Service Corp., have been incorporated 
here. 

Fox Alhambra and Milwaukee 
Theatres, listed capital stock of 1,000 
shares, no par value, each. The in- 
corporators for both are David H. 
Tackman, Nutlev. N. J. ; Vincent W. 
Westrup. New York, and Arthur W. 
Britton, West Orange, N. J. 

Showcraft Prod, was chartered to 
handle theatrical and musical produc- 
tions. The incorporators are C. S. 
Peabbles. L. H. Herman and Walter 
Lenz of Wilmington. 

M. B. Service Corp. was chartered 
to create, write, cast and produce 
theatrical film, radio and television 
nrograms. The incorporators are C. 
S. Peabbles, L. FT. Herman and 
Walter Lenz of Wilmington. 



Germany Bans Two 

Berlin, July 16. — Attributing no 
reason, the German government has 
banned "Nana" and "Men in White." 



Expect Loew's Will 
Remain in the Penn 

Pittsburgh, July 16. — Actual man- 
agement of the Penn is expected to 
remain in the hands of Loew's and 
United Artists in spite of the transfer 
of control to preferred stockholders 
here. Leopold Friedman, vice-presi- 
dent of Loew's, has been retained as 
fourth director to represent common 
stockholders. 

Control now rests with the Penn- 
Federal Corp., a holding company, 
and the other three directors are 
Roland McGrady, attorney; Earl A. 
Morton, vice-president of the Com- 
monwealth Trust Co., and Edwin S. 
Fownes, Oakmont. 



"U"-Doane Deal Set 

Hollywood, July 16. — Warren 
Doane will produce four two-reel 
musical "Brevities" for Universal's 
fall release. The shorts will feature 
vaudeville and radio acts. Lyon Cow- 
an will be master of ceremonies in 
the first. 



"Take a Bow" to Stay 

"Baby Take a Bow" will be held 
for a fourth week at the Roxy, be- 
ginning Friday, it was learned yes- 
terday. That the film would go an- 
other stanza was forecast on Friday 
by Motion Picture Daily. 



La. Walkathons Ended 

New Orleans, July 16. — Governor 
Allen has signed a bill prohibiting 
walkathons and other endurance con- 
tests which have been heavy competi- 
tion for theatres. 



"Jane Eyre" Previewed 

"Jane Eyre," starring Virginia 
Bruce and Colin Clive, was shown to 
the trade by Monogram at a special 
preview at the Criterion yesterday 
morning. 



Heading for Europe 

Hollywood, July 16. — Constance 
Bennett is slated to leave July 20 
for a European vacation. She re- 
cently finished in "The Green Hat" 
for M-G-M. 



"Bondage" Is 
Detroit Wow; 
Gets $23,200 



Detroit, July 16. — Brightest spot 
on the first run horizon here was "Of 
Human Bondage," which grabbed a 
sensational $23,200 at the Fox. This 
is §8,200 over normal. 

"Here Comes the Groom" also did a 
fine business, getting $21,300 at the 
Michigan. United Artists went up to 
$7,100 on "Dr. Monica." The weather 
was hot, but business was better gen- 
erally than in the previous week. 

Total first run business was $58,300. 
Average is $55,000. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 12 : 

"THE CIRCUS CLOWN" (Warners) 

FISHER — (2.975). 15c-S0c, 7 days. Gross: 
$6,700. (Average. $10,000) 

"OF HUMAN BONDAGE" (Radio) 

FOX — (5,100), 15c-50c, 7 days. Stage: 
Rosemary Derring heading seven-act bill. 
Gross: $23,200. (Average, $15,000) 
"HERE COMES THE GROOM" (Fara.) 

MICHIGAN — (4,100), 15c-50c. 7 days. 
Stage: Ted Lewis and His Melody Masters. 
Gross: $21,300. (Average, $20,000) 

"DR. MONICA" (Warners) 

LXITED ARTISTS— (2.070). 7 days. 
Gross: $7,100. (Average, $10,000) 



"Bondage" Does $73,000 

"Of Human Bondage" was New 
York's biggest grosser last week. 
The Radio picture and stage show 
drew $73,000 in its second week at 
the Music Hall. 

Some of the other grosses for the 
week were : 

Palace— "Hell Cat" (Col.) and 
vaudeville, $15,000. 

Paramount — "Shoot the Works" 
(Para.) and stage show, $26,800. 

Strand— "Midnight Alibi" (War- 
ners), six days, and "Man with Two 
Faces" (Warners), one day, $9,700. 



Ohio Pulls Nazi Film 

Columbus, July 16.— After viewing 
"Hitler's Reign of Terror," which 
opened at the Allen, Cleveland, Thurs- 
day, the German consulate has made 
official protest to Governor White that 
the picture presents "a distorted 
view" of conditions under Nazi rule. 

Although passed by the censors. 
Governor White has ordered further 
showings stopped and has ordered the 
censors to view the film again. 



On Personal Appearances 

Hollywood, July 16. — Joe Morrison 
leaves for New York the last week 
in July for an extended engagement 
at the Paramount. The actor will 
report back to Paramount here on 
completion of the engagement. 

Mitzi Green checks out for Chicago 
for three weeks of personal appear- 
ances Aug. 12. 



Nolan Quits Hospital 

Hollywood, July 16. — John Nolan, 
Australian representative for Fox, to- 
day left the Cedars of Lebanon Hos- 
pital and will recuperate here. 



Louis Gottschalk Dead 

Hollywood, July 16. — Louis Gott- 
schalk, composer and conductor, 70. 
died today after a paralytic stroke. 
His widow and a daughter survive. 



The Leading 

Daily 

rf4ewspa^eM 
of the 
Motion 
Picture 
Industry 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Alert, 

Intelligent 

and 

Faithful 
Service to 
the Industry 
in All 
Branches 



VOL. 36. NO. 14 



NEW YORK, WEDNESDAY, JULY 18, 1934 



TEN CENTS 



Philadelphia 
Closing Plan 
Is Discarded 



Boycott Protest Out One 
Day Before Time Due 



A plan to shut down theatres whole- 
sale in Philadelphia in protest against 
the blanket Catholic boycott ordered 
there by Cardinal Dougherty has been 
cancelled one day ahead of the orig- 
inal two weeks' notice to theatre em- 
ployes. 

This is a complete and official con- 
firmation of a Philadelphia dispatch 
published in Motion Picture Daily 
on July 11 that the scheme first ad- 
vanced would be quietly dropped. 

Philadelphia. July 17. — The 
about-face in the announced plan to 
close W arner and many of the M. 
P. T. O. member theatres in Phila- 
delphia developed here late last night 
at the testimonial dinner tendered to 
retiring President Lewen Pizor by 
the M. P. T. O. 

Speaking for Warners, Joseph C. 
Bernhard, general manager of that 

(.Continued on page 6) 



Philadelphia Board 
Stops Price Cutting 

Philadelphia, July 17. — Cutting 
prices below contract schedules by the 
Opera House, Columbia, Pa., has been 
ordered stopped by the grievance board. 
The case was brought by the State, 
Columbia. 

A similar ruling has been made 
against the Morris, South Philadel- 
phia. The Grand-Jackson Theatre 
Co. was complainant in this case. 



Zeidman to Make 4 
More as 'U' Producer 

Hollywood, July 17. — With two 
more pictures yet to complete as an 
independent producer for Universal, B. 
F. Zeidman has been signed to a new 
contract for four more to be turned 
out as a producer for the company, 
without outside capital. 



M-G-M Loses Appeal 
In "Rasputin" Suit 

London, July 17. — M-G-M today 
lost its appeal in the libel suit of 
Princess Irena Youssoupoff, who was 
awarded $125,000 by a lower court on 
on the charge that the character of 
Natasha in "Rasputin and the Em- 
press" was a reflection upon her. 



Loew Gets 'U,' Columbia 
List; RKO Rift Widens 



Loew's and Warners to Make 

Alternate Bids for Fox Met 

Loew's and Warners are preparing two alternate bids for the 
Fox Metropolitan circuit, one of which will offer $4,500,000 for the 
leasehold assets and the other, $4,000,000 for the bonds deposited 
with the bondholders' committee, it was learned yesterday. 

Details of both bids are still in process of negotiation, it was 
reported, and no estimate of the time it would take to complete 
them could be made yesterday. The alternate bid for the bonds, 
rather than the leaseholds, is being made at the direction of Fed- 
eral Judge Julian W. Mack, who is slated to hear the new offers 
on Friday. Spokesmen for the bidders were unable to say yes- 
terday whether an agreement could be reached with the bondhold- 
ers by that time. 



Percentages, 
Unclean Films 
Hit By KMTA 



Kansas City, Mo., July 17. — Per- 
centage sales were condemned today 
in a resolution at the 16th annual 
convention of the Kansas-Missouri 
Theatre Ass'n. The resolution, in- 
troduced by Tom Edwards of Eldon, 
Mo., was adopted on the ground dis- 
tributors demand preferred datings 
for percentage pictures with resultant 
loss to exhibitors. 

Clean films were a topic of dis- 
cussion, the majority opinion being 
favorable to the campaign to purge 
the screen. It was revealed that 
many members of the association are 
cooperating with the churches. 

Tohn C. Stapel, K. M. T. A. vice- 
president, was named to the presi- 
dency. C. L. McVey was elected 

(Continued on page 8) 



Film Pledges 
To Be Sought 
In Homes Here 



Methods of distributing the Legion 
of Decency pledges were discussed at 
a meeting of the inter-faith- commit- 
tee at the rectory of Holy Cross 
Church yesterday afternoon when it 
was decided to divide the city into 
districts, each under a sub-committee, 
and to make a house-to-house cam- 
paign for signatures. 

The main purpose of this action, 
said Rev. Joseph A. McCaffrey, 
spokesman for the committee, is to 
enable non-churchgoers as well as 
churchgoers to join the campaign. The 
drive will be started within the next 
two weeks. 

"We are anxious to have the motion 
picture industry understand immedi- 
ately that this campaign is a serious, 

(Continued on page 6) 



Colored Theatres Given 
White Clearance Rating 



Theatres catering to colored patron- 
age are given the same rating on 
clearance as theatres patronized by 
whites, as a result of a decison handed 
down by Campi sustaining a Washing- 
ton, D. C, clearance and zoning board 
ruling granting Loew's white pa- 



tronage houses 21 days' protection 
over Lichtman Theatres black patron- 
age houses. 

Lichtman's houses formerly did not 
follow the Loew houses in accordance 
with custom prevailing generally 

(Continued on page 8) 



Tussle Between Major 
N. Y. Circuits for 
Top Spot Grows 



The Loew circuit will play Univer- 
sal and Columbia in the metropolitan 
area next season, giving it six major 
programs, in toto and in part, to draw 
on and further indicating a widened 
rift in relations with RKO, its most 
important circuit competitor. 

Exactly to what extremes these buys 
will change the complexion of the lo- 
cal situation is perhaps too early to 
figure, but the general impression has 
it this additional strengthening of the 
Loew picture situation may prove to 
be the last straw in an open tussle 
with RKO for supremacy in the rich- 
est territory in the United States. 

Sold to Loew for the first time in 
its history and away from RKO 
which for some years has been pur- 
chasing the product for its city cir- 
cuit, the Universal lineup will now go 
four ways. Loew has purchased 18 
Universals for its more important 
houses. In addition there is a criss- 

(Coutinued on page 8) 



Holmden in Charge 
Of 306 for IATSE 

Harland Holmden, president of the 
Cleveland M. P. Operators' Union, 
assumed charge of Local 306 yester- 
day in response to a request of George 
Browne, I. A. T. S. E. president. 

Holmden is expected to continue 
in charge of Local 306 until its af- 
fairs have been straightened out suf- 
ficiently to permit an election of new 
officers by members. 

Reports were current yesterday that 
a new effort was under way to con- 
solidate Local 306 with Allied M. 
P. Operators' Union. While the 
prospect of such a consolidation was 
regarded as probable by persons close- 
ly associated with both organizations, 
no official verification of the report 
could be obtained. 



New Saenger Moves 
Include No Claims 

New Orleans, July 17. — No new 
claims have been filed in Federal Court 
as a result of the bankruptcy petition 
filed under the new law. It is under- 
stood that action authorizing the filing 
of the petition and allowing a claim 
of the A. Baldwin Co., hardware 
dealers, was taken by a bondholders' 
committee meeting July 12. 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Wednesday, July 18. 1934 



Insiders' Outlook 



< Purely 
Personal ► 



2 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



(Registered U. S. Patent Offiee) 



Vol. 36 July 18, 1934 No. 14 



Martin Quigley 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 



MAURICE KANN 

Editor 
JAMES A. CRON 
Advertising Manager 




Published daily except Sunday and holi- 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub- 
sidiary of Quigley Publications, Inc., 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 1790 Broadway, New 
York. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Cable ad 
dress "Quigpubco, New York." All con- 
tents copyrighted 1934 by Motion Picture 
Daily, Inc. Address all correspondence tc 
the New York Office. Other Quigley pub 
lications: MOTION PICTURE HERALD, 
BETTER THEATRES, THE MOTION 
PICTURE ALMANAC and THE CH: 
CAGOAN. 

Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Life 
Building, Vine and Yucca Streets, Victor 
M. Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 407 
South Dearborn Street, Edwin S. Clif- 
ford, manager; London Bureau: Remo 
House, 310 Regent St., London, W. 1, 
Bruce Allan, Representative. Cable address: 
"Quigpubco, London"; Berlin Bureau: 
Berlin - Tempelhof , Kaiserin - Augustastrasse 
28, Joachim K. Rutenberg, Representative; 
Paris Bureau: 19, Rue de la Cour des 
Noues, Pierre Autre, Representative; Rome 
Bureau: Viale Gorizia, Vittorio Malpassuti. 
Representative; Sydney Bureau: 102 Sus 
sex Street, Cliff Holt, Representative; Mex 
ico City Bureau: Apartado 269, Jame* 
Lochhart, Representative; Glasgow Bureau: 
86 Dundrennan Road, G. Holmes. Repre 
tentative, Budapest Bureau: 3. Kaplar-u. 
Budapest, II, Endre Hevesi, Representa 
tive. 

Entered as second class matter January 
4, 1926 at the Post Office at New York 
City, N. Y., under Act of March 3, 1379. 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada $15 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 



George Weeks Here 

George W. Weeks is in New York 
for a series of conferences with Ar- 
thur A. Lee, in connection with the 
west coast distribution of Gaumont 
British and Gainsborough pictures. 

Lee has added Rudolph Bach to the 
sales department to work out of the 
New York Office and in the metro- 
politan area. 



Fuller Now in London 

London, July 17. — Sir Benjamin 
Fuller, director of Fuller's, Ltd., Aus- 
tralian theatre circuit, has arrived here 
to try to secure auxiliary finance for 
the floatation of an Australian produc- 
tion company, to obtain product for 
his houses and to contact English 
production heads. 



First U. A. Releases Set 

United Artists has set dates on its 
first two releases of the new season. 
"Bulldog Drummond Strikes Back" 
will be released on July 20, while "The 
Affairs of Cellini" is scheduled for 
Aug. 3. 



"Rothschild" on Today 

"The House of Rothschild" starts 
its first local popular price run to- 
day with the reopening of the Rivoli, 
which has been dark for the past four 
weeks. 



Votes for Sunday Shows 

Wellington, Kan., July 17. — Sun- 
day shows won a victory at a special 
election here yesterday by a vote of 
1.739 to 763. 



\XT HEN two giants begin to 
T» throw mountains at each 
other, the consequences are apt 
to be what you find bubbling and 
boiling over in little old New 
York as this was written last 
night. There are wheels within 
wheels in all of this and some 
of them might be confusing and 
contradictory if you don't watch 
out or if you don't know what 
the lowdown happens to be. 
About the time, Nick Schenck 
and Harry Warner surprised all 
and sundry by joining up in a 
combination bid for those Fox 
Met. houses, RKO, having some- 
thing like $39,000,000 invested in 
New York theatre properties, be- 
gan to look around and see 
what it could see. . . . 

T 

For instance, it saw, or thought 
it saw, troublesome waters ahead 
if that bid were accepted. It en- 
visioned then, as it no doubt 
does now, that its theatre posi- 
tion might be threatened if Loew 
added a chunk of perhaps as 
many as 50 houses in Greater 
New York. It came to the con- 
clusion its investment needed 
safeguards and that explains how 
and why some deals were started 
on the q. t. for additional houses 
in this territory. They had to be 
in zones where Loew would be- 
come the big cheese if the Fox 
Met. dicker became a deal ; they 
had to be convertible into first 
runs which was viewed as sim- 
ple because RKO had no houses 
of its own in those areas any- 
way. So the circuit began to 
swing out for more houses. . . . 
T 

The scene now shifts to Broad- 
way and 45th St. Loew, discov- 
ering what was going on quickly 
enough because there are ways 
of doing that, became annoyed at 
RKO's plans. Moreover, it 
didn't hesitate to say so. "Two 
can play that game," was the 
reaction and immediately there 



was set afoot a plan to step into 
sacred RKO domain. At the same 
time and, by way of prepara- 
tion for the possible annexation 
of those Fox Met. properties, 
Dave Loew began to dig around 
for more product. Already cor- 
ralled was all Metro, United 
Artists, half of Paramount and 
Warner. Captured from the RKO 
ranks where they had been regi- 
mented for several seasons, come 
Universal and Columbia. Beyond 
question, Loew thereby steps into 
Number 1 spot in point of pic- 
ture availabilities. . . . 

▼ 

RKO maintains its poise and 
insists (1) the battle isn't over 
and (2) there is nothing to worry 
about. While the entente cor- 
diale which has prevailed from 
time to time between these two 
major metropolitan circuits has 
been strained on occasion and 
again is. the understanding has 
prevailed more often than other- 
wise that each was to leave the 
other fellow's backyard alone. 
The battle standards now flying 
bravely in the breeze, on the 
other hand, may yet be pulled 
down. There was the time, only 
a season back, when RKO was in 
the position Loew is now in. . . . 
T 

Schenck needed pictures and 
told Harold B. Franklin so at the 
time. He got the product and, 
therefore, a favor at the same 
time. What happened once may 
happen again. Even giants have 
found it good business to be co- 
operative. Aside from that, next 
season may find RKO sitting 
where Loew is today. Poten- 
tially in the sweetest spot of all 
is Johnny Clark with Fox. the 
only unsold major line of product. 
If the franchise which Skouras 
and Randforce insist is theirs is 
found not to be theirs, a deal 
with RKO will be possible. Clark 
then will collect plenty and right 
down the line. ... KANN 



RC. SHERRIFF leaves England 
• for the United States aboard the 
Majestic today on his way to Holly- 
wood where he will work on the 
scripts of the two Dickens tales 
planned for production by Universal, 
"Great Expectations" and "The 
Mystery of Edwin Drood." 

Harry D. Goldberg is back from 
Buffalo, where business having to do 
with "The World in Revolt" kept him 
busy for about 10 days. 

Sam Jaffe departed for the coast 
yesterday to appear in Samuel Gold- 
wyn's production of "We Live Again." 

Gustav Brock, hand-coloring ex- 
pert, did special work for "Here 
Comes the Navy." 

Glenn Griswold has left the Doc- 
tors' Hospital. 

David Bernstein is in Maine vaca- 
tioning. 

E. M. Fay of Providence is in town. 



"U" Importing 3 Britons 

Three British players are being im- 
ported by Universal under long-term 
contracts. They are Carol Coombe. 
Francis L. Sullivan and Valerie Hob- 
son. Miss Coombe is already on her 
way. She will reach New York 
aboard the Britannic on Saturday 
and leave Monday for the coast. The 
other two sail for the States aboard 
the Rerengaria July 21. 



Cohn, Spingold Back 

Jack Cohn and Xate Spingold re- 
turned to their offices at Columbia yes- 
terday after their trip to the coast 
following the western sales meet in 
Chicago. 

Hollywood. July 17. — Harry Cohn 
is expected to leave by plane for New 
York the end of this week. 



Mayer Coming by Plane 

Holly'wood. July 17. — Louis B. 
Mayer, Frank Orsatti and Howard 
Strickling fly to New York tomor- 
row. On Friday they will sail for 
London. From there they will go 
to Vichy, France, where Mayer will 
take the cure. 



Lou Brown a Dad 

Washington, July 17. — Mrs. Shir- 
ley Brown has presented Lou Brown, 
local publicity chief for Loew's. with 
a five-pound baby girl. Both Mrs. 
Brown and child are doing splendidly 
at the Sibley Hospital. 



Shirley's Pay Not Set 

Hollywood. July 17. — Parents of 
Shirley Temple and Fox executives 
are still in a huddle over the former's 
demand for $2,500 per week as against 
the $1,000 offered by the company. 



Big Musical Planned 

Hollywood, July 17. — Warners are 
planning a super musical for fall pro- 
duction featuring Al Jolson, Dick 
Powell and Rudy Vallee. 



Paramount Sets Preview 

"She Loves Me Not," one of Para- 
mount's new season attractions, will 
be previewed at the Criterion at 11 
o'clock this morning. 



Loew Pfd. Off Y 2 on Big Board 

Net 

High Low Close Change 

Consolidated Film Industries 3 3 3 

Consolidated Film Industries, pfd 1234 12'/ 2 1254 — 54 

Eastman Kodak 98 98 98 -I- 

Fox Film "A" 1V% 1VA 1154 — H 

Loew's. Inc TiVi 26'/ 2 26% + % 

Loew's. Inc.. pfd 9014 9054 9054 — 54 

Paramount Publix 354 3% 3% 

Pathe Exchange \% 1% \% — Vi 

Pathe Exchange "A" 18% 1854 18% — % 

RKO 2'A 2 2% + 5$ 

Warner Bros 4% PA 454 — Vi 

Trans Lux Off Vs on Curb 

Net 

High Low Close Change 

Technicolor 13% 1354 1356 — % 

Trans Lux 1% 1% 1% — 'A 

Bond Market Off Slightly 

Net 

H^Th Low Close Change 

General Theatre Equipment 6s '40 7 534 5% — \ l A 

L-ew's 6s '41. ww deb rights 10014 10"54 10054 — 54 

Paramount Broadway 5 T /, S '51 40 40 40 — 54 

Paramount F. L. 6s '47..... <*6 46 46 — 54 

Paramount Publix 554s '50 4754 47'/ 4754 + 54 

Warner Bros. 6s '39, wd 5354 5354 5354 — % 



Sales 

100 
100 
100 
100 

2.100 
100 

1.100 
400 
600 

3.600 

5.100 



Sales 

700 
400 



Sales 

9 



BRIGHTEST 

PAGE 



in motion picture history! 





One 




CARL 

LAEMMLE 

presents— 



II 



A Great Novel 
Becomes an Even 
Greater Picture! 



With This Splendid 
Box -Office Cast: 

FRANK LAWTON — JANE WYATT— MRS. PATRICK 
CAMPBELL-COLIN CLIVE-LIONEL ATWILL — 
REGINALD DENNY-C. AUBREY SMITH— HENRY 
STEPHENSON -KATHLEEN HOWARD-ALAN 
MOWBRAY. Screenplay by R. C. SHERRIFF. 

A JAMES WHALE PRODUCTION 

UNIVERSAL 





MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Wednesday, July 18, 1934 



Film Pledges 
To Be Sought 
In Homes Here 



(Continued from page 1) 
sustained and determined effort to 
purge the industry of all indecency, 
portrayals of crime and lewdness," 
Father McCaffrey continued. 

It was further agreed that all civic 
societies, clubs and associations should 
be supplied with pledges, and that all 
members of these organizations be re- 
quested to sign them and to support 
the campaign. It was revealed that 
many requests for pledges have al- 
ready been received by the committee, 
and these will be sent out shortly. 

With the opening of schools in Sep- 
tember a drive will also be started to 
enroll every child attending school in 
Greater New York. This will include 
colleges, high schools, grade schools 
and Sunday schools. 

Since the first meeting there has ap- 
parently been a change of plans, for 
it was then announced that the next 
step would be a conference with the 
producers. When asked about this 
yesterday, Father McCaffrey said that 
such an invitation would have to come 
from some national organization since 
his committee would confine itself to 
local affairs. 

Criticizes Cancellation Plan 

The committee also went on record 
as being dissatisfied with the recent 
arrangement of the Hays office where- 
by exhibitors could cancel pictures 
made up to July IS on moral grounds. 
It was felt that this was a step in the 
right direction, but that it did not go 
far ^enough and that some preparation 
should be made for the cancellation of 
p r oduct after that date. 

In the matter of future supervision 
the committee will be guided by the 
national Protestant, Catholic and Jew- 
ish organizations, since it is only a 
local unit. 

The meeting was presided over by 
Father McCaffrey. The other mem- 
bers who attended were : Rev. J. 
Henry Carpenter, secretary of the 
Brooklyn Church and Mission Feder- 
ation ; Rabbi Sidney E. Goldstein, as- 
sociate rabbi of the Free Synagogue: 
Rabbi William F. Rosenblum, Temple 
Israel, and Rev. Frederick B. Newell 
and Rev. Walter M. Howlett of the 
Greater New York Federation of 
Churches. 



Philadelphia, July 17. — Endorse 
ments of the clean film drive have 
been made by many Protestant pastors 
according to Rev. Dr. Percy Stock- 
man, chairman of a committee of the 
Philadelphia Federation of Churches 
which last week called for support 
from all Protestants. 

Englewood, N. J., July 17. — Post- 
ing of a weekly "white" list of films 
will be started Sunday by Rev. Al- 
bert H. Dolan of St. Cecilia's Catho- 
lic Church. To date 2,000 have signed 
the Legion of Decency pledge. Ex- 
hibitors blame block booking for their 
troubles in conferences with him, says 
Father Dolan. 



Looking 'Em Over 



"Cuesta Aba jo" ("Downward") 

{Paramount) 

This is the first of a series of Spanish films being produced at East- 
ern Service Studios by Paramount starring Carlos Gardel. The Argen- 
tine star is little known in this country, but previously has produced 
two for Paramount in Paris. He is said to be the idol of Spanis"h- 
speaking countries. 

Gardel sings several numbers. His voice is remarkable. It has warmth 
and power and he sings with graceful ease. George Webber has done 
an unusual job of photography and Louis Gasnier's direction is neat. 
Mona Maris is made to appear extremely beautiful. 

Even non-Spanish speaking audiences who enjoy good singing and an 
engaging personality can find pleasure in this feature. 

"I Give My Love," Monday night's premiere at the May fair, was reviewed 
by wire from Hollywood on May 22. 

"His Greatest Gamble," last flight's premiere at the Rialto, was reviewed 
by wire from Hollywood on June 18. 

"Grand Canary," tomorrow's opener at the Radio City Music Hall, was re- 
viewed by zvire from Hollywood on June 15. 



are among the aims of the Portland 
M. P. Council, which has just com- 
pleted its organization. Mrs. S. E. 
Skelly, American Ass'n. of Univer- 
sity Women, is chairman, and Mrs. 
Hugh Smith, Parent-Teachers' Ass'n., 
is secretary. 



Omaha, July 17. — No resolution 
favoring the present drive on objec- 
tionable films was voted at the con- 
vention here of the Walther League, 
which decided to continue its stand 
taken last year against indecent pic- 
tures rather than align itself with any 
other church organization in the cur- 
rent campaign. The league, however, 
has promised its cooperation to the 
Protestant campaign. 

The league plans to form a better 
films committee here in September. 
Its basis will be a similar committee 
formed in Omaha three years ago. All 
church groups, parent-teacher associa- 
tions and women's clubs have been in- 
vited to appoint representatives. A 
local committee will keep in touch 
with developments on the coast. 



Breen O. K.'s 14 Features 

Hollywood, July 17. — Fourteen fea- 
tures and 12 shorts were certified to- 
day by Joseph I. Breen. Features ap- 
proved were : 

"The Catspaw"( Harold Lloyd) ; "House- 
wife," "Friends of Mr. Sweeney," ''Circus 
Clown," "Madame Du Barry," "Here Comes 
the Navy," "Kansas City Princess," "Re- 
turn of the Terror." "Midnight Alibi" 
(Warners) ; "Cleopatra" (Paramount); "Our 
Daily Bread" (U. A.); "One Night of 
T o-e." "Blind Date" (Columbia). 



Portland, July 17. — Improvement 
in the moral tone of films and the 
eventual inclusion of a course in pic- 
ture appreciation in high schools here 



Ad Men Meet Milliken 

Advertising and publicity heads of 
M. P. P. D. A. member companies 
met yesterday with Carl E. Milliken 
and J. J. McCarthy at the Harvard 
Club to discuss film and theatre ad- 
vertising policy. The meeting was 
described as "routine" by both Milli- 
ken and McCarthy. 



Allied Meets at Shore 

Asbury Park, July 17. — The reg- 
ular meeting of Allied of New Jersey 
was held at the Berkeley-Carteret 
here today with Sidney Samuelson 
presiding. 



"One Night of Love" 
Impresses Londoners 

By BRUCE ALLAN 

London, July 17. — "One Night of 
Love" created an enormous impression 
at its opening in the Prince Edward 
Theatre tonight. Officials of all the 
important companies were present. 

Grace Moore's singing was regard- 
ed as a new high in recording. 



Dine Spanish Writers 

Paramount was host yesterday at 
Sardi's to a group of about 40 Span- 
ish-speaking correspondents, some of 
whom are connected with New York 
publications, but most of them with 
Central and South American papers. 
Eugene Zukor was present. 

Following the luncheon "Cuesta 
Abajo" was shown in the Paramount 
building. This is the first of a series 
in Spanish starring Carlos Gardel, 
Argentinian actor and singer. 



A.T.&T. Earns $61,999,195 

A. T. & T., which controls Western 
Electric, earned $61,999,195 in the first 
half of the year. This does not reflect 
the current deficit of Western Elec- 
tric. This figure represents $3.32 a 
share for the first six months and 
compares with $2.40 per share for the 
same period last year. 



Nolan Wants to Quit 

Hollywood, July 17. — John Nolan, 
who is now recuperating after several 
weeks at the Cedars of Lebanon Hos- 
pital, has asked that he be relieved 
from his Australian post by Fox. He 
plans to rejoin the New York sales 
force when he has recovered. 



Philadelphia 
Closing Plan 
Is Discarded 



Hawks on "Sutter" 

Hollywood, July 17. — Howard 
Hawks has been signed by Universal 
to direct "Sutter's Gold," thereby 
clinching the company's intention of 
making it for the 1934-35 program. 

Edward G. Robinson and Richard 
Dix have been considered for the lead. 



Sloane Beats Schedule 

Hollywood, July 17. — Paul Sloane, 
directing "Four Walls" for M-G-M, 
brought the production into the cut- 
ting rooms in 18 davs. 



(Continued from page 1) 

circuit's theatres, explained the switch 
in decision had been made in view of 
numerous petitions from clubs, Cham- 
bers of Commerce, business men and 
hardships which thus would be passed 
on to employes. 

"We believe that the greatest good 
for the greatest number should be 
served and, while it may be to our 
financial loss to continue operating our 
theatres under these conditions, we, 
nevertheless, at this time have decided 
to heed requests and will continue op- 
erating our theatres with a hope of an 
early modification of this unfair boy- 
cott," he said. 

Charles Segall, incoming M. P. 
T. O. president, said: 

"I want to go on record that I 
shall continue to fight against closing 
of theatres." He thereby indicated the 
sentiment of independents was with 
Warners. 

Nizer Acts as M. C. 

Louis Nizer, secretary of the New- 
York Film Board of Trade, acted as 
master of ceremonies. Judge Kep- 
hart of the Supreme Court reminded 
the film men of their responsibility to 
the public, but said : 

"The boycott against all moving 
picture production is not entirely fair. 
The 80 per cent should not be penal- 
ized because 20 per cent is bad." 

Ed Kuykendall paid tribute to Pizor 
and condemned members of the indus- 
try "who take advantage of a situa- 
tion and rush into statements deroga- 
tory to motion pictures for personal 
aggrandizement." 

He hit salacious advertising as do- 
ing more damage than any other fac- 
tor and hit the tendency of exhibitors 
to use block booking as an excuse for 
the present situation. 

One hundred and fifty attended. 
Pizor was presented a watch from 
the M. P. T. O. and a bag from dis- 
tributors. A gift is to come from 
members of Local 307, I. A. T. S. E. 



Radio to Do Feature 
In New Technicolor 

Radio has completed a deal with 
Pioneer Pictures, headed by John Hay 
Whitney, to produce a feature, "The 
Three Musketeers," in the new Tech- 
nicolor process. This is the process 
used in the short, "La Cucaracha," 
which is to be released soon. 

The feature will go into work about 
Oct. 1 and will be ready for release, it 
is expected, about Jan. 1. The deal 
was closed by Whitney with J. R. 
McDonough and B. B. Kahane, who 
acted for Radio. Kenneth Mac- 
Gowan, who directed "La Cucaracha," 
and Robert Edmond Jones, who de- 
signed the sets, will act in the same 
posts on the new feature. 



Technicolor in Paris 

Hollywood, July 17. — Natalie Kal 
mus leaves Wednesday for Paris 
where she proposes establishing office 
for Technicolor and collaborating witl 
several French producers on the color 
process. 



rO THE PRAISES OF THE CRITICS . . . 
IDD THE PLAUDITS OF THE CROWDS! 



r hile critics honor this mighty entertainment as "a notable 
Idition to cinema's best". . . #2 Criterion audiences . . . caught 
its emotional tide . . . are swept to laughter, tears, sustained 
tplause. Audience reaction . . . true guide to box office power 
. marks "The World Moves On" as a picture truly great! 





MADELEINE CARROLL 
FRANCHOT TONE 

Produced by Winfield Sheehan 

Directed by John Ford 
Story and screen play by Reginald Berkeley 



^ 9 ICTUM 



8 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Wednesday, July 18, 1934 



Colored Theatres Given 
White Clearance Rating 



Percentages, 
Unclean Films 
Hit By KMTA 



Loew Gets 6 U,' 
And Col; RKO 
Rift Widens 

{Continued from page 1) 

cross split, varying in competitive 
zones but under which part of the "U" 
lineup will go to Skouras Theatres, 
Randforce and the Century circuit. 
Loew also has annexed the right to 
play the rest of the Universal lineup 
in its other theatres, but not in neigh- 
borhood first runs. 

Columbia's deal also marks a sale 
away from RKO. It is understood to 
have been precipitated by the charge 
RKO failed to live up to its commit- 
ment to play 11 Columbias the big 
half of the week during the season 
about to close. Loew is reported to 
have purchased 17 of Columbia's new 
list with a call on the remainder for 
other of its theatres. 

This gives the Loew circuit as? 
availabilities 50 from M-G-M ; 30, or 
half, from Paramount ; 30, or half 
from Warners ; 18 from Universal. 17 
from Columbia and 10 from United 
Artists, the latter holding a long-time 
franchise with the circuit renewable 
each season subject to agreed upon 
terms. The understanding is the U.A. 
picture overage may be picked up by 
Loew at its discretion and again sub- 
ject to terms. 

As against this, RKO has available 
50 from Radio Pictures ; 30, or the 
second half, of Warners ; and 30, or 
the second half, of Paramount. In the 
balance is the Fox list, but whether 
or not a deal with RKO is possible 
appears undetermined at the minute. 

Franchise Is Involved 

Involved here is an extended fran- 
chise originally made with Skouras 
Theatres and Randforce and turned 
over to the RKO circuit when the lat- 
ter made its booking deal with the for- 
mer two chains. RKO, however, can- 
celed out some months ago, thereby 
presumably returning the franchise to 
Skouras and Randforce. Fox lawyers 
are now studying the company's rights 
in the matter and expect to arrive at 
a decision in the next couple of days. 
Those claiming to speak authoritative- 
ly for both Skouras and Randforce 
yesterday asserted the Fox franchise 
had reverted to them. 

The significance of this rests in the 
fact that, if Skouras and Randforce 
pick up the Fox product, no sale to 
the RKO circuit will be possible, 
thereby confronting those theatres with 
a product shortage which disinterested 
bystanders declare will prove to be 
extremely serious. The only other re- 
maining product which then would be- 
come available on this basis would be 
independent attractions. 

The strained relations between RKO 
and Loew are understood to be trace- 
able to plans made by the former to 
take over additional houses in zones 
which would become Loew-dominant 
in the event the Loew- Warner bid for 
Fox Met is finally accepted. RKO 
officials, voicing opinions privately, re- 
gard their acquisitions, actual and po- 
tential, as necessary to protect their 
own circuit's position in the metropol- 
itan area. Loew, on the other hand, 
is known to feel RKO has stepped into 



situations competitive with its existing 
theatres. 

In the meantime, the surprise film 
buys on the part of Loew is met with 
calm and assurance at RKO where 
the attitude is reflected by this com- 
ment : 

"The show isn't over yet. Just wait 
and see." 

Petersburg to Get 
Film with Richmond 

Washington, July 17. — Three cases 
have just been decided by the clearance 
and zoning board. 

The board ruled that Richmond's 14, 
days over Petersburg were unreason- 
able, and decided that Richmond first 
runs should have no clearance at all 
over Petersburg. The case was 
brought by the Blue Bird against 
Loew's and Wilmer & Vincent. 

Clearance of 14 days afforded the 
Palace and Ritz, Baltimore, operated 
by Louis Gaertner, over John H. 
Whittle's Avenue was determined to 
be fair. The Avenue was also deter- 
mined to be in the same zone with the 
Belnord, Red Wing and State, oper- 
ated by the Durkee interests. The Bel- 
nord and State are entitled to 14 days 
over the Avenue, it was decided, and 
the Red Wing will have prior run 
only and no clearance over the Avenue. 

Wood Will Send Out 
Ohio Release Lists 

Columbus, O., July 17. — In order 
that exhibitors may take advantage of 
the 10 per cent cancellation clause 
within the 14-day limit after national 
release date, as specified in the code, 
and to obviate the necessity of con- 
ferring with the exchanges to secure 
information on releases, P. J. Wood, 
business manager of the I. T. O., 
hereafter will issue a bulletin to all 
exhibitor-members. These will reach 
the addressees on Monday of each 
week, and will contain a list of pic- 
tures to be released during the current 
seven days. 

Lists of releases will be certified to 
Wood by the code secretaries at Cleve- 
land and Columbus. 

Denver Code Ukase 
Received by Campi 

The manifesto signed by 36 of 40 
exhibitors in the Denver metropoli- 
tan area declining recognition of Code 
Authority and local code boards un- 
til "home rule" in exhibition affairs 
is granted was received at Campi 
headquarters yesterday. 

"A reply to the manifesto will be 
made within a few days," John C. 
Flinn, executive secretary of Campi, 
said, "and will be made public at 
that time." 



Protest French Ban 

Paris, July 17. — Protesting vigor- 
ously against taxation designed to ex- 
clude American made films from 
France, the French Cinema Owners' 
Ass'n. has asked the minister of com- 
merce to permit more American films 
to enter this country instead of fur- 
ther limiting the quota as demanded 
by French producers. 



{Continued from page 1) 

throughout the southern states. This 
precedent for granting protection to 
a "white" house over a "black" house 
may result in widespread changes in 
release schedules in the south. The 
decision was one of 20 handed down 
yesterday by Campi on appeals 
brought to it since June 28. Other 
decisions- are : 

Kansas City — Nu-Era vs. Summit. Griev- 
ance board ruling dismissing an overbuying 
complaint against the Summit is affirmed. 

Indianapolis — Dream vs. Paramount. 
Grievance board ruling dismissing a com- 
plaint of reduced admissions by the Para- 
mount is affirmed. 

Baltimore — Brooklyn vs. McHenry's and 
Pacy's Garden. Clearance and zoning 
board's decision affirmed. De Luxe vs. 
McHenry's, Pacy's Garden and Brodie. 
Clearance and zoning board's decision modi- 
ried limiting the protection of the respond- 
ents to 10 days over the De Luxe begin- 
ning with the new season. 

Buffalo — New Ariel vs. Majestic. Griev- 
ance board rulings finding the Majestic 
guilty of reducing admissions and continuing 
the practice after a cease and desist order 
was served are affirmed. The board's order 
to distributors not to furnish the Majestic 
with film after June 25 is approved and a 
similar order is issued to distributors by 
Campi to take effect July 25 unless the 
Majestic files a certificate of compliance 
satisfactory to the grievance board prior 
to that date. 

Victoria, Texas — Rubin F'rels vs. Jeffer- 
son Amusement Co. Grievance board find 
ing that Jefferson was overbuying and mak- 
ing too frequent changes of program is 
affirmed. The board's ruling that Frels 
is to have one-half of the product signed 
for by Jefferson with the exception of Para- 
mount pictures so long as both shall con- 
tinue in business is modified to be effective 
for one year only. 

Schine Found Overbuying 

Lockport, N. V. — Reliance Theatres vs. 
Schine Theatrical Co. Grievance Luard 
finding that Schine was overbuying and 
should release 17 features to Reliance af- 
firmed with modifications which still re- 
quire Schine to release 17 to Reliance. 

Middletown, Conn. — Middletown Enter- 
prises vs. Poli Circuit, Hartford. Clearance 
and zoning board ruling eliminating seven- 
day protection of Hartford over Middletown 
and Meriden is affirmed. 

Lowville, N. Y. — Ernest J. Wolfe (Ava- 
lon) vs. Schine Theatrical Corp., Water- 
town, N. Y. Clearance and zoning board's 
decision modified to give Schine's Avon 
seven days' protection over the Avalon until 
such time as less protection is given the 
Avon over any other house approximately 
the same distance from it as the Avalon. 

Littleton, Col. — Fred Lind (Grand) vs. 
Gothic, Englewood, Col. Grievance board 
finding that the Gothic had reduced admis- 
sions and its order to cease and desist is 
affirmed. 

Camden, N. J. — Camden Drive-In The- 
atre vs. RKO. Dismissal of the Camden's 
complaint of nonfulfillment of contract by 
RKO affirmed on the grounds that the com- 
plainant has other recourses at law. 

Alton, 111. — Protest by S. E. Pirtle. Jer- 
seyville, 111., to St. Louis clearance and 
zoning board over protection granted to Al- 
ton. Board's ruling affirmed with the modi- 
fication that if any less protection is ever 
granted Alton over theatres equally distant 
as Jerseyville is from Alton, then the same 
reduction shall be made for Jerseyville. 

Hudson, N. Y. — S. Hochstim (Star) vs. 
Hen-Wil-Hen Corp. (Park, Playhouse, Rial- 
to). Dismissal of overbuying charge for 
new season is affirmed on grounds that com- 
plaint is premature but without prejudice to 
complainant to reinstate case if justified 
later. 

Sussex, N. J. — Sussex Amusement Co. vs. 
Strand and Ritz, Port Jervis. N. Y. Port 
Jervis clearance over Sussex limited to 14 
days. 

Macomb, 111. — M. Ewing. LaHarpe, 111., 
vs. Andrew Hainline, Macomb. Chicago 
clearance and zoning board's ruling reduc- 
ing Macomb clearance from 14 days to seven 
days is affirmed. 

New Orleans — Paramount Pictures Dist. 
Corp. vs. R. J. Burnett (Imperial). Para- 
mount complaint of non-fulfillment of con- 
tract by Burnett is dismissed. 

Cooperstown, N. Y. — William C. Smalley 
vs. Schine Enterprises. Gloversville. Over- 
buying complaint against Schine referred 



(Continued from page 1) 
vice-president. The following were 
elected directors for Kansas : E. B. 
Danielson, Russell ; Sam Blair, Belle- , 
ville, and A. F. Baker, Kansas City, 
Kan. Missouri directors were elected - 
as follows : Frank Weary, Richmond ; 
Edwards and Mrs. A. Baier, Kansas 
City, Mo. 

H. R. Biechele, K. M. T. A. sec- 
retary-treasurer, who was chairman, 
stressed the necessity of a strong 
organization in view of impending leg- 
islation in Kansas for a state sales 
tax and in Missouri for an amuse- i 
ment tax. 

Other speakers were Lester Mar- 
tin, secretary of Allied of Iowa and 
Nebraska and Judge Emmett Thur- 
man, counsel for the Rocky Moun- 
tain Theatre Owners' Ass'n. 

Also adopted was a resolution op- 
posing M-G-M's invasion of the trail- 
er field and another, introduced by 
C. A. Schultz, head of Commonwealth ' j 
Theatres, calling on Division Admin- 
istrator Sol A. Rosenblatt to give ' J 
code assentors action on labor com- j 
plaints against violating exhibitors. ' 



Upholds Food Show Plan 

St. Louis, July 17. — The local griev- . 
ance board has ruled the revised plan - 
for the food show conducted by the j x 
Rialto, Granite City, 111., does not con- : 
stitute a lottery or violate the code. 
Gaylord W. Jones, operator, testified ; r 
yesterday it was not necessary to buy ' > 
a ticket or attend the theatre to win 
a merchandise prize. 



Para. Wins Cincy Case 

Cincinnati, July 17. — Paramount 
has won an arbitration case involving 
failure to play or pay for pictures un- 
der contract against Leo Stephany, 
operating the Music Hall, Newport, 
Ky., across the river from here. 



Johnson on Code 

Hollywood, July 17. — Administra- 
tor Hugh Johnson is scheduled to de- 1 
liver an address in the Hollywood ' < 
Bowl Friday. His subject matter is 
expected to touch on films and the - > 
NRA code. 

back to Albany grievance board for rehear- i , 
ing. j X 

Norfolk, Va. — Lichtman Theatres pro- 
test to Washington clearance and zoning 
board. Local board's decision is affirmed. 

San Francisco — M. L. Markowitz 
(Davies) vs. Mason-Ellis Corp. (Casino). 
Grievance board's finding in complaint of 
reduced admissions at Casino is affirmed w ith 
the modification that free parking service 
is not a violation of the code lottery and 
prize scheme clause. 

Indianapolis — Harry Nagel (Dream) vs; 
Northern Theatres. Inc. (Rivoli). Griev- 
ance board's finding in reduced admission 
complaint against the Rivoli is affirmed. 

The Campi appeal committee yesterday 
heard the overbuying complaint brought bv : . 
the Broadway, Council Bluffs, la., against 
Fox West Coast's Strand and Liberty, and 
the reduced admissions complaint brought 
against the Orpheum. Fairfield, Neb., bv the » 
KMMJ Radio Theatre, Clay Center. Neb. 
Both cases were appeals from Omaha 
grievance board rulings. The Campi appeal 
committee, of which Ed Kuykendall was 
chairman, reserved decision. Other mem- 
bers of the committee were Leon Rosen- 
Matt, exhibitor, and Willard C. McKay of 
Universal, distributor. 

Another appeal hearing will be held todav 
with W. C. Michel of Fox as chairman of 
the committee. 



_ 



The Leading 


pewspap 




oi.the 

^ *C 1 

Motion|| 


w 


Picture 




Industry 







MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Alert, 
Intelligent 

and' s':'y~ r : \ 
Faithful 
Service to 
the Industry 
in All 
Branches 



VOL. 36. NO. 15 



NEW YORK, THURSDAY, JULY 19, 1934 



TEN CENTS 



Triples Back 
In Fight for 
Kid Business 



Neighborhoods Reverting 
To Policy for Summer 

Triple features are again in vogue 
it neighborhood theatres for the sum- 
ner months. 

With schools closed, exhibitors are 
naking a grand stand play for juvenile 
ittendance. 

Where heretofore duals and one or 
wo shorts have been making up the 
najority of independents' programs, 
exhibitors are eliminating shorts for 
i third feature, booked in for the first 
:wo shows. 

Westerns and outdoor attractions 
jsually are booked as the third fea- 
:ure. Exhibitors find triples good 
jusiness getters for children and even 
300k them on holidays. 



Para. Trustees Join 
In Revision of Suit 

Charles D. Hilles, Eugene W. 
Leake and Charles E. Richardson, 
Paramount Publix trustees, are made 
jarties to a revised action against 
he 1931-32 directors of the company 
o recover $13,600,000 expended in the 
epurchase of stock issued in the ac- 
juisition of theatres. 

Revision of the action, originally 
lied in May, was necessitated by the 
:hange in the legal status of Para- 
nount Publix and the trustees under 
he new bankruptcy laws. Defendants 
n the action, who were directors of 
a aramount when the repurchases were 
luthorized, are required to file an an- 
.wer within the next few weeks. 



Schwartz and Seider 
Pool Plan Cools Off 

The contemplated pooling of the 
A. H. Schwartz and Joseph Seider 
Long Island houses, virtually set 10 
days ago, has cooled and probably 
will not be consummated, it was 
learned yesterday. 

Approximately 40 houses were in- 
volved in the proposed pool, 21 of 
which are embraced by S eider's Pru- 
dential circuit and the remainder in 
Schwartz's Century circuit. 



IT OA Laying Plans 
To Fight Campaign 

Developments in the church cam- 
paign against films were discussed 
yesterday at the regular meeting of 
I. T. O. A. here and plans will be 

(Continued on page 6) 



The Decency Campaign* 
Inside and Out 



w 



By MARTIN QUIGLEY 



HEN in recent weeks the current campaign of pro- 
test on motion pictures became discernible in the huge proportions 
it had assumed, the motion picture industry found itself at the bar of 
public opinion, confronted with the severest test it has encountered 
in its whole history. 

That such a test should finally have arrived was a matter of very 
little surprise to many persons in the industry, including the writer, 
who during many years and on innumerable occasions in these 
columns has called attention to the gathering of the storm clouds. 
The warnings from this and many other sources, inside and outside 
the industry, were largely disregarded. Hollywood continued to 
make some pictures which were violently at conflict with the 
requirements of mass entertainment and — what was considerably 
worse — to include in many otherwise wholesome films sequences 
and bits of dialogue which reeked with vulgarity and obscenity. 

Many persons in the production branch of the industry proved, 
virtually to the satisfaction of everyone except themselves, that they 
had fallen distinctly out of step with the march of public opinion. 
An increasingly larger proportion of the product became out of tune 
with the thoughts, tastes and habits of the American public. Ex- 
hibitors everywhere, through their intimate contact with the general 
public, reported an increasing resentment. The industry's income 
suffered and except for the tremendous attraction of the motion 
picture which had long since been the public favorite amusement, it 
would have suffered a great deal more. Private protest was rampant. 
Finally a vast public protest, through the Legion of Decency cam- 
paign, became both distinctly audible and distinctly articulate. The 
rising tide of resentment against invasion of Amerian morality had 
found effective expression. Catholic organization and unity had 
given voice to a national reaction. The wonder is not that this 
public protest finally arrived, but rather that it did not arrive sooner. 

More Intelligence and More Decency 
Could Have Averted Hurt to Industry 

The industry has been hurt and hurt severely — not only in the 
loss of possible immediate revenue but also in the loss of a vast 
public goodwill. There has been a loss not only of much goodwill 
but also another loss in the fact that much of the enormous public 
interest in motion pictures, which does so much to keep alive the 
theatre-going habit, has been diverted in the direction of critical and 
destructive discussion. 

All of this is unfortunate, extremely so, especially because it 

might so easily have been avoided had there been a little more 

intelligence in many places and a little more common decency 

in some places. 

Those whose recalcitrance made possible these hurts to the indus- 
try, which could not have been inflicted had not the industry 
permitted itself to become vulnerable, have no cause to complain. 
Their stubbornness against advice, their wily escapes from safe- 
guards which authorities of the industry were attempting to arrange 
about them not only made possible but welcomed the national pro- 
test and its attendant consequences. 

For more than four years the industry has been publicly 
committed to a reasonable and workable plan of self-regulation. 
Throughout all of this time Mir. Will H. Hays and his assistants 

(Continued on page 4) 



Most of New 
Code Signers 
Already Paid 

Had Sent in Assessments 
To Get Cancellations 



Exhibitors who are taking advan- 
tage of the final opportunity for sign- 
ing assents to the code are largely 
those who have paid their code as- 
sessment in order to obtain the 10 per 
cent cancellation privilege, it was 
stated yesterday at Campi headquar- 
ters. 

Approximately 350 exhibitors paid 
assessments to obtain the cancellation 
privilege without signing the code. 
The bulk of these are now filing their 
assents with the reopening of code 
signing. 

A Campi appeal committee consist- 
ing of W. C. Michel, chairman ; Frank 
McCarthy and Joseph Seider heard 

(Continued on page 8) 



New Companies Get 
3 St. Louis Houses 

St. Louis, July 18. — In furtherance 
of their plans for the rehabilitation of 
the Ambassador, Missouri and Grand 
Central interests represented by the 
bondholders' protective committees 
have formed new corporations to hold 
the properties. The companies are the 
Ambassador Building Corp. and the 
Missouri Theatre Building Corp. 

They propose to lease the theatres 
to operating companies being organ- 
ized by Allan Snyder and Harry 
Koplar. The operating companies are 

(Continued on page 8) 

Must Get First Run 
Showings- Johnston 

Buffalo, July 18. — "We must have 
first run showing in every town this 
season," W. Ray Johnston, president 
of Monogram, declared during a visit 
here. 

Johnston, accompanied by C. King 
Charney, American distributor of 
Agfa film, stopped off to see Jack L. 

(Continued on page 8) 

Frisco Houses May 
Reopen on Friday 

San Francisco, July 18. — While the 
general strike here appears to be show- 
ing signs of collapse, theatre execu- 
tives have agreed not to reopen their 
houses until word comes from the Cen- 
tral Labor Council that they may do 
so. It is predicted local theatres will 
be relighted Friday. The strike is 
causing the general re-booking of 
films. 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Thursday, July 19, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 

(Registered U. S. Patent Office) 



Vol. 36 



July 19, 1934 



No. 15 



Martin Quigley 
Editor-Chief and Publisher 
MAURICE KANN 

Editor 
JAMES A. CRON 
Advertising Manager «— ■■" 




Published daily except Sunday and holi- 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub- 
sidiary of Quigley Publications, Inc., 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 1790 Broadway, New 
York. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Cable ad- 
dress "Quigpubco, New York." All con- 
tents copyrighted 1934 by Motion Picture 
Daily, Inc. Address all correspondence to 
the New York Office. Other Quigley pub- 
lications: MOTION PICTURE HERALD, 
BETTER THEATRES, THE MOTION 
PICTURE ALMANAC and THE CHI- 
CAGOAN. 

Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Lite 
Building, Vine and Yucca Streets, Victor 
M. Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 407 
South Dearborn Street, Edwin S. Clif- 
ford, Manager; London Bureau: Remo 
House, 310 Regent St., London, W. 1, 
Bruce Allan, Representative. Cable address: 
"Quigpubco, London"; Berlin Bureau: 
Berlin - Tempelhof , Kaiserin - Augustastrasse 
28, Joachim K. Rutenberg, Representative; 
Paris Bureau: 19, Rue de la Cour-des- 
Noues, Pierre Autre, Representative; Rome 
Bureau: Viale Gorizia, Vittorio Malpassuti, 
Representative; Sydney Bureau, 102 Sus- 
sex Street, Cliff Holt, Representative; Mex- 
ico City Bureau: Apartado 269, James 
Lockhart, Representative; Glasgow Bureau: 
86 Dundrennan Road, G. Holmes, _ Repre- 
sentative; Budapest Bureau: 3, Kaplar-u, 
Budapest, II, Endre Hevesi, Representa- 
tive. 

Entered as second class matter, January 
4, 1926 at the Post Office at New York 
City, N. Y., under Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada $15 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 



Clyde W. Simons Dead 

Las Animas, Col., July 18. — Clyde 
W. Simons, owner of the Simons 
here, died in Pueblo, Col., where he 
had gone for treatment. He is sur- 
vived by his wife, Dorinda, and two 
children, Robert and Doris. 



Oregon Managers Shift 

Portland, July 18. — Ernest A. 
Rose, former assistant manager of the 
Orpheum, Spokane, has been named 
manager of the State. Russell Brown, 
former manager of the State, becomes 
manager of the Orpheum. 



Extend Fox Receivership 

The Fox Theatres Corp. receiver- 
ship was extended six months to Jan. 
22, 1935, by Federal Judge Martin J. 
Manton yesterday. William Atkinson 
continues as receiver. 



M-G-M Borrows Brent 

Hollywood, July 18. — M-G-M has 
borrowed George Brent from Warners 
for the lead opposite Greta Garbo in 
"The Painted Veil." 



Paramount Signs Landi 

Hollywood, July 18. — Paramount 
has signed Elissa Landi to a long 
term contract. Her first will be 
"Enter Madame." 



Plan Northwest Circuit 

Portland, July 18. — Paul R. Aust 
and others have incorporated Inde- 
pendent Theatre Owners, Inc., for the 
purpose of operating a circuit. 



Jury Again Refuses 
Memphis Indictment 

Memphis, July 18. — A double 
wedge has now been driven in the 
fight for Sunday shows, as the Grand 
Jury has refused for a second time to 
return an indictment against Charles 
Mensing, Orpheum manager, for his 
Sunday sandwich show. 

All downtown houses were open last 
Sunday. Waxners, Loew's State and 
Loew's Palace opened with a $50 guar- 
antee each to the Memphis Community 
Fund and with no sandwiches. Col. 
Cecil E. Vogel, Loew city manager, 
and William Hendricks, Warner man- 
ager, were arrested with Mensing. 



M-G-M Trailers Hit 
By KMT A Resolution 

Resolutions objecting to M-G-M's 
proposed distribution of its own trail- 
ers next season were adopted at the 
Kl.M.T.A. convention in Kansas City, 
and were wired in full to the Motion 
Picture Daily by A. F. Baker, presi- 
dent. 

The resolutions say no question of 
quality is involved and that the trail- 
ers will be an increased expense to 
exhibitors. Members are urged to re- 
sist "any attempt on the part of 
M-G-M to force the sale of their 
trailers with features." 



"Happy Returns" Top 
Of Herald Champions 

July "box-office champions" picked 
by the Motion Picture Herald are 
headed by "Many Happy Returns." 
There are seven on the list. 

The other six are : "The Thin 
Man," "Little Miss Marker," "Little 
Man, What Now?" "Operator 13," 
"Glamour" and "Smarty." 



Bernhard to Distribute 

London, July 18. — Negotiations 
are pending, according to Fred Bern- 
hard, who recently returned from a 
five-week trip to New York, whereby 
he may return to distributing. He has 
succeeded in locating a lineup of in- 
dependent American product, he 
claims, and should the deal materialize, 
three-quarters of his concern's product 
will be provided by America. 



Mississippi Group 
Forms a New Ass'n. 



Jackson, Miss., July 18. — The 
Mississippi M. P. Theatres Ass'n. has 
been formed here with R. X. Williams 
of Oxford as president. 

Leaders in the new organization 
hope to maintain friendly relations 
with Tri-State and the M.P.T.O.A., 
since Williams is secretary-treasurer 
of Tri-State. 

Other officers elected were : Vice- 
president, J. A. West, Philadelphia; 
secretary-treasurer, Earl Elkins, Ab- 
erdeen. Another meeting has been 
set for October. 

Formation of the association was 
due to a belief of Mississippi exhib- 
itors that they should have an organi- 
zation confined to the problems of 
their own state. 



"V" Office Abroad 
Is Moved to London 

Universal is shifting continental 
headquarters to London and, at the 
same time, has withdrawn from Ger- 
many. Max Friedland, Berlin mana- 
ger, will handle European supervision 
from London. 

United Artists was the first major 
company to concentrate continental 
control in London under Maury Sil- 
verstone. Warners was the first com- 
pany to step out of Germany, as re- 
ported in Motion Picture Daily 
from the company's Atlantic City re- 
gional meeting some weeks ago. 



Bergner as "Joan"? 

London, July 18. — Elizabeth Berg- 
ner will essay the lead in George Ber- 
nard Shaw's "St. Joan" next season 
for C. B. Cochran, according to local 
report. Shaw is also said to be re- 
vising the play for film production. 



Katharine Hepburn originally was 
slated to do "Joan of Arc" for Radio 
next season, but the picture has been 
set back and may not be made at all. 



Mitzi Green Returning 

Hollywood, July 18. — Mitzi Green, 
now 16, will make her return to pic- 
tures after a long absence in an in- 
genue role in Reliance's "Transatlan- 
tic Merry-Go-Round," which United 
Artists will release. 



Eastman Up 3% on Big Board 



Columbia Pictures, vtc. 



Fox Film "A" 
Loew's, Inc. . 



RKO 

Warner Bros. 









Net 




High 


Low 


Close 


Change 


Sales 


28% 


2SVs 


28% 


+154 


500 


3 


3 


3 




100 


1254 


12 


12 


- 54 
+3J4 


600 


101 v t 


100/s 


10154 


400 


1154 


II/2 


1154 




300 


27% 


27 


27% 


+1 


500 


9054 


9054 


90</ 2 




100 


3{4 


3% 


3% 




800 


2 


m 


m 




300 


1954 




19% 


+ X 


100 




7 


2 


- 'A 


600 


4% 


454 


454 




900 



Technicolor Rises V2 on Curb 

Net 

High Low Close Change 

Technicolor 13% 13% !3% +54 

Trans Lux 1% IH 1% 

Paramount Bond Issues Decline 

Net 

High Low Close Change 

General Theatre Equipment 6s '40 7 6% 6% — H 

Keith B. F. 6s '46 67% 67% 67% + % 

Loew's 6s '41, ww deb rights 100% 100% 100% + % 

Paramount F. L. 6s '47 47 47 47 —1% 

Paramount Publix 554s *50 46% 46% 4634 —1 

Pathe 7s '37, ww 99% 99% 99% 

Warner Bros. 6s '39, wd 5354 52J4 5254 — 54 



Sales 

300 
100 



Sales 

7 



< Purely 
Personal ► 

LILLY MESSINGER, who haj 
been in the Radio story depart* 
ment for the past four years, ha I 
been appointed English representati vj 
for the department. She will sai 
Saturday on the Paris. 

Chris Buckley, Albany first run 
operator, won't be telephoning friend* 
late at night for some time now. JimB 
my Grainger supplied the cure art! 
can explain. 

Herb Cruikshank postcards rel 
gards from Stratford-on-Avon, madB 
famous by a fellow named WiB 
Shakespeare. 

Mrs. Martha Fait, wife ofl 
Warners' general manager in Rio dfl 
Janeiro, arrives today on the AmerM 
can Legion. 

Ambrose S. Dowling, Europeai 
sales manager for RKO Export CorpB 
is in town. He arrived on thJ 

Olympic. 

Wesley Eddy will go back to thfl 
Roxy as master of ceremonies as sooB 
as he finishes his current radio ami 
stage engagement. 

Morris Kinzler postcards frorjj 
Camp Horicon in the Adirondacks anfj 
describes himself as "ye olde vacaa 
tioner." 

Verree Teasdale is in town on } 
shopping trip prior to her marriagli 
to Adolphe Menjou. 

Harold B. Franklin is summer' 
ing on the Connecticut shore, nea 
Darien. 

Joe E. Goltz, M-G-M manager i 
Montevideo, arrives today on tl 
American Legion. 

Dave Palfreyman has acquired 
new set of irons with which he 
punishing Queens' fairways. 

Lou Brock, Radio associate pre 
ducer, came in yesterday on the Re 
from a European vacation. 

Ed Kuykendall left yesterday fc 
his Columbus, Miss., home. 



Two Join Mundus Stafi 

William G. Minder and John Fra 
coni have joined the Mundus Distri 
uting Corp. as sales representatives 
the southern territory. Minder w 
cover Charlotte, New Orleans a 
Atlanta, where he will make his hea 
quarters. Franconi will cover the D 
las territory. 



Goldwyn May Do "0*\ 

Hollywood, July 18. — Having on< 
cancelled "The Wizard of Oz 
Samuel Goldwyn is withdrawing tl 
story from the shelf and will make 
this year, providing a treatment sui 
able for both child and adult audiena 
can be worked out. Tests of key pla; 
ers are under way. 



Sets Up First Run 

Monogram reports first run dea 
closed for "Jane Eyre" at Warner 
Carleton, Philadelphia; the Stanle 
Atlantic City, and the Uptown, Kai 
sas City. 



TV. L. Nathanson Sailin 

Toronto, July 18.— N. L. Nathai 
son, president of Famous Playe 
Canadian Corp., sails for England c 
August 4. 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Thursday, July 19. 1934, 



"Sunday School Mien " No Need 



Envisions No 
Serious Check 
On Film Types 



(Continued from page 1) 

have labored earnestly and vigor- 
ously to obtain reasonable con- 
formance with the requirements of 
the plan. Company heads have 
issued order and order, but various 
persons in the Hollywood colony 
made it their business to evade and 
to circumvent the regulations. The 
only code to which their conduct 
indicated a real allegiance was 
a code under which they would 
make pictures to suit themselves, 
and the decent public be damned. 

And now there is chaos and 
confusion — not in the councils of 
the industry but in certain quar- 
ters of its production branch. In 
the councils of the industry the 
road ahead is clear and distinct. 
The industry's product needs 
regulation and it is going to get 
it. Those who have in the past 
been eloquent in their excuses 
for non-conformance, and clever 
in their evasions of the rule to 
which the industry is committed, 
are going to be shown the way to 
follow in their work or — the way 
out of it. 

Some of the chaos and confu- 
sion which exists is legitimate and 
inevitable. The uncalled for 
vehemence which has character- 
ized some of the public criticism 
of the industry has created a state 
of nerves among many persons 
engaged in production who have 
little knowledge of the moral 
values of public entertainment 
and the effects of entertainment 
on the public mind. In this lack 
of knowledge these persons are 
by no means curiosities alongside 
of the general run of humanity. 
Because motion pictures 
happen to entail a definite 
moral significance there is no 
good reason for assuming or 
expecting all persons engaged 
in producing them to have 
more than an average under- 
standing of the laws of 
morality — and this existing 
average is by no means high, 
whether one examines the 
field of motion picture pro- 
duction or any other field. 
What many of the recent 
"over-night experts" on the ques- 
tion of the moral character of 
motion pictures do not seem to 
understand is that even if 
through some miracle all of the 
producers suddenly became pos- 
sessed of ideas identical with 
theirs, and immediately proceeded 
to determine that all pictures 



should be produced accordingly, 
still in the resultant pictures the 
principles aimed at would not be 
uniformly maintained. Such is 
the nature of the complex and 
difficult business of producing 
motion pictures. 

Many persons, who are now 
gravely concerned over the sub- 
ject matter of pictures, appear 
determined to assume that any 
and every transgression against 
the moral law which has ap- 
peared in pictures has been placed 
there designedly. Some even go 
so far as to insist that Hollywood 
has been conducting an organ- 
ized campaign to ruin the morals 
of the nation. These unsound 
and unreasonable views, when 
publicly aired, serve not to hasten 
the day when pictures will main- 
tain a higher moral standard ; but 
rather to create a state of con- 
fusion and distrust which renders 
an early and adequate solution of 
the problem more difficult. 

Almost tragic consequences 
already are to be noted aris- 
ing out of the inconsisten- 
cies appearing in lists of con- 
demned pictures which have 
been widely published. 

These efforts are a sad re- 
flection on both the intelli- 
gence and fairness of their 
sponsors. If one did not 
know better, the only tenable 
explanation of these incon- 
sistencies would be that per- 
sons responsible for them 
were floundering helplessly 
in a morass of confusion and 
misunderstanding as to what 
actually constitutes and de- 
termines moral values. 
It would seem that these per- 
sons do not possess even a penny 
catechism education as to what 
is right and what is wrong in the 
moral values of public entertain- 
ment. 

The almost tragic consequences 
referred to are the state of mind 
created among many producers 
and its incidental confusion and 
misunderstanding. 

They have been looking to 
those who are, or think they are, 
spokesmen for the campaign of 
protest for guidance as to what 
they want. 

Not all of them understand 
very clearly abstract moral argu- 
ments but all of them do under- 
stand very clearly the subject of 
motion pictures. 

Deplores Sporadic 
Listing of Films 

They want to know what kind 
of pictures are wanted and they 
want the reply expressed con- 
cretely in the naming of pictures. 

But instead of receiving this 
sort of guidance, to which they 
are eminently entitled, they find 
authorities in one locality listing 
as acceptable a certain picture 



and in an adjoining territory the 
equivalent local authority con- 
demning the same picture. 

Local authorities may revel in 
the consciousness of their un- 
questioned authority to do pre- 
cisely as they see fit but mean- 
while they may well realize that 
they are seriously jeopardizing 
the objective which both they 
and the authorities of the motion 
picture industry are commonly 
interested in — perhaps from dif- 
ferent motives hut still common- 
ly interested in; namely, the 
maintenance of right moral stan- 
dards in motion picture enter- 
tainment. 

One leading producer recently 
stated : 

"The situation looks desperate 
to me. I feel that I might just as 
well ignore what these campaign- 
ers are asking for even though 
they will probably put me out of 
business in the long run for fight- 
ing them. The way I figure it is 
this: They want me to make 
only wishy-washy, milk and 
water kind of pictures and I 
know as a showman if I do this 
the theatre-goers will put me out 
of business. So any way I look 
at it I seem to be licked." 

Outl ines Material 
Regarded Suitable 

The expressed attitude of this 
producer is perhaps not typical of 
the attitude entertained by many 
producers but he is not entirely 
alone. In one degree or another 
the thought of this producer has 
penetrated widely throughout the 
industry. If some of the thought 
and effort which has been de- 
voted to just a plain bawling out 
of the picture business had been 
devoted to a simple and authori- 
tative statement of what the 
legionaires of decency want the 
cause of better pictures would 
have been materially advanced at 
this point. 

What the crusaders want and 
what they are entitled to have 
from the motion picture indus- 
try are pictures which are not 
subversive of individual morality. 
They do not want the mo- 
tion pictures geared to the 
mentality of a fourteen-year- 
old child. 

They do not object to red- 
blooded, virile drama. 

They are quite definitely 
aware of the fact that there is 
sin in the world and the sin- 
ner and his sin may be 
treated dramatically. 
They do insist, however, that 
the sinner shall not be made to 
appear as a saint; neither that 
the saint shall be depicted as the 
sinner. While they hold that 
there are certain facts of life 
which are not proper subject mat- 
ter for theatrical treatment, they 
object to no legitimate dramatic 



Scores Those 
Who Seek to 
Foist Censors 

situation, provided only that 
when moral delinquency is de- 
picted it is used to tell the story 
or to establish the character and 
not for the purpose, or in the 
manner, of presenting a lustful 
exhibit. They do not think that 
dancing girls should be clad in 
coonskin overcoats but they are 
equally positive that there is a 
reasonable limit to the exposure 
of the feminine form in public 
entertainment. 

They know that when this 
reasonable limit is transgressed it 
is done less for art's sake than 
for reasons which need no de- 
tailed exposition here. 

Out of the temper of the day 
it perhaps is inevitable that many 
persons concerned with produc- 
tion should imagine — in the ab- 
sence of exact knowledge of their 
own and in the presence of con- 
fused and vague assertions on the 
part of complainants — that the 
theme province of the motion 
picture will have to be seriously 
restricted in order to conform 
with popular demand and that 
they will be expected generally to 
assume in their work a Sunday- 
school mien. 

This, definitely, is not 
needed and not expected. 
Every reasonable demand as 
to the character of pictures 
may be answered and there 
will still remain all of the 
scope that is necessary or de- 
sirable in the selection of 
themes and in the writing of 
treatments. 

It now appears that many cus- 
todians of the public welfare who 
for many years quite neglected to 
take the motion picture and its 
social consequences seriously — 
when they well might have done 
so, meanwhile learning something 
of the size and complexity of the 
question — have suddenly blos- 
somed out, in the warming light 
of the vast publicity which has 
been directed toward motion pic- 
tures, with rather detailed plans 
as to what should be done about 
it all. Unfortunately, most of 
these plans are predicated on 
such ignorance of the funda- 
mentals involved that they serve 
at this time only to delay and 
handicap the movement toward 
the commonly desired objective. 

In the face, for instance, of a 
long record of municipal and 
statewide censorship of motion 
pictures in which the accomplish- 

(Continued on page 5) 



Thursday. July 19, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



5 



Urges Patience, Understanding 



Necessary in 
Accomplishing 
Moral Rebirth 



(Continued from page 4) 

ments have been virtually nil we 
rind many of the overnight ex- 
perts sxultant in the thought that 
they have hit upon a solution of 
the problem and the solution 
which they urge is that the clum- 
sy and not too honest or genuine 
hand of political censorship be 
laid upon the motion picture. 

If the industry were not seri- 
ously inclined to win and retain 
the goodwill of the intelligent 
leaders of public opinion it might 
welcome censorship as a means 
of quickly putting an end to 
many of its past and current dif- 
ficulties. 

Under censorship the industry 
could conduct its dealings with 
the political appointees of the 
censor board to whom the public 
would be politely advised to ad- 
dress their grievances. The 
standards of the boards would be 
the varying standards of the day, 
subjected to such modification 
from time to time as the well-or- 
ganized and exceedingly active 
political minorities could effect. 

Then there are those proposed 
solutions of the problem which 
are predicated on the introduc- 
tion in various localities of spe- 
cialized procedure. These lose 
sight of the fact that the motion 
picture industry is a nationally 
operating institution and that it 
can no more enter into special- 
ized arrangements for particular 
localities than it could entertain 
propositions to enter into similar 
compacts with particular groups, 
associations and societies. These, 
also are distinctly un-catholic in 
character because they assume 
that the public in one locality is 
entitled to have or needs to have 
pictures different from those 
which the public in every other 
locality is entitled to have and 
needs to have. The principles 
which the industry is committed 
to maintain in its motion pictures 
are universal in character and 
changeless as to the passing of 
time. The resultant pictures will 
be and must be equally as accept- 
able in one place as in another. 

The whole public and not some 
particular segment of it must be 
served and in a uniform manner. 
The only workable and 
reasonable attack on the 
problem is the one which 
comprises the proper regula- 
tion of the product at the 
source of its production. This 
obviously can only be done 



by those who control produc- 
tion. Arid even though it 
were possible to interject 
some other influence at the 
source of production — or at 
any other point between the 
studio and the screen — the 
authority which is the pro- 
ducer's should be left with 
him and, more especially, the 
responsibility should be left 
with him. 

The effort of those who control 
production, to adjust the char- 
acter of the product in keeping 
with sound and reasonable ideas 
of morality is not a new effort. 
Nearly a quarter of a century 
ago, in the midst of the infancy 
days of the industry, the Na- 
tional Board of Review was or- 
ganized. It is true that it failed 
to accomplish the desired results 
but the record remains as proof 
that the industry recognized its 
responsibility and sought to dis- 
charge it. 

Cites Code Effort 
Launched in 1930 

When Will Hays some twelve 
years ago entered the industry he 
immediately proceeded to draft 
certain regulations governing the 
moral character of pictures. 
These regulations were found to 
be inadequate and even in their 
inadequacy they failed of effec- 
tive application. But still the ef- 
fort was made. 

In 1930 through the Produc- 
tion Code of Morals the industry 
entered upon the soundest and 
broadest plan of regulation which 
had ever been thought of or at- 
tempted in the whole history of 
theatrical entertainment. De- 
monstrable results of enormous 
proportions were accomplished 
through this Code. Those who 
deny this fact are exposing them- 
selves to the charge of simply not 
knowing what they are talking 
about. It is true that while this 
Code as applied from 1930 to date 
accomplished much it did not ac- 
complish enough. But to hold 
the industry alone accountable 
for failure to accomplish ade- 
quate results is in the first place 
neglecting to consider the frailty 
of man and in the second and 
many subsequent places it is neg- 
lecting to understand that the 
Code did not have active support 
of a sufficiently interested public 
opinion; that the source material 
of the producer was constantly 
becoming muddier through the 



lowering of moral standards in 
the popular novel and stage play 
and that many millions of our 
fellow citizens, including great 
numbers among the ecclesiastical 
followers of those who are now 
the industry's chief critics, con- 
cerned themselves not at all with 
the moral significance of motion 
pictures and did in fact freely 
tolerate those types of pictures 
against which complaint is now 
being made. 

Tolerance Towards 
Industry Is Urged 

The motion picture industry 
can do much and will do much 
but it cannot perform miracles. 
If the desired objective is to be 
attained there must be patience 
and a sympathetic understanding 
of the industry's methods, prob- 
lems and efforts. The fact that 
such patience and such sympa- 
thetic understanding is enter- 
tained in the highest councils of 
the campaign of protest is a 
brilliant ray of hope illuminating 
the prospect of a great accom- 
plishment to the end of enabling 
the motion picture consistently to 
be a healthy influence on the 
character of the people and at the 
same time rendering the industry 
a healthier and more secure 
business. 

The motion picture needs 
the intelligent guidance of a 
uniform and united public 
opinion. The great objective 
of the aroused public opinion 
in the question of the moral 
character of motion pictures 
is being jeopardized by the 
lack of such uniformity. 
The problem is common to all 
people everywhere. Methods of 
correcting the evils which will be 
effective at all will be effective 
everywhere. Great numbers of 
the public can be kept away from 
motion pictures for the time be- 
ing and perhaps indefinitely. But 
such procedure would only be in- 
dicated if the motion picture 
were an evil thing, which it is 
not. Hence any campaign which 
has no objective other than to 
keep people away from motion 
pictures is not reasonable, nor 
just. Such campaigns which 
have been undertaken obviously 
must be intended somehow to in- 
fluence the producers who have 
the authority and also the respon- 
sibility over the character of the 
product. 

That the producers have been 



influenced is a matter of public 
record. What they propose to 
do now, in a uniform, national 
manner toward discharging their 
responsibility is likewise a matter 
of public record. The quality of 
their good faith is naturally 
something that only time will tell. 
However, the quality of their 
plan, its soundness, its thorough- 
ness and its workableness is 
something susceptible to immedi- 
ate proof. 

If, then, the plan is what it 
is represented to be — and if 
it is the soundest and safest 
means of reaching the de- 
sired objective — those genu- 
inely interested in its accom- 
plishment should see to it 
that the necessary support of 
public opinion is main- 
tained; that the necessary 
help and encouragement is 
extended and that amateur 
tinkers are not allowed to im- 
peril the achievement of a 
great moral victory. 

Pastor Gives Films 
Blame for Drought 

Kansas City, July 18. — Films have 
been blamed for many things, but it 
remained for Rev. Alvin G. Hause to 
charge them with responsibility for 
the summer-long drought. 

Calling all who believe in the effi- 
cacy of prayer to gather at his Bales 
Baptist church here for the purpose of 
praying for rain, the reverend declared 
the seared fields and crop destruction 
by insects this summer is punishment 
by God for the nation's transgressions. 
Among these he listed : "Filth in our 
movie theatres ; cheap, lurid and often 
immoral magazines filling our news- 
stands." 

Buffalo Councilman 
To Ask Film Action 

Buffalo, July 18. — A resolution 
placing the Buffalo city government 
on record as joining the clean films 
movement will be presented to the 
Common Council July 24 by Council- 
man-at-Large Martin O. Bement. The 
resolution says in part : 

"Those of us who have small chil- 
dren and all of us who are endeavor- 
ing to lead clean and respectable fives 
have come to the conclusion that the 
day has passed when movie producers 
shall fatten their wallets by turning 
out inferior products that appeal only 
to the baser elements." 



Columbus, July 18. — "The Legion 
of Decency has won its fight for clean 
motion pictures," said Monsignor 
Henry Grimmelsman, rector of the 
Pontifical College Josephenium here 
and chancellor of the Council of 
Bishops of the American hierarchy, in 
speaking before the convention of the 
state branch of the Catholic Central 
Society in session at Allentown, Pa. 



Iowa Houses Opening 

Des Moines, July 18. — Iowa the- 
atres are opening. Latest on the list 
are : Monte, Monticello ; Palace, Extra 
and Pell, Pella. 



Reprints Available 

Reprints of Martin Quigley's editorial, "The De- 
cency Campaign — Inside and Out," will be available 
for a limited period at 10 cents a copy, or $5 a hundred. 



6 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Thursday, July 19, 1934 



Clean Film Drives 
Draw Writers' Fire 

Hollywood, July 18. — The Screen 
Writers' Guild and the Authors' 
League of America yesterday loosed 
a counter-blast against certain phases 
of the present campaign against inde- 
cent films. "Ax grinding of special 
interests," was charged. 

The writers expressed resentment at 
"the intemperance, hysteria, injustice 
and in some cases outright falsehood 
which characterize certain expres- 
sions" of the protests against "evi- 
dences of vulgarity and bad taste" in 
pictures. 

A statement issued by heads of the 
writers' organizations said, in part, 
"the zeal of reforming bodies always 
remains unsatisfied until it has reached 
the point where it may order the 
American people as to what they may 
or may not see." 

ITOA Laying Plans 
To Fight Campaign 

(Continued from pane 1) 

formulated at next Wednesday's meet- 
ing for exhibitor action in connection 
with the campaign. 

It was stated at the meeting that 
Lowell Mason, former counsel for the 
NRA Review Board, will discuss the 
church campaign on WOR, tomorrow 
evening. 



Kansas City, July 18. — With issu- 
ance of a Legion of Decency call by 
Bishop Francis Johannes of the Leav- 
enworth diocese, the campaign against 
objectionable films is making rapid 
headway among Catholics in Kansas. 
Bishop Johannes is the third head of 
a diocese to enroll in the movement 
in Kansas-western Missouri. Two 
bishops in this territory are still to be 
heard from, those at Wichita, Kan., 
and St. Joseph, Mo. 

A tentative report on the Legion of 
Decency progress in Kansas City, Mo. 
which is in the diocese of Bishop 
Thomas F. Lillis, indicates that close 
to 20,000 pledges have been signed in 
the city proper. More than 3,000 
signed pledges have been turned in at 
St. James Church, the largest Cath- 
olic parish here. 



St. Louis, July 18. — Archbishop 
Glennon estimates 300,000 Catholics in 
this diocese have signed the Legion of 
Decency pledges. He says a confer- 
ence of parish leaders will be called 
later in the year to discuss the situa- 
tion from every viewpoint. 

Discussing recent Hollywood devel- 
opments, the archbishop said: "I hope 
they will fulfill their promises, yet I 
hesitate to make a prediction in view 
of what has happened in the past. You 
must remember the motion picture pro- 
ducers have had codes and censors, yet 
neither has succeeded in eliminating 
vulgar films." 

Richmond, July 18. — Latest to join 



Use Stickers Now 

Detroit, July 18.— Over 20,- 
000 auto windshield stickers 
reading: "We Demand Clean 
Movies" have been distrib- 
uted throughout the Catholic 
churches in metropolitan De- 
troit. 

They were issued by the 
Michigan Catholic, diocesan 
newspaper. 



the church film drive is the Baptist 
Young People's Union of Virginia. 
Presbyterians and Methodists have al- 
ready followed the Catholic lead. 



Marietta, O., July 18. — -"Clean" and 
"unclean" film lists are to be issued 
here by joint Catholic and Protestant 
action under a plan being worked out 

"Bondage" Is 
Washington's 
Two-Day Stir 

Washington, July 18. — In a week 
of falling grosses "Of Human Bond- 
age" was the only attraction to stir 
up any excitement here. In two days 
at RKO Keith's it piled up $5,300, 
more than "Let's Try Again" was able 
to catch in the first five days of the 
week. 

"Private Scandal" topped par by 
$200 at Loew's Columbia by grossing 
$3,300. "The Thin Man" fell off to 
$8,800 in its second week at Loew's 
Palace, but was held for a third. Busi- 
ness elsewhere was below normal. 

Total first run grosses were $60,900. 
Average is $71,200. 

Estimated takings, exclusive of tax, 
for the week ending July 12: 

"SHOOT THE WORKS" (Para.) 

EARXE— (2,218), 25c-77c, 7 days. Stage 
show. Gross: $16,500. (Average, $17,600) 
"PRIVATE SCANDAL" (Para.) 
LOEWS COLUMBIA— (1,265), 25c-40c, 7 
days. Gross: $3,300. (Average, $3,100) 
"MURDER IN THE PRIVATE CAR" 
(M-G-M) 

LOEW'S FOX— (3,434) . 25c-66c, 7 days. 
Stage show. Gross: $18,300. (Average, $20,- 
500) 

"THE THIN MAN" (M-G-M) 

LOEW'S PALACE-J(2,390), 35c-77c, 7 
days, 2nd week. Gross: $8,800. (Average, 
$14,500) 

"THE GREAT FLIRTATION" (Para.) 

METROPOLITAN— (1,591), 25c -40c, 7 
days. Gross: $3,500. (Average, $4,100) 
"LET'S TRY AGAIN" (Radio) 
RKO-KEITH'S— (1,850), 25c-55c, 5 days. 
Gross: $5,200. (Average, 7 days, $11,400) 
"OF HUMAN BONDAGE" (Radio) 
RKO-KEITH'S — Two days. Gross: $5,300. 
(Average, 7 days, $11,400) 



Canadian Loew Unit 
Shareholders Argue 

Toronto, July 18. — Shareholders of 
Loew's Canadian theatres companies 
adjourned until July 27 after a stormy 
meeting here today. At that time, 
they will meet with directors in an 
effort to iron out difficulties arising 
from the demand by protesting groups 
for a dividend declaration. 



Evergreen Men Coming 

Seattle, July 18. — Frank L. New- 
man, Sr., and Al Finkelstein, guiding 
executives of Evergreen State circuit, 
have gone to New York for the an- 
nual booking session of circuits affili- 
ated with Fox theatres. Al Rosen- 
berg, third partner in the circuit, re- 
mains here to supervise operations 
throughout the territory. 



To Rule on Bank Nights 

Kansas City, July 18. — The griev- 
ance board on Saturday will resume 
deliberations on evidence presented at 
an open hearing this afternoon on 
charges that bank nights constitute a 
lottery and are therefore a code vio- 
lation. A decision may be rendered 
at that time. 



by Rev. Fr. Robbin and Rev. Max- 
well Hull. 

Lakeside, O., July 18. — Seeking 
only good pictures and boycotting un- 
desirable ones is the way to settle the 
film problem, according to resolutions 
adopted by the Luther League conven- 
tion here. 

"Groom," Baer 
$19,000 Top, 
Philadelphia 

Philadelphia, July 18. — Though 
the $19,000 grossed by Max Baer in 
Person and "Here Comes the Groom" 
on the screen at the Earle was below 
expectations, it still gave the house 
its biggest intake in weeks and raised 
the general gross for the week. 

The weather break was somewhat 
better, but the church ban took a 
heavy toll. The Fox topped its aver- 
age with "Charlie Chan's Courage" 
and a stage show, but the rest of the 
houses came in under the mark. 

Total first run business was $51,- 
450. Average is $48,900. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 12: 

"HEART SONG" (Fox) 

ARCADIA— (600), 25c-40c-50c, 6 days. 
Gross: $1,750. (Average, $2,400) 
"HERE COMES THE GROOM" (Para.) 

EARLE— (2.000), 40c-55c-65c, 6 days. 
Stage: Max Baer and revue. Gross: $19,000. 
(Average, $12,000) 

"CHARLIE CHAN'S COURAGE" (Fox) 

FOX— (3,000), 30c-40c-60c, 6 days. Stage: 
Herb Williams, Ivy and Neecie Stevens, 
Captain Willie Mauss. Gross: $13,000. 
(Average, $12,000) 

"MOST PRECIOUS THING IN LIFE" 
(Col.) 

KARLTON— (1,000), 30c-40c-50c. 6 days. 
Gross: $2,400. (Average, $3,500) 

"SHOOT THE WORKS" (Para.) 
STANLEY— (3,700), 40c-55c-65c, 6 days. 
Gross: $9,500. (Average. $12,000) 
"MURDER ON THE BLACKBOARD" 
(Radio) 

STANTON— (1.700), 30c-40c-55c, 6 days. 
Gross: $5,800. (Average, $7,000) 



Hollywood Sees No 
Spread of Strikes 

Hollywood, July 18. — Possibilities 
of a general strike here in sympathy 
with the San Francisco walkout are 
regarded as very remote, but studios 
are stocking up with surplus materials 
to be prepared for any emergency. 

Union leaders are not talking strike. 



Seattle, July 18. — Indications are 
that there will be no theatre closings 
in this territory as a result of present 
labor conditions. 



7 Sign Writers' Code 

Hollywood, July 18. — Seven major 
studios have signed the writer-produ- 
cer code originally set up by the writ- 
ers' branch of the Academy and which 
will be circulated beginning tomor- 
row. Signers are Harry Cohn, Win- 
field Sheehan, Louis B. Mayer, Eman- 
uel Cohen, B. B. Kahane, Carl 
Laemmle, Jr., and Jack Warner. 



Griffith Opening Two 

Denver, July 18.— R. E. Griffith 
Theatres, Inc., are opening two new 
houses in New Mexico. They are the 
Rig at Hobbs, 500 seats, and the 
Cactus at Carlsbad, 700 seats. 



Text of Protestant 
Pledge Is Released 

The text of the Federal Council of 
the Churches of Christ in America 
pledge which Protestants will be 
asked to sign in the drive on objec- 
tionable pictures is as follows : 

For Better Motion Picture* 
DECLARATION OF PURPOSE 

(Sign and give to your pastor or 
organization) 

I wish to join with other Protestants, co- 
operating with Catholics and Jews, in con- 
demning vile and unwholesome moving pic- 
tures. I unite with all who protest against 
them as a grave menace to youth, to home 
life, to country, and to religion. 

I condemn absolutely those salacious mo- 
tion pictures which, with other degrading 
agencies, are corrupting public morals and 
promoting a sex mania in our land. 

I shall do all that I can to arouse public 
opinion against the portrayal of vice as a 
normal condition of affairs, and against de- 
picting criminals of any class as heroes and 
heroines, presenting their filthy philosophy 
of life as something acceptable to decent 
men and women. 

I unite with all who condemn the display 
of suggestive advertisements on billboards, 
at theatre entrances and the favorable 
notices given to immoral motion pictures. 

Considering these evils, I declare ray pur- 
pose to remain away from all motion pic- 
tures which offend decency and Christian 
morality. I will try to induce others to do 
the same. 

I make this protest in a spirit of self- 
respect, and with the conviction that the 
American public does not demand filthy pic- 
tures, but clean entertainment and educa- 
tional features. 

Name 

Address 

That there may be a united front, the 
pledge of the Legion of Decency has been 
used with only slight changes. Organiza- 
tions and individuals are free to formulate 
their own pledges. The important thing 
is not the form of a pledge but to keep 
its purpose. 

(Issued by the Federal Council of Churches. 
105 East 22nd Street. New York) 

The pledge is in duplicate, with a 
copy going to the signer and an- 
other to the pastor or organization. 
The above is the part retained by the 
pastor or organization. 



To Cancel in St. Louis 

St. Louis, July 18. — Members of the 
local M. P. T. O. decided at a meet- 
ing yesterday to exercise the privilege 
of cancelling contracts on pictures held 
publicly objectionable. They agreed 
not to show five pictures proscribed 
by the Legion of Decency — "The Life 
of Yergie Winters," "Laughing Boy," 
"Born to Be Bad," "Kiss and Make 
Up" and "Here Comes the Groom." 

These exhibitors will determine 
whether their theatres will extend the 
cancellations to include other films. 



To Test Crooker Play 

"Made in Heaven," a play by Her- 
bert Crooker, assistant to S. Charles 
Einfeld at the Warner home office, 
will be given a tryout at the Caldwell 
Summer Theatre, Caldwell, N. J., 
starting July 23, under the auspices 
of Martin Berkeley and Paul Groll. 



Fire on Franklin Estate 

Belle Island, Conn., July 18. — A 
garage fire on the estate of Harold 
B. Franklin here early today did $15.- 
000 damage. The blaze was discovered 
by Lois Moran, a guest of Arch Sel- 
wyn, whose residence is adjoining. 



In and Out 

Cleveland, July 18.— The 
Hanna, which opened Satur- 
day with duals contrary to 
the single feature policy 
which became effective 
throughout Greater Cleve- 
land on July 8, closed today. 



FACTS 



the; 

MOTION 
PICTURE 
ALMANAC 

is vised by smart show- 
men the world over. The 
1934-3 5 issue is bigger 
and more important than 
ever. 



OP 



in abundance 



WHO'S WHO. Minute biographies of more than 10,000 people who 
made and are making motion picture history in every branch of 
the industry. 

CORPORATE STRUCTURES, capital investments and annual finan- 
cial summaries of the leading corporations. An important yearly survey 
of the state of the industry. 

ANNUAL RELEASES, dates and titles, a resume of thousands of 
pictures listed by company and alphabetically for quick and easy reference. 

THEATRE CIRCUITS and Exhibitor Organizations. Checked for ac- 
curacy up to the last minute of publication. 

PRODUCING AND DISTRIBUTING organizations, list of personnel 
in studio and home office including all exchange staffs. 

FILM EDITORS of all the leading newspapers in the United States. 
Extremely valuable to producing organizations and to exhibitors. 

EQUIPMENT, A survey of the whole field of theatre maintenance and 
a complete list of theatre vendors. 

ABROAD. A perspective of the film situation in foreign countries and 
a list of important foreign film figures. 

And countless other important items of reference will be found in the 
new 1934-35 Motion Picture Almanac — now on the press — $5.00 the copy. 



MOTION PICTURE ALMANAC 



1790 BROADWAY 



NEW YORK CITY 



3 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Thursday, July 19, 1934 



Most of New 
Code Signers 
Already Paid 



(Continued from page 1) 
three cases appealed from local boards 
yesterday. The cases were a com- 
plaint of reduced admissions filed by 
the Genesee, Buffalo, against the 
Commodore, Roxy, Columbia, Colo- 
nial, Rialto and Ellen Terry ; a clear- 
ance and zoning complaint brought by 
the New Preston, Baltimore, against 
the Ritz, and appealed from the 
Washington board's ruling, and a re- 
duced admission complaint by the 
Kenton, Portland, against the Roxy. 
Decisions on all three were reserved. 

The Campi appeal committee meet- 
ing tomorrow will consist of Charles 
O'Reilly, chairman ; Charles Rosen* 
zweig and A. H. Schwartz. 

Two Loew Valencia 
Complaints Dropped 

Two clearance and zoning com- 
plaints against Loew's Valencia, Ja- 
maica, were withdrawn by the com- 
plainants yesterday just prior to their 
scheduled hearing before the local 
board. No reason for the withdraw- 
als was given. 

The complainants were the Regent 
and Bay Shore at Bay Shore, and the 
Patchogue, Granada and Rialto at 
Patchogue. Their protests were di- 
rected at the seven days' protection 
given the Valencia on Paramount, M- 
G-M and United Artists product. All 
other product plays Bay Shore and 
Patchogue seven days after New York 
first run. 



Coast Board Takes 
Stand on Lotteries 

Los Angeles, July 18. — Following 
several decisions against bank nights, 
the local grievance board has taken an 
emphatic stand against such practices 
on the ground that they constitute a 
rebate in the form of a lottery and 
tend to lower admission prices. 

It is also declared that they are un- 
fair competition and violate the in- 
dustry pledge to maintain the best 
standards of advertising and publicity. 



Fitzgerald on Code 

Richmond, July 18. — The procedure 
for filing and hearing complaints, 
grievances and protests before local 
code boards was explained to the M. 
P. T. O. of Virginia tonight by James 
B. Fitzgerald, secretary for the Wash- 
ington boards. 

Fitzgerald singled out six major 
portions of the code and outlined pro- 
cedures involved in filing and hearing 
cases under those sections. 



Cleveland Delaying 

Cleveland July 18. — The local 
grievance board has ruled no decisions 
will be released for publication until 
rulings have been signed by all board 
members and parties to the protest of- 
ficially notified. The reason is that on 
one occasion the board made a de- 
cision, announced it and subsequently 
changed its mind. 



Gets New Emblem 



U.S. 



CODE 



GRAPHIC ARTS INDUSTRY 



DICI5TRATION NO. 1 

The Code Authority of the 
periodical publishing and 
printing industry has issued 
to Quigley Publications an 
emblem symbolic of accept- 
ance of, and compliance with, 
the Graphic Arts Code. 

This emblem supersedes the 
Blue Eagle issued to Quigley 
Publications for compliance 
with the President's re-em- 
ployment agreement. It estab- 
lishes that Motion Picture 
Daily and the other Quigley 
publications are carrying out 
the hours and wage condi- 
tions of the code of the pub- 
lishing industry and that they 
are complying with the code 
of fair trade practices adopted 
by the industry. 

Important under the provi- 
sions for fair trade practice 
in the publishing code is a 
pledge of absolute editorial 
independence and a require- 
ment that advertising rates 
comply with the registered 
rate cards of publications. 



Trendle Complaint 
Goes Over 2 Weeks 

Detroit, July 18. — Hearing on 
George Trendle's complaint charging 
interference by Lew Wisper in the 
transfer of a neighborhood house has 
been postponed for two weeks by the 
grievance board. 

D. M. Robbins, Echo Theatre, has 
been authorized to continue advertis- 
ing on his screen and through mailed 
programs on product to be exhibited 
within the following seven days. The 
practice had been challenged by Al 
Lane, Alhambra ; Harold Munx, Tux- 
edo, and B. Nothworst, Regent. 



He Was Excused 

Los Angeles, July 18. — Robert Kil- 
leen, proprietor of the Rex in 
Phoenix, Ariz., was scheduled to ap- 
pear before the Los Angeles grievance 
board at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. He 
arrived at 4 o'clock and discovered 
because of his tardiness the case had 
been dismissed. He then told of how 
he had made the trip all the way from 
Phoenix and was riding around town 
in a taxi looking for the office. 

The excuse worked and now the 
board will give him another chance 
to present his complaint. 



Detroit Zoning Set Soon 

Detroit, July 18.— The new city wide 
zoning plan will be ready in a few 
days, according to E. S. Kinney, board 
secretary. A Grand Rapids schedule 
will follow shortly afterwards. 



"Marker" at 
$7,500 Hits 
Seattle Top 

Seattle, July 18. — "Little Miss 
Marker" took the lead here last week 
with $7,500 at the Fifth Avenue. An- 
other good draw was "The Life of 
Vergie Winters" at $7,000 in the 
Music Hall. 

"Little Miss Marker" will be given 
an extended run at the Coliseum and 
"The Life of Vergie Winters" will 
be held at the Music Hall. 

Total first run business was $29,- 
150. Average is $31,000. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 14: 

"SHE MADE HER BED" (Para.) 
"EMBARRASSING MOMENTS" (Univ.) 

BLUE MOUSE— (950), 15c-25c-35c, 7 
days. Gross: $2,850. (Average, $3,500) 
"LITTLE MISS MARKER" (Para.) 
FIFTH AVENUE— (2,450), 25c-40c-55c, 7 
days. Gross: $7,500. (Average, $7,000) 
"LETS TALK IT OVER" (S. R.) 
"TAMING THE JUNGLE" (S. R.) 
LIBERTY — (1,800), 10c-15c-25c, 7 days. 
Gross: $3,400. (Average, $4,000) 
"COCKEYED CAVALIERS" (Radio) 
MUSIC BOX— (950), 25c-40c-55c, 7 days. 
Gross: $3,200. (Average, $4,000) 
"LIFE OF VERGIE WINTERS" (Radio) 
MUSIC HALL— (2,275), 25c-40c-55c, 7 
days. Gross: $7,000. (Average, $6,500) 
"NOW I'LL TELL" (Fox) 
PARAMOUNT— (3,050), 25c-35c, 7 days. 
Vaudeville headed by Jeffrey Gill. Gross: 
$5,200. (Average, $6,000) 

New Companies Get 
3 St. Louis Houses 

(Continued from page 1) 

entering into a management arrange- 
ment with Fanchon & Marco. Harry 
C. Arthur of New York is expected 
to make St. Louis his headquarters to 
look after the five F. & M. theatres 
here. It is also rumored that F. & M. 
may acquire a number of other thea- 
tres in eastern Missouri and southern 
Illinois. 

In the meantime the Shubert oper- 
ated by Warners is being closed. The 
current report is that the actual clos- 
ing may be moved up, although the 
original announcement made July 24 
the dead line. Rumors persist that 
Warners are about to take over the 
Orpheum. 

The Mercantile-Commerce Bank & 
Trust Co. has filed a foreclosure suit 
asking sale of the Shubert-Rialto 
Theatre Building. As trustees under 
a $200,000 deed of trust against the 
property, the bank alleges that prin- 
cipal and interest pavments totaling 
about $50,000 are in default. 

Must Get First Run 
Showings — Johnston 

(Continued from paoe 1) 

Berkowitz, head of the Standard ex- 
change, Buffalo Monogram distributor. 
They were en route to Hollywood by 
motor. 

"Negative costs will be far higher 
than ever before," Johnston declared, 
"which means not only that we need 
first run dates, but that first run ex- 
hibitors will need our type of 
product." 



"U" to Star Baby Jane 

Hollywood, July 18. — Carl Laem- 
mle, Jr., plans to star Juanita Quig- 
ley, three-year-old find, within three 
months. He will also change her 
name to Baby Jane. She is now 
working in "Imitation of Life." 



"Bondage" Is 
Big Holdover 
At Music Hall 



"Of Human Bondage" maintained 
its strong pull in a second week at 
the Music Hall. The take was $73,- 
000. This made $167,500 for the two 
weeks, which is big business at this 
time of the year. 

Another holdover, "The Thin Man" 
at the Capitol, with Duke Ellington 
and his orchestra, was good for $24,- 
500. "Baby, Take a Bow" hit $30,000 
in its second week at the Roxy and 
was kept on for a third. 

Estimated takings : 

Week Ending July 10: 

"STRICTLY DYNAMITE" (Radio) 

RIALTO— (2,200), 25c-65c, 7 days. Gross: 

$9,000. 

Week Ending July 11: 

"OF HUMAN BONDAGE" (Radio) 

RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL— (5,945), 35c- 
$1,65, 2nd week, 7 days. Stage show. Gross: 
$73 000. 

Week Ending July 12: 
"THE THIN MAN" (M-G-M) 

CAPITOL— (4,700), 35c-$1.65, 2nd week. 7 
days. Stage: Duke Ellington and orchestra 
and Harlem revue. Gross: $24,500. 

"THE WORLD MOVES ON" (Fox) 
CRITERION— (875), 55c-$1.65, 3rd week, 7 
days. Gross: $5,400. 

"HELL CAT" (Col.) 
PALACE— (2,500), 25c-75c, 7 days. Vaude- 
ville. Gross: $15,000. 

"SHOOT THE WORKS" (Para.) 
PARAMOUNT — (3,700), 35c-99c, 7 days. 
Stage show. Gross: $26,800. 

"BABY, TAKE A BOW" (Para.) 
ROXY— (6,200), 25c-55c, 2nd week, 7 days. 
Stage show. Gross: $30,000. 
"MIDNIGHT ALIBI" (Warners)— 6 days 
"MAN WITH TWO FACES" (Wamers)- 
1 day 

STRAND — (2,000), 25c-$1.10, 7 days. Gross: 

$9,700. 

Week Ending July 16: 
"CALL IT LUCK" (Fox) 

MAYFAIR— (2,300), 35c-85c, 7 days. Gross: 

$3,150. 



"Gentleman," Band 
Lead in Portland 

Portland, July 18. — In spite of the 
continued waterfront strike and the 
prospect of a general strike "Affairs 
of a Gentleman," with Ted Fiorita and 
his band on the Hamrick Music Box 
stage, more than doubled its normal 
take at $6,900. 

"House of Rothschild," brought back 
for a return engagement at Hamrick's 
Oriental, topped par $700 for a total 
of $2,700. "Viva Villa" was slightlv 
off at $4,800 at United Artists and 
"Shoot the Works" and "The Great 
Flirtation" also failed to hit par at 
the Paramount 

Total first run business was $24,700. 
Average is $22,000. 

Estimated takings for the week end- 
ing July 11 : 

"CIRCUS CLOWN" (F. N.) 
"I GIVE MY LOVE" (Univ.) 

BROADWAY— (1,912), 25c-35c-40c, 7 days. 
Gross: $3,900. (Average, $5,000) 
"AFFAIRS OF A GENTLEMAN" (Univ.) 

HAMRICK'S MUSIC BOX— (2,000), 25c- 
35c-40c, 7 days. Stage: Ted Fiorita and 
band. Gross: $6,900. (Average. $3,000) 

"HOUSE OF ROTHSCHILD" (U. A.) 

HAMRICK'S ORIENTAL— (2,040), 25c, 7 
davs. Gross: $2,700. (Average. $2,000) 
"MONEY MEANS NOTHING" (Mono.) 

PANTAGES— (1.700), 15c-25c, 7 days. 
Stage show. Gross: $1,600. (Average, $2,000) 

"SHOOT THE WORKS" (Para.) 
"THE GREAT FLIRTATION" (Para.) 

PARAMOUNT— (3,008), 25c-35c-40c, 7 
days. Gross: $4,800. (Average. $5,000) 
"VIVA VILLA" (M-G-M) 

UNITED ARTISTS — (945) , 25c-35c-40c, 7 
days. Gross: $4,800. (Average, $5,000) 




Picture 
Industry 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Alert, 
Intelligent 
and • * 
Faithful 
Service to 
the Industry 
in All 
Branches 



VOL. 36. NO. 16 



NEW YORK, FRIDAY, JULY 20, 1934 



TEN CENTS 



Unplayed 40 
RKO 'Ace' In 
Circuit Race 



With 110 Bought, Chain 
Nears Requirement 



Approximately 40 pictures, bought 
at the outset of the 1933-34 season 
but unplayed to date, give the RKO 
circuit a hitherto unsuspected ace in 
the hole and, with 1934-35 product 
already signed, furnish virtually all 
the product required to keep going 
in this territory, according to sources 
familiar with inside workings in the 
RKO camp. 

The unplayed pictures, it is under- 
stood, come from all sources signed 
last season and include not only Radio 
Pictures, but others from Paramount, 
Warner, Universal and Columbia. 
With 50 due from Radio next season, 
30 from Paramount and 30 from 
Warners, RKO officials are known to 
regard their position as secure, despite 
the fact additional product will have 
to be annexed to meet double feature 
policies prevalent in many of the cir- 
cuit's houses. 

They, therefore, view any conclu- 
sion that the circuit will be shy of 
pictures as untrue and unfounded. 



RKO-Consolidated 
Dicker Over Notes 

Negotiations for extension of the 
maturities on $1,800,000 of RKO gold 
notes, secured by virtually all of the 
RKO investments in its subsidiary 
companies, are under way with Con- 
solidated Film Industries, it was 
learned yesterday. 

The notes mature in the principal 

(Continued on page 8) 



New Finance Setup 
For Pathe Outlined 

A proposal to reorganize the finan- 
cial setup of Pathe Exchanges, Inc., 
has been tentatively approved by the 
board of directors, it is understood. 

(Continued on page 8) 



Levy on Admissions 
Proposed by Mayor 

A three to five per cent tax on 
theatre admissions, it was revealed 
yesterday, has been added to Mayor 
LaGuardia's tentative revenue pro- 
gram for raising funds for the city's 
emergency relief. 



Finds Stars Worth B.O. 
Pull; No Federal Check 



$4,000,000 Offer for Fox 
Metropolitan Bonds Is Set 



An alternate bid of approximately 
$4,000,000 for the Fox Metropolitan 
bonds deposited with the bondholders' 
committee was completed yesterday by 
Loew's and Warners and the prospect 
of its acceptance by the committee is 
viewed optimistically by the bidders, 
it was stated last night. 



The new bid will be submitted to 
Federal Judge Julian W. Mack in 
U. S. District Court here today. It 
was at the virtual insistence of Judge 
Mack on July 12 that Loew's and 
Warners prepared the bid for the Fox 
Met bonds, their previous bid of $4,- 
500,000 for the assets of the circuit, 

(Continued on page 6) 



"U" Reports 
Big Jump to 
Profit Side 



Universal Pictures Co., Inc., and its 
subsidiaries, report a net profit of 
$31,001.27 for the six months ending 
April 28. This is a striking reversal 
of conditions which prevailed at the 
end of the same six-month period in 
1933. 

The net gain is currently $633,- 
256.68, as the company reported a loss 
of $602,255.41 for the same period a 
year ago. 

The profit was reported after all 

(Continued on page 8) 



Paramount Will Get 
"Cleopatra" First 

"Cleopatraf will play the Para- 
mount and not the Criterion where 
original plans called for a two-a-day 
run at advanced prices as part of a 
plan to swing bigger Paramount at- 
tractions into the weekly change the- 
atre in order to bolster its trade. 

Currently, with "The Old-Fash- 
ioned Way," the Paramount is ex- 
pected to do under $20,000 for the 
week which terminated last night. 

Para. Trustees Get 
Additional Counsel 

Paramount Publix trustees were au- 
thorized yesterday by Federal Judge 
Alfred C. Coxe to retain Root, Clark, 
Buckner & Ballantine as counsel in the 
reorganization proceedings under the 

(Continued on page 8) 



Actor- Writer 
Guilds Work 
On Radio Deal 



Hollywood, July 19. — In spite of 
exhibitor complaints and the intent of 
studios to keep players from the air 
when possible, a move has been started 
jointly by the Screen Writers' Guild 
and the Screen Actors' Guild to line 
up sketches and talent for a series 
of broadcasts from Sept. 1 to Dec. 
31. 

The idea is to have the writer do 
the sketches and the players donate 
their services, so that whatever funds 

(Continued on page 6) 



Ohioans Talk Over 
New Season Selling 

Cincinnati, July 19. — Selling poli- 
cies of the various companies, and the 
matter of cancellation of pictures con- 
sidered objectionable by the Legion of 
Decency were two subjects discussed 
at a closed meeting of the Ohio Val- 
ley Independent Exhibitors' League 
yesterday. 

A meeting is set for tomorrow for 
a preliminary discussion of operators' 
contracts for next season. 



Frisco Theatres to 
Reopen on Saturday 

San Francisco, July 19.— With the 
general strike here having collapsed, 
local houses will reopen their doors 
at one o'clock Saturday afternoon, it 
was learned today, the fourth day of 

(Continued on page 8) 



Report Holds Curb on 
Salaries, Star Raids 
Hard to Enforce 



Washington, July 19. — Declaring 
the worth of a star to be gauged by 
what the public will pay to see him, 
Division Administrator Sol A. Rosen- 
blatt today made public the long- 
awaited report on salaries, in which 
the code provisions dealing with ex- 
cessive remuneration were held to be 
incapable of effective administration 
and their continued indefinite suspen- 
sion recommended. 

The report also recommended in- 
definite continuance of the suspension 
of the provisions on star raiding as 
not contemplated under the terms of 
the Industrial Recovery Act and, like 
the salary provisions, incapable of ef- 
fective enforcement. 

To deal further with the problems 
involved, Rosenblatt recommends the 
creation of a committee, either with 
or without government participation, 
to study and report on "a method for 
compensating those engaged in artistic, 
creative, interpretative, directorial, 
technical and supervisory capacities on 
the basis of a minimum guaranteed 
compensation against a percentage of 

(Continued on page 6) 



Denver Defi Goes 
Up to Rosenblatt 

The manifesto repudiating Code Au- 
thority and its local boards which 
was signed by 36 of 40 exhibitors in 
the Denver metropolitan area has been 
forwarded to Division Administrator 
Sol A. Rosenblatt at Washington 
by Campi headquarters here, it was 
learned yesterday. 

It was stated at Campi that the 
Denver defi is regarded as being in 

(Continued on page 6) 



Campi Audit Shows 
Economy, Is Report 

A Price, Waterhouse audit of Code 
Authority administration costs was 
completed yesterday showing a "re- 
markably economical operation" of 
code machinery, according to a Campi 
spokesman. The audit will be sub- 
mitted to Campi at its next meeting, 
July 26, before being made public. 

Four appeals from rulings of the 
Atlanta grievance board were heard 

(Continued on page 6) 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Friday, July 20, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 

(Registered U. S. Patent Office) 



Insiders' Outlook 



Vol. 36 



July 20, 1934 



No. 16 




Martin Quigley 
Editor-Chief and Publisher 
MAURICE KANN JjfjB 

Editor 
JAMES A. CRON 
Advertising Manager 



Published daily except Sunday and holi- 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub- 
sidiary of Quigley Publications, Inc., 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 1790 Broadway, New 
York. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Cable ad- 
dress "Quigpubco, New York." All con- 
tents copyrighted 1934 by Motion Picture 
Daily, Inc. Address all correspondence to 
the New York Office. Other Quigley pub- 
lications: MOTION PICTURE HERALD 
BETTER THEATRES, THE MOTION 
PICTURE ALMANAC and THE CHI- 
CAGOAN. „ , TT . T ., 

Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Life 
Building, Vine and Yucca Streets, Victor 
M Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 407 
South Dearborn Street, Edwin S. Clif- 
ford Manager; London Bureau: Remo 
House, 310 Regent St., London, W. 1, 
Bruce Allan, Representative. Cable address: 
"Quigpubco, London"; Berlin Bureau: 
Berlin - Terapelhof , Kaiserin - Augustastrasse 
28, Joachim K. Rutenberg, Representative; 
Paris Bureau: 19, Rue de la . Cour-des- 
Noues, Pierre Autre, Representative; Rome 
Bureau: Viale Gorizia, Vittorio Malpassuti, 
Representative; Sydney Bureau, 102 Sus- 
sex Street, Cliff Holt, Representative; Mex- 
ico City Bureau: Apartado 269, James 
Lockhart. Representative; Glascow Bureau: 
86 Dundrennan Road, G. Holmes, Kept z- 
sentative; Budapest Bureau: 3, Kaplar-u, 
Budapest, II, Endre Hevesi, Representa- 

tlV Entered as second class matter, January 
4 1926 at the Post Office at New York 
City, N. Y., under Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada $15 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 



"Cavalcade" Going 
Into the Criterion 

"Cavalcade" returns to Broadway 
Monday on a grind policy at the Cri- 
terion. Admissions will range from 
25 to 40 cents. 

"The World Moves On," current 
two-a-day Fox attraction there, will 
fold Sunday evening after four weeks 
and three days. 

Claim New Leader Patent 

Walgot Trailer Service, Inc., says 
it has received a patent for a new 
frame line leader which replaces the 
old style photographically printed 
leader. Advantages claimed for it are 
clearance for sound track on both sides 
and perfect opaqueness. 

Theresa Helburn Signed 

Hollywood, July 19. — Theresa Hel 
burn, executive director of the New 
York Theatre Guild, has been signed 
bv Harry Cohn to produce, direct and 
supervise for Columbia. 

Frankwyn to Move 

Frankwyn Company — Harold B. 
Franklin and Arch Selwyn — will 
move shortly from the NBC Bldg. 
to the Empire Trust Bldg. and twice 
its present floor space. 

Will Show French Film 

"L'Abbe Constantin," a French pic- 
ture directed by J. P. Paulin, will be 
shown tonight on the Paris at Pier 57 
by John S. Tapernoux. 



THE other side of the story- 
came into the open yester- 
day. The RKO circuit's ace in 
the picture hole proves to be 
about 40 films on this season's 
programs which have not been 
played. From its own affiliate, 
Radio Pictures, as well as Fox, 
Universal, Columbia and War- 
ners are they drawn. Unplayed 
this season, they now go over to 
the new, thereby swelling the cir- 
cuit's availabilities to 150. Most 
of RKO's houses change twice 
weekly. Some of them use 
doubles. Others, further down 
the line, change three times a 
week, placing their requirements 
roughly at 156. It may be neces- 
sary to pick up a few independ- 
ents to fill in. RKO says there's 
nothing tough about it. Unde- 
termined still, moreover, is Fox, 
although yesterday the report 
was about that Sidney Kent had 
reached an understanding with 
Nick Schenck on that score. . . . 
T 

Here is how the battle lines 
between Greater New York's two 
ace circuits are drawn on the 
front that counts most: pictures. 

Loevrfs 

M-G-M 50 

Paramount 30 

Warners 30 

Universal 36 

United Artists 21 

Columbia 36 

Total 203 

RKO 

Radio 50 

Paramount 30 

Warners 30 

Holdovers 40 

Total 150 

T 

Says an RKO adherent : 
"There are only 52 Saturdays 
and Sundays in any man's show 
business every year. I under- 



stand Loew is committed to give 
Metro 20; Paramount, 15; War- 
ner, 10; United Artists, 10. 
That's 55 already with no time 
allowed in this reckoning for 
Universal and Columbia. The 
dope I get is that Loew has 63 
week-ends to take care of and 
"only 52 to do it in. So what? 
So, you figure it out." What 
this source, however, failed to in- 
clude is creation of new first 
runs drawn from the Fox Met 
houses to be acquired, if they 
are acquired. The Loew attitude 
is that, if RKO plans to create 
new first runs where they don't 
exist now, the former can do the 
same thing. That sounds rea- 
sonable enough. . . . 

T 

Whispers, made purposely 
vague but permitted to get about 
in sources close to RKO, tie in 
the name of Ed Flynn, Demo- 
cratic leader in the Bronx. He 
is a director of Keith-Albee-Or- 
pheum. He is close to Jim Far- 
ley, an important figure in the 
Administration. There's Mike 
Meehan, stock market operator, 
too. He's in control of K-A-O, 
although some say he wishes 
otherwise. On what it all may 
portend, any listener is permitted 
to draw his own conclusions. 
But now you have it, to throw 
out or retain as you may be 
minded. Two certain factors 
loom in the local situation: (1) 
The battle between RKO and 
Loew is on. It will be a real one. 
(2) RKO is after plenty of the- 
atres in this sector. It won't 
buy because it hasn't the money. 
It will operate and book because 
that doesn't call for any money. 



Mexico leads to old France. 
Meaning that it is "La Cucara- 
cha," special short, which decided 
Radio to proceed with "Three 
Musketeers" in Technicolor's new 



Many Off on Big Board 



three-component process. Dumas' 
adventure tale of swashbuckling 
when knights were bold lends it- 
self to color. The deciding short 
is a beautiful subject, handled by 
Lloyd Corrigan, its director, to 
exact full advantage of the strik- 
ing color photography which is 
its outstanding feature. Just as 
Pioneer Pictures, headed by 
"Jock" Whitney, made "La 
Cucaracha," so will be "The 
Three Musketeers." Pioneer and 
Radio will go fifty-fifty on the 
negative. . . . 

T 

Outstanding "nut" item of the 
entire church campaign, beyond 
doubt, goes to a man named 
Alvin C. Hause. He is a Baptist, 
does his preaching at the Bales 
Baptist Church, Kansas City, and 
blames the mid-western drought 
on divine displeasure drummed 
up by "filth in our movie the- 
atres." If he were occupying a 
San Francisco pulpit, no doubt 
the cause of the late strike would 
be ditto. . . . Presence of those 
Paramount theatre partners in 
town continues to be described 
as either "routine" or "they just 
happen to be here." Less diplo- 
matic voices, however, insist 
something's up. . . . Friends are 
thinking of renaming "His 
Greatest Gamble," now holding 
forth at the Rialto, to "Mayer's 
Greatest Gamble." . . . 

KANN 



High Low Close 

Columbia Pictures, vtc 29 29 29 

Consolidated Film Industries 3 2% VA 

Consolidated Film Industries, pfd 13 12 13 

Eastman Kodak 10054 100 10034 

Fox Film "A" 12 1154 12 

Loew's, Inc 2854 27 27 

Paramount Publix, cts 354 354 354 

Pathe Exchange VA VA VA 

Pathe Exchange "A" 1956 18 1856 

RKO 2 \% 2 

Warner Bros 45i 3J6 4 

Technicolor Up % on Curb 



Net 

Change 

+ h 

- 54 

+i 

- 54 

+ 54 
-54 

- a 



—i 



Net 



Sales 

100 
100 
1,200 
500 
600 
1.800 
3,500 
300 
1,100 
1,400 
19,200 



Sentry Safety Control 54 

Technicolor 1454 



High Low Close Change Sales 



54 
1354 



54 
1454 



+ % 



600 
3,700 



RKO Bonds Slump 4 Points 



Loew's 6s '41, ww deb right: 
Paramount Broadway 554s ' 

Paramount F. L. 6s '47 

Paramount Publix 554s '50. 

RKO 6s '41, pp 

Warner Bros. 6s '39, wd 



Parent-Teachers Hit 
Duals on the Coast 

San Francisco, July 19. — Hulda 
McGinn, manager of the California 
Theatre Ass'n., has received word 
from the California Congress of Par- 
ent-Teacher Ass'ns, Inc., urging the- 
atres to abandon double bills and to 
establish family nights. 

The organization has 150,000 mem- 
bers in the state, it is said. 



Warners Fete Farley 

Hollywood, July 19. — Postmaster 
General Farley was honored today at 
a luncheon at the Warner studio, at 
which he told a gathering of notables 
of screen, politics and society that the 
industry will keep up with the times 
and respond to the public taste in film 
entertainment. Farley was eulogized 
by Will Hays. The affair was ar- 
ranged by Al Cohn. 



Shirley Temple Wins 

Hollywood, July 19. — The parents 
of Shirley Temple have settled theii 
dispute over the salary of the child 
star and have signed a new contract 
for her. Fox is reported to have met 
their demand for $2,500 a week. 



Rogers Has 5 Set 

Charles R. Rogers, in New York 
from the Coast on a vacation, said 
yesterday he has set five of his planned 
10 for Paramount next season. He 
will be here a week. 









Net 




High 


Low 


Close 


Change 


Sales 


. 10154 


101 


10154 


+ 54 


8 


40 


40 


40 




5 


. 46 


4554 


4554 


- 54 


5 


47 


47 


47 


+ 54 


2 


25 


25 


25 


—4 


1 


53 


50 


5154 


-154 


101 



Ennis on Para. Shorts 

Bert Ennis is writing scripts for 
several of the Paramount shorts series 
made in the east under general super- 
vision of Tom Waller. 



HE'S HERE 

with the picture 
that will 



SHOW 
BUSINESS 



every- 
thing 

these 

in 

Cats Paw 

with 

UNA MERKEL 
GEORGE BARBIER 

NAT PENDLETON 
GRACE BRADLEY 
ALAN DINEHART 
GRANT MITCHELL 

Directed by 

SAM TAYLOR 




From the Saturday Evening Post Story 
by CLARENCE BUDINGTON KELLAND 

Produced by the 
HAROLD LLOYD CORPORATION 
a FOX release 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Friday, July 20, 1924 



Finds Talent 
Is Worth Pull 
At Box-Off ice 



(Continued from page 1) 
the receipts of the respective pictures 
upon which they may be engaged" ; 
also to make recommendations for a 
uniform production cost formula, uni- 
form production report system, uni- 
form budget schedule and uniform 
salary ranges for various classes of 
employment. 

The commission also is to consider 
whether it would be desirable and 
practical to establish a permanent com- 
mission, representative of producers 
and the various classes of employes, 
with power to require all proposed of- 
fers of employment to be transmitted 
for approval in advance of consumma- 
tion, report in full on all negotiations 
for employment, provide for regula- 
tion of salaries "in proper cases," di- 
rect that services of employes not util- 
ized by the employer may be available 
"upon such equitable terms and condi- 
tions as the commission may pre- 
scribe" to other producers and to 
make findings and report to producers 
concerned when in the commission's 
opinion corporate assets have been 
wasted by production executives in 
their employment of any members of 
the foregoing classes of employes. 

Little Reduction in Costs 

Criticizing the producers for failing 
to "clean house," Rosenblatt declared 
enforced readjustments, particularly 
during the past year, have had a salu- 
tary effect upon the financial structure 
of the exhibition division, "but no con- 
vincing evidence exists to indicate that 
basic production costs have been great- 
ly reduced, or that any substantial 
progress has been made toward the 
elimination of those practices preva- 
lent within the industry which tend 
to depress the quality of motion pic- 
ture entertainment offered to the con- 
suming public." 

"One general indication of the con- 
tribution which <-- 1 -"-v payments make 
to the maladjustment of production 
costs is found in the failure of man- 
agement to adjust salary ranges of 
executives or artists to changed earn- 
ing capacity of the various companies 
in the industry," he continued. 

"The intangibles of human talent, 
not celluloid," constitute the basic in- 
gredient of the entertainment service 
offered to the consuming public, Ro- 
senblatt held. "Here, as in no other 
artistic field, the talents of unique 
personalities have, through the organi- 
zation and sales ingenuity of the in- 
dustry, been brought before vast audi- 
ences in every part of the world," he 
said. 

To a limited degree the factors which 
control the value of artists and direc- 
tors apply also to production execu- 
tives, Rosenblatt asserted. 

"Thus, the mere fact that unusual 
creative talent, unique in some cases, 
constitutes the bone and marrow of 
the motion picture indusiry offers a 
natural explanation for the compara- 
tively high compensation which is of- 
fered by the industry for these serv- 
ices," the report explained, but "under 
the normal operation of economic 
forces, the compensation commanded 
bv these talents is in the long run de- 



$4,000,000 Offer for Fox 
Metropolitan Bonds Is Set 



(Continued 

its 87 leaseholds and fee properties, 
having been looked upon with dis- 
pleasure by the court. The $4,500,- 
000 bid remains as an alternate offer 
for the bondholders' committee to con- 
sider, but in view of the court's atti- 
tude expressed at the last hearing its 
acceptability is regarded as highly 
dubious. 

Though Judge Mack is known to 
desire final settlement of the Loew- 
Warner bidding for the circuit at to- 
day's hearing, it is believed that if the 
bondholders' committee requests addi- 
tional time to consider the new alter- 
nate bid, the court would entertain a 
further adjournment rather than go 



from page 1) 

counter to the committee's wishes. 
Final disposition of the circuit today, 
therefore, is still in some doubt. 

The bondholders are known to favor 
a bid for their bonds rather than for 
the circuit's assets, which have been 
the subject of the bidding up to today. 
If the committee accepts the $4,000,000 
offer for the bonds, Loew's and War- 
ners would then be in a position to 
proceed with their own reorganization 
of the circuit. The bidding for the 
assets contemplated partial reorgani- 
zation by the bondholders' committee 
with Loew's and Warners then ac- 
quiring the leaseholds and fee proper- 
ties from the committee. 



termined by the appeal which they 
make to the consuming public. An 
artist may have a talent of infinite and 
lasting value to offer to the world, but 
from a strictly commercial standpoint 
that talent is worth onlv as much as 
it can earn for the producer in box- 
office receipts." 

No salary is too high if the picture 
meets with unusual public favor as a 
result of unique direction or artistry, 
it was declared. 

Nevertheless, Rosenblatt concluded, 
"the fact remains that all available evi- 
dence indicates that primary gross 
salary ranges in the industry have 
gone beyond any rational standard of 
compensation, based upon a percent- 
age of the receipts representing the 
contribution to the picture." The 
basic reasons for the failure in the 
adjustment of salaries are to be found 
in trade practices, jealousy, ambition 
and other destructive factors, accord- 
ing to the report. Two of these prac- 
tices are the star system "exploited in 
such manner that the values created 
by the producers are turned against 
them by the necessity for paying ex- 
cessive salaries, and unfair competitive 
bidding for talent," it added. 

No Dope on Nepotism 

Lengthy tables, were appended to 
the report developing the various 
phases of the inquiry. No information 
was given with respect to nepotism 
because of failure to secure consistent 
or complete data. Seventy-seven sep- 
arate organizations were covered by 
the survey, including the nine largest 
producers. Compensation figures for 
3,846 persons, whose compensation last 
year ranged from $100 up, were given. 

The greatest remuneration reported 
for any individual in producing-dis- 
tributing companies was $315,000 paid 
an actor for one picture, which con- 
stituted his year's work, this repre- 
senting 1.725 per cent of his com- 
pany's total payroll and 1.74 per cent 
of its gross receipts. The next high- 
est paid artist received $10,000 per 
week but only $296,250 for the year, 
which represented 2.373 per cent of the 
company's total payroll and .973 per 
cent of its gross receipts. The high- 
est paid executive received a salary of 
$2,112.50 per week, and for the year 
received $104,000 in salary and $169,- 
596.29 other compensation, a total of 
$273,596.29. The highest paid general 
manager received $103,025 in salary 
and $169,596.29 other compensation, a 
total of $272,621.29. 

The highest paid counsel received 
$179,599.79 for the year, while the 



highest paid director received only 
$150,000. 

Sixty-two persons were shown to 
have received more than $100,000 for 
the year, and 102 others received be- 
tween $50,000 and $100,000, the high- 
est paid writer coming within this 
group with a compensation of $93,541.- 
66, the highest paid studio manager 
with $57,183.34, and the highest paid 
composer with $52,416.66. The best 
paid supervisor received $48,500; the 
top camera manager $46,000 and the 
top sales manager $43,200. 

Seven hundred eighty-two persons 
received $12,000 or more for the year, 
while 923 made less than $2,000. 

The highest salary paid by a pro- 
ducing company was $150,000 paid an 
actor for one picture, representing 
10.55 per cent of the total payroll and 
5.835 per cent of gross receipts. Only 
four persons, including one executive, 
received more than $100,000. 

The top figure reported by distribut- 
ing companies was $90,774.68 paid a 
vice-president, who, with a president 
receiving $86,625, was the only per- 
son to receive as much as $25,000. The 
top in exhibition companies was $94,- 
760.20 to a president, only four per- 
sons receiving more than $50,000. 

Seventeen individuals received com- 
pensation from two or more depart- 
ments in the same company, the top 
figure being $126,610.29. 

A composite balance sheet of all the 
companies surveyed — producing, dis- 
tribution and exhibition — employing a 
total of 316,176 persons, including 220,- 
945 extras, showed that executives re- 
ceived 2.03 per cent of gross receipts ; 
supervisors, 2.64 ; actors, 6.82 ; extras, 
.45; directors, 1.54; musical directors 
and musicians, 1.36; sound engineers, 
.16; sound technicians, .24; camera- 
men, .49; studio mechanics, 1.68, and 
laboratory workers, .45. 



Rosenblatt in Coast 
Confab Next Week 

Washington, July 19. — Problems 
of the industry will be discussed with 
Hollywood leaders next week by Sol 
A. Rosenblatt, division administrator, 
who will leave Washington Monday 
for a two-weeks' trip. While in Cali- 
fornia, Rosenblatt is expected to dis- 
cuss agency, actor-producer, writer- 
producer, extra and studio labor com- 
mittees. 

Refusing to state definitely whether 
his trip is based on any concrete diffi- 
culty which has arisen, Rosenblatt to- 
day said it would be taken in the in- 
terest of all the codes under his care. 



Actor- Writer 
Guilds Work 
On Radio Deal 



(Continued from page 1) 

are derived from sale of the program^ 
to advertisers can be turned over to 
the guilds. 

In a form letter now being sent out 
to guild members they are told that 
the sketches will run about 25 min- 
utes each and they are asked to sign 
an agreement to work in the sketches 
without compensation. The letter states 
that an agreement has been reached 
between the guilds for a division oi 
the profits between the organizations 



Denver Defi Goes 
Up to Rosenblatt 

(Continued from pane 1) 

contempt of Federal law as embod- 
ied in the National Industrial Re 
covery Act, rather than of Code Au 
thority and the film code. No actior 
will be taken by Campi on the mani 
festo nor reply made to it until after 
the next meeting of Code Authority 
July 26, at which time recommenda- 
tions in the matter are expected to be 
made by Rosenblatt. 

The Denver exhibitors' manifesto 
declared in defiant terms that the 3( 
signatories would refuse to recognize 
Campi and the Denver grievance anc 
clearance and zoning boards until re- 
visions giving the complaining ex- 
hibitors "home rule in exhibition af- 
fairs" had been made. The actioi 
was taken, it was reported, when sev- 
eral theatres were ordered to enc 
lotteries while the grievance boarc 
failed to halt the weekly giving awa> 
of an automobile by houses operatec 
by Harry Huffman in Denver. The 
complaint against Huffman was dis 
missed for want of evidence when ex 
hibitor witnesses at the hearing de 
clined to testify. 



Campi Audit Shows 
Economy, Is Report 

(Continued from page 1) 

yesterday by a Campi appeal com 
mittee consisting of Charles L 
O'Reilly, chairman; Charles Ro 
senzweig and William Yoost. Th 
cases heard were Walter L. Branden 
burg vs. Lam Amusement Co., oi 
overbuying ; Lam Amusement Co. an( 
Fred Jabley vs. Walter Brandenburg 
on reduced admissions ; H. G- J en 
kins, South Pittsburg, Tenn., vs. Cum 
berland Amusement Co., Tallahoma 
Tenn., on reduced admissions, and th' 
Palace, Key West, Fla., vs. Strand 
Key West, on overbuying. 



L. A. Protests Failing 

Los Angeles, July 19. — Only on 
protest out of five has been upheld b; 
the clearance and zoning board thu 
far during hearings on the new clear 
ance schedule. A general meeting o 
zoning has been called for Wednesda 
by the clearance board. 



Fred Jack in Town 

Fred Jack, southwestern distric 
manager for Warners, is in Ne\ 
York conferencing with Gradwell I 
Sears. 



IN THESE 

CHANCING 

TIMES 



Names, facts and figures continue 
to make vivid, dramatic motion 
picture history. 

Each year new people, new policies, 
new technique cast their shadows 
across the box offices of the country. 

And all the world's exhibitors look 
annually to the Motion Picture 
Almanac* for guidance— for a sum- 

*1934-35 issue now on the press . 



mation and a prediction of these 
changing times. 

The biographical section alone is a 
big parade of 10,000 names march- 
ing across 422 solid pages of black 
type... countless other items account 
for the world-wide reputation of 
the Almanac as the industry's 
supreme reference authority. 

$5.00 



MOTION PICTURE ALMANAC 

1790 BROADWAY NEW YORK CITY 



8 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Friday, July 20, 1934 



RKO-Consolidated 
Dicker Over Notes 

(Continued from page 1) 

amount of $300,000 each on the first 
of August and the first of each month 
thereafter up to and including next 
January. Arrangements are being 
made to pay the August 1 maturity, 
pending the negotiations for exten- 
sions of maturities on the subsequent 
notes, which will then aggregate $1,- 
500,000. A $25,208 interest payment 
on the notes was met by RKO on 
July 1. 

The negotiations, it is understood, 
seek a six months' extension of the 
maturities of each of the five $300,000 
notes remaining after the Aug. 1 
payment. 

Consolidated acquired the notes 
from Chemical Bank & Trust Co. and 
Commercial Investment Trust last 
month. Attorneys for the RKO re- 
ceiver told the U. S. District Court 
here last spring that a foreclosure on 
the notes could "put RKO out of 
business as a going concern." 

Para. Trustees Get 
Additional Counsel 

(Continued from page 1) 

new bankruptcy laws and, in addi- 
tion, to retain special counsel for other 
legal work here and in Chicago, Los 
Angeles and other cities. 

Law firms being retained as spe- 
cial counsel are Cravath, de Gers- 
dorff, Swaine & Wood, former special 
counsel for Paramount and counsel 
for Kuhn, Loeb & Co., which is prom- 
inent in Paramount reorganization af- 
fairs ; Sonnenschein, Berkson, Laut- 
mann, Levinson & Morse, Chicago, 
attorneys for B. & K. ; Kiddle, Mar- 
geson & Hornidge; Rosen, Kammer, 
Wolff & Farrar; Cobb, Hoke, Ben- 
son, Krause & Faegre; Strauss & 
Hedges; Pillsbury, Madison & Sutro, 
and Choate, Hall & Stewart. 

Hearing Is Held on 
Leasing Complaint 

A lease negotiation complaint 
brought by the Luxor against Duray 
Realty Corp. and Luxor-Bleecker 
Amusement Corp. was heard by the 
local grievance board and certified to 
Code Authority yesterday for dispo- 
sition. 

Murtha Dixon, the complainant and 
present operator of the Luxor, charges 
in the complaint that Duray Realty 
Corp. entered into negotiations with 
the Luxor-Bleecker Amusement Corp. 
for leasing the Luxor to the latter 
without serving a dispossess notice on 
the present operator. 

The next meeting of the grievance 
board has been set for July 31. 

Flash Reviews 

Servants' Entrance — . . . spells en- 
tertainment with wide audience ap- 
peal. . . . 



Smoking Guns — . . . so-so western. 



These films will be reviewed in full in a 
later issue of Motion Picture Daily. 



Johnsons Reach Cairo 

Cairo, Egypt, July 19. — Mr. and 
Mrs. Martin Johnson arrived here yes- 
terday en route to London. They 
have just finished another big game 
picture. Mrs. Johnson is undergoing 
treatment for a jungle ailment. 



Attitude of Writers 
On Code Is Awaited 

Hollywood, July 19. — Production 
circles are awaiting the reaction of 
writers generally to the action of pro- 
ducers in reaffirming their recognition 
of the principles of the Academy's 
writer-producer code. 

This is regarded as a tactful way of 
informing the Writers' Guild that its 
efforts to frame a new code are not 
looked upon with favor. 

Producers have pledged more con- 
scientious enforcement of the Academy 
code. Writers will be benefited by a 
clarification of the method by which 
writers themselves can determine 
screen credits and by the establish- 
ment of an official bulletin of author- 
ship records. 

Spokesmen for the Academy say the 
code doesn't pretend to solve all 
writer-producer problems, but does 
represent the only successful negotia- 
tion in this field to date. 

Freedom Ass f n. Has 
Big Turnout Planned 

More than 1,000 people are expected 
at a meeting to be held by the newly 
formed Association for the Preserva- 
tion of the Freedom of the Stage and 
Screen at the Hotel New Yorker 
Monday evening at 8:30, according to 
I. Robert Broder, spokesman for the 
organization. Many prominent per- 
sons have been invited to speak. Dr. 
Charles Francis Potter of the First 
Humanist Society will speak and will 
also conduct an open forum. 

The organization, formed July 12, 
claims 40,000 members, 35,000 of 
whom are also members of the Inter- 
collegiate Democratic League of 
N. Y. 

This is the first step in opposition 
to the campaign being waged against 
films by the churches to be taken by 
a group not directly connected with 
producers or exhibitors. 



Defer Mason Broadcast 

The radio talk on the church de- 
cency campaign against films which 
was to have been given on WOR to- 
night by Lowell B. Mason, former 
counsel for the NRA Review Board, 
is being deferred until next week. 



11 More Features Passed 

Hollywood, July 19. — Joseph I. 
Breen has added 11 features and 11 
shorts to the list of films certified by 
him. Features are "The Man with 
Two Faces," "Dames," "The Dragon 
Murder Case" (Warners) ; "Affairs 
of Cellini," "Bulldog Drummond 
Strikes Back," "The Last Gentleman" 
(20th Century) ; "The Girl from Mis 
souri," (M-G-M) ; "Ransom— $1,- 
000,000" (Universal) ; "Name the 
Woman" (Columbia) ; "Now and 
Forever" (Paramount) ; "Servants' 
Entrance" (Fox). 



Grauman to Open Chinese 

Hollywood, July 19. — Sid Grauman 
is planning on reopening the Chinese 
early in August. He is considering one 
of three for the opener — "The World 
Moves On," "Barretts of Wimpole 
Street" or "Cleopatra." 



24 Join Writers' Guild 

Hollywood, July 19. — Twenty-four 
members of the Song Writers' Pro- 
tective Ass'n., including Sigmund 
Romberg, have joined the Screen 
Writers' Guild. 



Virginia MPTO May 
Go Into the MPTO A 



Richmond, July 19. — Affiliation of 
the recently formed M. P. T. O. of 
Virginia with the M. P. T. O. A. is 
expected shortly. About 150 exhibi- 
tors have joined to date. 

Officers elected last night are: 
President, Morton G. Thalhimer ; vice- 
presidents, Hunter Perry, Charlottes- 
ville; William S. Wilder, Norfolk; 
I. Weinberg, Lexington; Richard C. 
Overby, South Boston ; Sidney Gates, 
Portsmouth, and Ben Pitts, Freder- 
icksburg ; secretary, Elmer H. Brient, 
Richmond; treasurer, Sam Bendheim, 
Jr., Richmond ; directors, W. Harmon 
Reed, Alexandria ; Frederick W. Twy- 
man and Hunter Perry, Charlottes- 
ville; A. Frank O'Brien, Brient, 
Charles A. Sorhma, Walter J. Coulter 
and Bendheim, Richmond ; Bernard 
Depkin, A. E. Lichtman and Elmore 
Hines, Roanoke ; Mrs. Bertha Gor- 
don, Martinsville; J. S. Falls, Dan- 
ville ; Norman Ruben and R. E. Le- 
vine, Petersburg; R. V. Overy, South 
Boston ; J. E. Loth, Waynesboro ; I. 
Weinberg, Lexington ; Otto Wells, 
Norfolk ; R. H. Rippard, Farmville ; 
William S. Wilder and J. D. Hoffman, 
Norfolk, and Thalhimer. 

James D. Fitzgerald, secretary of 
the Washington code boards, was one 
of the speakers. 

A banquet at night was attended by 
city officials, wives of members and 
by Edwin S. Reid, Richard C. L. 
Moncure and Elizabeth C. Chalkley of 
the censor board. 



Sales Tax Struggle 
Again Hot in Ohio 

Columbus, July 19. — According to 
reliable information, a three per cent 
sales tax will be Governor White's 
chief recommendation to the General 
Assembly, which he has indicated he 
expects to call for a special tax ses- 
sion in September. Doubt is expressed 
that the measure will be passed by the 
present members whose terms expire 
at the end of the year. 

Opposition is being waged by the 
Ohio Council of Retail Merchants, 
which has representatives in the field 
bringing pressure to bear with pres- 
ent legislators, as well as candidates 
who will run in the August primaries. 

P. J. Wood, business manager I. 
T. O., is rallying exhibitors to the 
cause of the sales tax. He asks them 
to forget any existing affiliations, and 
immediately inaugurate an organized 
drive. This would cause repeal of 
the 10 per cent tax on admissions. 

Wood estimates that at least $3,000,- 
000 will have been paid by the indus- 
try by the end of the tax year. 

Mayer and Party to 
Sail on Staatendam 

Louis B. Mayer and Mrs. Mayer, 
Howard Strickling, Lew Wertheimer 
and Frank Orsatti sail on the Staaten- 
dam today for a European vacation. 
The party will proceed from London 
to Paris and Vichy, returning in four 
or five weeks by way of London. 

The Mayer party arrived from the 
coast by plane yesterday afternoon, 
Mrs. Mayer joining the group here. 



"Cleopatra" Preview 

Paramount will run off "Cleopatra" 
at the Criterion Tuesday morning at 
10 o'clock. 



New Finance Setup 
For Pathe Outlined 



(Continued from pane 1) 

Sanction of the stockholders may be 
sought in the near future. 

The plan is said to call for new 
financing later in the year. It is un- 
derstood Kidder, Peabody & Co. may 
underwrite a block of new convert- 
ible preferred stock. New common 
stock would also be authorized, with 
arrangements to pay off the accumu- 
lation on the current preferred in new 
common. 

Two shares of new common would 
be exchanged for each share of the 
present "A" stock, while each share 
of "B" stock would be entitled to one- 
twentieth of a share of new common. 

Holders of present six percent pre- 
ferred would receive one share of new 
preferred, convertible into new com- 
mon. In addition five shares of new 
common would be issued to get rid 
of the accumulation on the present 
senior issue. 

Stuart Webb, Pathe head, said last 
night new financing plans had been 
discussed by the directors, but that 
nothing definite had been decided 
upon. 

Tyrrell to Produce 
For Southern Spots 

Phil Tyrrell has gone into a new 
venture, producer and booker for a 
group of southern theatres which will 
offer a 12 to 14-week route for units 
of 22 to 53 people. Tyrrell was book- 
ing manager for the Radio City the- 
atres under Harold B. Franklin and 
later for the Detroit-Publix houses un- 
der Herschel Stuart. 

Theatres lined up in the southern 
venture include the following cities : 
Nashville, Louisville, Lexington, 
Wheeling, Charleston, W. Va. ; Mor- 
gantown, Cumberland, Clarksburg, 
Charlotte, Greensboro. Fairmount, 
Huntington, Atlanta and Montgomery. 

Tyrrell says he will produce 10 units 
out of his office, starting in August, 
and will have a field man to handle 
independent units. 

Universal Has Big 
Rise to Profit Side 

(Continued from page 1) 

charges, including $264,933.37 for de- 
preciation of fixed assets. 

Actually, the company states, the 
net operating profit was $199,609.70, 
but $158,608.43 was written off as a 
loss on settlement of notes receivable 
with a bankrupt theatre estate and 
$10,000 on balances in closed banks. 

Frisco Theatres to 
Reopen on Saturday 

(Continued from page 1) 

the walkout. Anthony Noriego, rep- 
resenting the theatrical unions, in- 
formed exhibitors that projectionists, 
musicians and stagehands would re- 
turn to work at once. Some 200 the- 
atres and 3,000 workers have been 
affected by the strike. 



Three Players to Leave 

Three players under contract to 
Paramount will leave today or tomor- 
row. They are Lanny Ross, scheduled 
for "College Rhythm" ; Anna May 
Wong, set for "Limehouse Blues," 
and Sylvia Sidney, who has been vaca- 
tioning here. 



The Leading 
Daily 



Newspaper 

Motion 
Picture 
Industry 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Alert, 

Intelligent 

and 

Faith fui 
Service to 
the Industry 
in All 
Branches 



VOL. 36. NO. 17 



NEW YORK, SATURDAY, JULY 21, 1934 



TEN CENTS 



Loew- Warner 
Fox Met Deal 
Seen Certain 



Agreement Is Reached 
With Bondholders 



Ultimate acquisition of the Fox 
Metropolitan circuit by Loew's and 
Warners appears to be certain as a 
result of the agreement reached with 
the bondholders' committee for pur- 
chase of the Fox Met bonds deposited 
with it for approximately $4,000,000. 

A report of the agreement on the 
purchase price of the bonds was made 
to Federal Judge Julian W. Mack yes- 
terday by Morton G. Bogue, counsel 
for the bondholders' committee, who 
requested and was granted an adjourn- 
ment to Aug. 6 to continue negotia- 
tions with Loew's and Warners on 
several ''minor points'' which remain 
unsettled. 

It was indicated at the court hear- 
ing yesterday that the final bid would 
(.Continued on page 4) 



Steffes Sees Local 
Censorship Stirred 

Minneapolis, July 20. — That the 
privilege extended to exhibitors to 
cancel pictures adjudged indecent by 
organized public opinion in any com- 
munity is an encouragement of local 
censorship is asserted in a letter for- 
warded to C. C. Petti john, counsel for 
the Hays organization, by Allied The- 
atre Owners of the Xorthwest. The 
letter bears the signature of W. A. 
Steffes, president. 

"Apparently the gentlemen you 
represent are desirous of having a 
censorship board created in every 
city, village and hamlet in the United 
States," says the letter. "If the only 
way an exhibitor can cancel pictures 
is by having a protest made by resi- 
dents of the community in which his 
(Continued on page 4) 



Academy in Appeal 
For Writers' Code 

Hollywood, July 20. — In an effort 
to make clear that the writer-producer 
code is no political move to strengthen 
the Academy, but is intended for the 
best interests of writers, whether or 
not members of the Academy or the 
guild, the Academy writers' branch 
committee has sent a letter to this 
effect to the executive committee of 
the Writers' Guild. 

Guild leaders say that the code, with 
few exceptions, was originally drafted 

(Continued on page 4) 



Blames Finance Ills on 
Industry's Poor Sense 



Gross Receipts Shriveled 
$63,681,836 in Two Years 



Washington, July 20. — Ranging from the peak salary of §315,000 
paid to an unnamed actor last year down the line to the 782 indi- 
viduals who each earned $12,000 or more, the report divulged by 
Division Administrator Sol A. Rosenblatt shows 966 men and 
women earned $23,143,839 last year. The compilation, drawn from 
the report, has been prepared by Motion Picture Daily and, in 
every instance, took the low figures where ranges in salaries, 
rather than fixed salaries, are mentioned. 

As against this, 923 totaled $226,000, or an average of less than 
$2,000 per person. 



Washington, July 20. — The salary report, prepared by Division Ad- 
ministrator Sol A. Rosenblatt, is probably the most extensive financial 
picture of the industry prepared so far in its history. 

From 1931 to 1933, the investigation discloses, gross receipts of pro- 
ducing and distributing companies surveyed dropped from $282,779,712 
to $219,097,876, while capital invested dropped from $200,562,082 to 
S106,875,416, and total assets from $338,501,841 to $206,887,111. In 
the same period, however, compensation payments by these companies 
jumped from 37.44 to 41.61 per cent for all individuals and from 31.24 
to 35.71 per cent for the regular payroll. 

From a high of $960,000,000 in 1930, the public's equity in the five 
largest companies — not mentioned by name, but obviously Paramount, 

{Continued on page 3) 



Warner Calls Fight on Star 
Dougherty Ban Hookup Asked 
4 Un-American' ByKuykendall 



Hollywood. July 20.— H. M. War- 
ner stirred wide comment here today 
by describing Cardinal Dougherty's 
Philadelphia theatre boycott as "un- 
American, because it is confiscation of 
a great industry and of the livelihood 
of thousands of people." 

Warner's remarks were made at a 
studio luncheon given for Postmaster 
General Farley and several prominent 
Democrats. A number of prominent 
film executives were present. 

"I didn't mean to talk about this," 
Warner said, "but it is highly im- 
portant to our company. When the 
cardinal of Philadelphia says it is a 
sin to go to the theatre, this is very 
un-American, because it is confiscation 
(Continued on page 4) 



Ed Kuykendall, head of the M. P. 
T. O. A., has taken a strong stand 
against the proposal of the Writers' 
and Actors' Guilds to stage a 13-week 
series of national broadcasts, the pro- 
ceeds of which will be divided by the 
guilds. 

Immediate protests to the guilds are 
being urged by exhibitor-members. 

In a special bulletin, after describ- 
ing the plan for selling the broadcasts 
to a national advertiser, Kuykendall 
writes : 

"Coming at this time when the mo- 
tion picture industry is beset by boy- 
cotts, hot weather, weak pictures, out- 
door amusements and other forces to 
lessen attendance, this seems to be an 

(Continued on page 4) 



Producers Responsible, 
Says Rosenblatt in 
Salary Report 



Washington, July 20. — Poor 
judgment on the part of producers is 
largely responsible for the present 
financial condition of the industry, it 
is stated in the salary report made 
public by Division Administrator Sol 
A. Rosenblatt. 

Faced With the problem of de- 
creased patronage and heavy fixed 
charges, it is pointed out, the indus- 
try was forced both to reduce theatre 
admissions and to attempt to improve 
the quality of pictures in an effort 
to increase attendance. 

"To accomplish this, the producers 
invited the public with glamorous and 
more glamorous screen personali- 
ties," the report declared, only to 
find that this "was a costly process 
and, moreover, that, once created, 
they were always open to the preda- 
tory raids of competing producers. 
Thus, in the scramble to attract the 
public, salaries of executives and 
screen stars were raised to abnormal 
heights." 

"By this action producers were fly- 
ing in the face of sound judgment," 

(Continued on page 3) 



Denver Manifesto 
Not Up to NRA Yet 

Washington, July 20. — The Den- 
ver manifesto repudiating Campi and 
its local boards and forwarded to 
Division Administrator Sol A. Ro- 
senblatt has not reached Washington 
yet, it was declared by him today. 
If referred here, it is not likely any 
action will be possible for at least 

(Continued on page 3) 



RKO on Offensive; 
Takes Two Theatres 

RKO launched its offensive against 
the Loew circuit yesterday when 
K-A-O, an RKO subsidiary, for- 
mally announced first of its theatre 
acquisitions in the Apollo, Clinton and 
Delancey Sts., and the Hollywood, 
6th St. and Ave. A. Both of them 
were part of the Manhattan Play- 
houses group. RKO will operate and 
book. 

The additions are in the thickly 
populated East Side where Loew op- 
erates the Delancey and the Ave. B. 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Saturday, July 21, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



(Registered U. S. Patent Office) 



Vol. 36 



July 21, 1934 



No. 17 




Martin Quigley 
Editor-Chief and Publisher 
MAURICE KANN J4R 
Editor 

JAMES A. CRON 
Advertising Manager 



Published daily except Sunday and holi- 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub- 
sidiary of Quigley Publications, Inc., 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 1790 Broadway, New 
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dress "Quigpubco, New York." All con- 
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Daily, Inc. Address all correspondence to 
the New York Office. Other Quigley pub- 
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Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Life 
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M. Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 407 
South Dearborn Street, Edwin S. Clif- 
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Entered as second class matter, January 
4, 1926 at the Post Office at New York 
City, N. Y., under Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada $15 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 



Warners Expected to 
Hold St. Louis Spot 

St. Louis, July 20. — Warners are 
expected to reopen the Shubert in Sep- 
tember. It is understood that the War- 
ner-First National, Radio and Para- 
mount product contracted for the house 
will not be played elsewhere. 

There is some curiosity as to 
whether this will create a shortage of 
product for the Ambassador, Grand 
Central and Missouri, just taken over 
by Allan Snyder and Harry Koplar. 
At present the houses are dark, but 
are to be opened in the early fall, ac- 
cording to plan, under Fanchon & 
Marco management. 



Warner-Epstein in Deal 

Warners and L. M. Epstein of the 
Film Exchange, Inc., have closed a 
deal whereby the latter will distribute 
all Warner and First National prod- 
uct, including Vitaphone shorts, in the 
West Indies and Guianas of South 
America. 



Sign Margaret Hamilton 

Hollywood, July 20. — Radio has 
signed Margaret Hamilton, character 
actress, to a three-picture contract. 
The studio brought her from New 
York originally for a role in "A 
Hat, Coat and Glove." 



Mascoli a Father 

Waterbury, July 20. — Nicholas 
Mascoli, operator of the Carroll and 
Alhambra here and the Community at 
Oakville, is the father of an eight- 
pound baby girl. 



Loew Canada Profit Franklin to Screen 
For 8 Mos. $23,589 Kern's "3 Sisters" 



Toronto, July 20. — An interim 
financial report by Marcus Loew's 
Theatres, Ltd., for the eight months 
ending last August shows a net profit 
of $23,589, with a balance carried for- 
ward of $590,180. 

The company stated that it had re- 
tired the last of a $600,000 bond issue 
last month. The amount refunded 
since last August was $43,000. 

Gross profit for Loew's Yonge St. 
Theatre for the eight months was 
$161,563, while the rental secured 
from Famous Players Canadian for 
the Uptown in the same period was 
$37,628. Assets are listed as in excess 
of $2,000,000. 

This is the company a group of 
shareholders of which are arguing for 
declaration of a dividend. 



File Plans to Join 
Astor and the Bijou 

Plans to combine the Astor and 
Bijou theatres into one house at a 
cost of approximately $150,000 were 
filed with the Manhattan Department 
of Buildings yesterday. 

Space for the stores now occupying 
space in the present buildings will be 
provided, and the present occupancies 
will not be changed. 

The proposed house will have a 
seating capacity of 1,120, with 759 of 
these in the orchestra and 361 in the 
balcony. 

The owner of the property is the 
Astor Theatre Realty Co., of which 
Walter Reade is president and Frank 
V. Storrs vice-president. Loew has it 
under lease. 



"Three Sisters," described as a 
musical romance by Jerome Kern and 
Oscar Hammerstein, 2nd, has been 
acquired by Harold B. Franklin. It 
will be his first musical film. 

"Three Sisters" was first produced 
last April at the Drury Lane, Lon- 
don. The music will not be heard in 
this country until the picture is ready. 
Production details have not been set- 
tled yet. 

This is in addition to a number of 
stage attractions which Selwyn & 
Franklin, in association with Arthur 
Hopkins, have lined up. 



Personal Appearances On 

Hollywood, July 20. — Joe Morri- 
son leaves for New York July 27 
for his week of personal appearances 
at the Paramount. 

Chester Morris left yesterday for 
a series of personal appearances in 
the east. 



Wampas Come Out Even 

Hollywood, July 20. — The loss of 
$300 on the Minneapolis Shrine frolic 
and a profit of that amount on the 
Chicago appearance of the Wampas 
"Baby Stars" makes it even, leaving 
nothing but the benefit of experience. 



Hitler Film Banned 
By Detroit's Police 

Detroit, July 20. — "Hitler's Reign 
of Terror" has been banned here by 
Police Commissioner H. E. Pickert 
and Superintendent John P. Smith. 
Pickert described the film as an "ob- 
vious fake." 

Samuel Cummins of Jewel Pro- 
ductions, Inc., has written Picker! 
that he will "defy your department" 
and says he hopes the ' city admin- 
istration is not running the city L r 
the benefit of the Nazis." 



U. A. Sets Nine More 

Simultaneously with the national 
release yesterday of "Bulldog Drum- 
mond Strikes Back," Al Lichtman, 
vice-president and general manager 
in charge of distribution for United 
Artists, made public dates on the next 
nine productions. 

The pictures and release dates fol- 
low : "Our Daily Bread," Aug. 10 ; 
"The Affairs of Cellini," Aug. 24; 
"The Count of Monte Cristo." Sept. 
7; "We Live Again," Sept. 21; "The 
Queen's Affair," Sept. 28 : "The 
Last Gentleman," Oct. 5 ; "The Pri- 
vate Life of Don Juan," Oct. 19 ; 
"Transatlantic Merry - Go - Round," 
Nov. 2; "Nell Gwyn" Nov. 9. 



Tyson to Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh, July 20. — -George Ty- 
son, for the last year operator of three 
Skouras houses in St. Louis with 
Cullen Espy, has been named manag- 
ing director of the Alvin here, which 
is to be opened shortly by Harris 
Amusement Co. Tyson was advertis- 
ing manager for Warners here until 
two vears ago. 



All on Big Board Slide 

Net 

High Low Close Change 

Columbia Pictures, vtc 2754 265-6 26Yt — 2% 

Eastman Kodak 10054 99 99 — 154 

Fox Film "A" n 10^ Vy/ 2 —V/ 2 

Loew's, Inc ?6% 2554 2554 —V-A 

Paramount Publix. cts 354 2% 3 — $* 

Pathe Exchange 1% iy s 154 — $£ 

Pathe Exchange "A" 19' 17$* 17$* — % 

rko 2 m . m — $£ 

Warner Bros 4 354 3% — $6 

Technicolor Drops % on Curb 

Net 

High Low Close Change 

Technicolor 1454 13% 13% — % 

Trans Lux 15^ \y s lj£ 

Most Bond Issues Take a Loss 

Net 

High Low Close Change 

General Theatre Equipment 6s '40 7 621s 7 +1 

Keith B. F. 6s '46 65 65 65 —2 

Loew's 6s '41. ww deb rights 101 101 101 — Y 2 

Paramount Broadway 5$*s '51 39 39 39 — Y A 

Paramount F .L. 6s '47 46 46 46 

Paramount Publix 5$4s '50 46 46 46 —1 

Pathe 7s '37, ww 9954 99 99 — 54 

Warner Bros. 6s '39, wd 52$g 51 52$6 +1% 



Sales 

300 
300 
200 
2,000 
5.900 
1.300 
1.700 
900 
7.500 



Sales 

3.300 
100 



Sales 

110 
1 

5 
12 

3 
1 
15 
74 



< Purely 
Personal ► 

CRESSON SMITH, western and 
southern sales manager for RKO, 
leaves July 30 for Atlanta to make 
a tour of exchanges at Charlotte, 
Jacksonville, Memphis, New Orleans 
and Oklahoma City. 

Pete's making pictures in Russia. 
Mickey is on the back of a horse 
somewhere in Yellowstone Park. 
Nora is visiting friends and Mrs. M. 
is off for Martha's Vineyard. Arthur 
Mayer now figures he'll stay in town 
and get some rest. 

Harry Goldman for Boston, Basil 
Brady for Buffalo and Israel Levine 
for New Haven are the latest addi- 
tions to the Mundus Distributing Corp. 
sales force. 

Sam Dembow, Jr., is summering at 
Milton Point, Rye. Exciting in his 
life is an expected early 1935 arrival, 
his first in 13 years of the marital 
state. 

Hal Rosson arrived here yesterday 
on his way to England to do the cam- 
era work on "The Scarlet Pimpernel" 
for London Films. 

Louis Friedlander gets into town 
by plane tomorrow to look for tal- 
ent for "Tailspin Tommy," which 
he will direct for Universal. 

G. Taylor Stanton, superintendent 
of the acoustical consulting department 
of Erpi, has been elected treasurer of 
the Acoustical Society of America. 

Robert Don at, who just finished 
work in "The Count of Monte 
Cristo." sailed for his home in Eng- 
land yesterday on the Olympic. 

Eva Le Gallienne and Dave 
Apollon are sailing aboard the 
Paris for Europe today. 



Para. Going Long Run 

Extended run engagements for the 
Paramount will be a temporary policy 
for the house beginning with the open- 
ing of "Cleopatra." While the policy 
is in effect no Paramount pictures will 
be shown here on a two-a-day basis 
at advanced admissions. "The Scarlet 
Empress." Marlene Dietrich's new- 
picture, is slated, along with "Cleo- 
patra." to play an extended run at 
the Paramount rather than a two-a- 
day. 

/. R. Stewart Passes 

Hamilton, Ont., July 20.— J. R. 
Stewart, veteran owner of the Lyric 
and Royal theatres, passed away here 
today after a brief illness. He was 
prominent as an independent, being 
an officer of Allied Exhibitors of 
Ontario and Associated Theatres, 
Ltd. of Toronto. Stewart has been 
identified with local theatres for the 
past 27 years. 



Kan. Bank Nights Legal 

Kansas City, July 20. — Roland 
Boynton. attorney general of Kansas, 
reversing earlier opinions, today up- 
held a court decision that bank nights 
are legal, not constituting a lottery. 
The new ruling is to be given to the 
grievance board at tomorrow's session, 
when it will decide the question of le- 
gality with respect to the code. 



Warner, Wilk on Way 

Hollywood, July 20. — Harry War- 
ner and Jacob Wilk were eastbound 
tonight. 



Saturday, July 21, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Poorjudgment 
Is Criticized 
By Rosenblatt 



(Continued from page 1) 

Rosenblatt continued, pointing out 
that it was made difficult, if not im- 
possible, to adjust production costs to 
the new era of generally depressed 
earnings. 

"Among the factors contributing to 
the distressed financial condition of 
the motion picture industry," Ro- 
senblatt found, "were a greatly re- 
duced mass audience for screen enter- 
tainment by reason of widespread un- 
employment ; great operating losses, 
due to undoubted over-investment in 
large type theatres ; cutthroat com- 
petition for the services of outstand- 
ing screen personalities, resulting in 
excessive salary ranges, making it 
difficult to secure economical produc- 
tion. 

"This star system of selecting art- 
ists tends to create an artificial scar- 
city of talent. Its operation tends to 
force the supposed values of artists 
to fantastic figures by withholding 
from the market the potentially avail- 
able services of executive ability and 
artistic talent of equal ability. 

"The inflated values which produ- 
cers have placed upon a limited num- 
ber of executives and artists have 
created a vicious circle of bidding for 
their services. The creatures of the 
system have turned to plague their 
masters." 

Need "Drastic Corrective" 

"Inflated capital structures require 
drastic corrective measures which 
come by the operation of the laws of 
economics during depression periods 
with operating losses," the report 
commented. 

"Increased activity of stockholders 
in the operations of their companies 
may result in an incentive to sounder 
and better management, and sucn ac- 
tivity has been and should be wel- 
comed by able and competent man- 
agement." 

Although drastic readjustments 
have been made since the depression, 
"no convincing evidence exists to in- 
dicate that basic production costs 
have been greatly reduced, or that 
any substantial progress has been 
made toward the elimination of those 
practices prevalent within the indus- 
try which tend to depress the quality 
of motion picture entertainment of- 
fered the consuming public." 

"Rationalization of production costs 
remains the essence of the problems 
in the financial rehabilitation of the 
production division of the motion pic- 
ture industry," according to the re- 
port. 

Actors and actresses combined, not 
including extras, received 8.6 per cent 
of the gross in producing-distributing 
companies ; 10.8 per cent in produc- 
ing companies. If executives, super- 
visors and clerical and office em- 
ployes are eliminated from the ratios, 
the remaining individuals, who might 
be classed as direct production em- 
ployes, represent 26.7 per cent of the 
gross of the producer-distributors and 
40.1 per cent for producers. 

These figures, Rosenblatt com- 
mented, show a tendency toward an 
increased ratio of compensation in 
producing and producing-distributing 



Gross Receipts Shriveled 
$63,681,836 in Two Years 



(Continued from page 1) 

Fox, M-G-M, Radio and Warners— dropped to $140,000,000 on the 
basis of stock market quotations current at the time the report was 
closed. 

A composite chart of production, distribution and exhibition revealed 
these figures : 

Year Assets Net 

1931 $938,158,000 $21,459,000 

1932 762,115,000 41,364,000 

1933 667,875,000 19,589,000 

In one year, then, the industry not onlv relinquished a profit balance 
of $21,459,000, but dipped into the red to the tune of $41,364,000. Indic- 
ative of better times, however, is the recovery in 1933 over 1932 when 
losses shrank to $29,589,000. 

In 1931, the industry had a regular pavroll of $133,240,587 divided 
among 48,275 employes. In 1932, it was $109,616,000 and 47,422 work- 
ers, thereby emphasizing that the industry maintained its level of num- 
bers of men and women employed while at the same time reducing its 
payroll overhead. Obviously, these statistics do not embrace the entire*, 
exhibition business throughout the United States, on the other hand. 

The salary bracket covering Hollywood is of considerable interest. 
It demonstrates that over a two-year period more performers were 
employed, but the total amount of wages reduced. In 1931, for instance, 
performers used totaled 20,503 ; they earned $37,077,527. In 1933, per- 
formers used totaled 28,055, but they earned only $25,834,977. 

Yet this has no bearing on the increased earning power of individuals, 
such as outstanding drawing cards. 

Further analysis of the more than 100 pages of statistics included in 
the report reveals that compensation to individuals last year represented 
41.3 per cent of the gross receipts of producing-distributing companies; 
52.8 per cent for producing companies ; 25.3 per cent for distributors, 
and 25.6 per cent for exhibiting companies. 



companies in proportion to decreased 
gross receipts ; a general tendency in 
producing and producing-distributing 
companies for a greater share of sal- 
ary costs out of gross receipts than 
is customary in other forms of enter- 
prise, where the ratio of salary costs 
to receipts generally ranges around 
25 per cent; and the apparent ab- 
sence of any standard cost account- 
ing formula in the fixation of pro 
duction costs, where ordinarily in- 
dustries of the size and importance of 
this do generally employ a standard 
formula. 

The report may do much to blast 
the myth of tremendous salaries to 
actors. Actors receiving salary at 
the rate of $1,000 per week were 
shown to have averaged $500 during 
the year. Others with a salary of 
$10,000 per week earned one week's 
pav. A $1,500 per week actress re- 
ceived $250 for the year. A $5,000 
a week artist made one day's pay. 
Only a very few of those on a week- 
ly salary made a full year's pay. Fur- 
ther, it is pointed out, by the opera- 
tion of the income tax laws, the net 
compensation in many instances will 
be less than the gross compensation 
as disclosed in the report. 

Three Appeals Heard 
By Campi Committee 

Three appeals from local board rul- 
ings were heard yesterday by a Campi 
appeal committee consisting of R. fi. 
Cochrane, chairman ; Harry Buxbaum 
and O. C. Lam. Cases heard were 
an overbuying complaint filed against 
Jefferson "Amusement Co., Beaumont, 
Texas, by the Ria, appealed from the 
Dallas grievance board ; a clearance 
and zoning complaint appealed from 
the Chicago board and brought by the 



YVestmont, Westmont, 111., against the 
Tivoli, Downers Grove, 111., and a 
reduced admission complaint appealed 
from the Omaha grievance board by 
the Rialto and Loop, Sioux City, la., 
with the Orpheum, Sioux City, as re- 
spondent. 

Recommendations on all three cases 
will be filed with Campi by the com- 
mittee later. 



Penalty, Raid 
Clauses Are 
Sidetracked 



Hearing Is Set for 
Los Angeles Zoning 

Los Angeles, July 20. — Because of 
a deluge of individual protests on the 
zoning schedule the clearance and zon- 
ing board has called a general meet- 
ing for next Wednesday morning at 
which the whole problem of clearance 
and dual bills will be threshed out. 

All protestants, including exhibitors, 
producers and distributors, have been 
invited to attend. 

Ben Berinstein, operating the Wil- 
tern, filed a grievance complaint 
against F. W. C, operating the Em- 
bassy, three blocks away, which, he 
charges, gives away refrigerators to 
attract patronage. 



Denver Manifesto 
Not Up to NRA Yet 

(Continued from page 1) 

two weeks since Rosenblatt leaves 
for the coast Monday. 

The division administrator assert- 
ed he had heard nothing regarding 
the Denver situation and stated he 
could not comment on the matter un- 
til he had the manifesto and Campi's 
comment before him. 

Present plans call for Rosenblatt 
to leave Washington Monday after- 
noon, arriving at Pasadena Thurs- 
day. 



The famed $10,000 penalty clause, 
aimed at employers (producers) for 
encouraging excessive salaries through 
competitive bidding, continues to grace 
the textual content of the code al- 
though no action will be taken to en- 
force it. This is the clause which 
Division Administrator Sol A. Ros- 
enblatt, in his salary report released 
in Washington Friday night, found 
"incapable of effective administration" 
and recommended for continued in- 
definite suspension. 
^ This section of the code — Part 4, 
Section A, Article 5, dealing with un- 
fair practices — is the clause which 
was included in the document as the 
result of the expressed opinion of the 
President on "unconscionable salaries." 
It reads : 

"To avoid the payment of sums un- 
reasonably in excess of the fair value 
of personal services which results in un- 
fair and destructive competition, the 
Code Authority shall have the power, 
with the approval of the Administrator, 
to investigate whether in any case any 
employer in the motion picture indus- 
try has agreed to pay an unreasonably 
excessive inducement to any person to 
enter into the employ of such employ- 
er. If the Code Authority finds that 
such employer has done so, the Code 
Authority shall have the power, with 
the approval of the Administrator, to 
impose an assessment against such 
employer in the amount of the unrea- 
sonable excess payment to such person 
not. however, to exceed the sum of Ten 
Thousand Dollars ($10,000.00), and to 
make public its findings, but nothing 
in this part shall in any manner impair 
the validity or enforcement of such 
agreement of employment. All such 
assessments shal lbe paid to the Code 
Authority for use by it in the admin- 
istration of its functions." 

Origin of Suspension 

The original suspension, now con- 
tinued, was provided for in the execu- 
tive order which accompanied enact- 
ment of the code. This Presidential' 
decree, originally giving General 
Johnson the right of review of any 
decision made by Code Authority, was 
the order which took top line execu- 
tives to a White House conference 
last December to protest on the 
ground it would eliminate the indus- 
try's right of self regulation. Subse- 
quently, the order was modified by an 
explanatory statement from Johnson, 
although the text was not altered. 

Indefinite continuance of the sus- 
pension of those portions of the code 
dealing with "star raids," a practice 
hit by Rosenblatt, refer to Subdivision 
C, Section 1, Part 5 of the section 
dealing with producers and Sections 
2, 3, 4 and 6 under the same part. 

In essence these clauses were 
designed to rule out secret talent ne- 
gotiations and throw them into the 
open. They barred negotiations or 
offers to those under contract else- 
where prior to the final 30 days of 
existing pact and made it mandatory, 
when offers were made, for the pros- 
pective employer to so notify the em- 
ployer then holding the talent sought 
on the competitive bid. The old em- 
ployer was to be extended the privi- 
lege of meeting the new offer over a 
three and a six-month period, depend- 
ing upon the salary bracket involved. 

The clause was fought bitterly by 
agents and their lawyers during hectic 
code formulation days in Washington 
last year. 



4 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Saturday. July 21, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE DAILY* 
HOLLYWOOD PREVIEW 



"Straight Is the Way" 

(M-G-M) 

Hollywood, July 20. — Concentrating on heart interest and emotional 
values, this film, adapted from the stage play "Four Walls," is tem- 
pered with excitement blended with laughs and tears and peopled with 
human beings. 

Franchot Tone, released from prison, is being awaited by his doting 
mother (May Robson) and the girl who loves him (Karen Morley). 
Home again, he gets enmeshed with his old mob, headed by Jack La 
Rue. His old sweetie (Gladys George) tries to play him against La 
Rue for a triangular conflict. Tone's inner battle to find himself, to 
find love, to choose between the calls of Miss George and Miss Morley, 
and his desire to go straight give a personal flavor to the dramatic 
values, spread before the teeming canvas of East Side life. 

Miss Robson gives pathos and loveliness to the mother role. Miss 
George, a newcomer, has flame. Others supporting Tone and Miss 
Morley in the leads are Nat Pendleton, C. Henry Gordon, Raymond 
Hatton, William Bakewell and James Qualen, who contribute nicely. 
Paul Sloane does a competent job of direction. Bernard Shubert wrote 
the screen play. 

The production, produced for mass appeal, is down to earth and is 
above program picture calibre. Running time, 60 minutes. 



"Housewife" 

( Warners) 

Hollywood, July 20. — This is a little more than a variation of the old 
triangle without particularly new trimmings. The picture's greatest 
asset is a thoroughly good cast, which gives to trite situations zest and 
punch. 

The story deals with George Brent and Ann Dvorak, happily married 
until Brent amasses a huge bankroll as an advertising agent. The money 
goes to his head and he falls for Bette Davis, the office beauty. On the 
verge of divorce, an accident to their son brings George and Ann to- 
gether again. 

John Halliday plays the stereotyped role of the patient friend in love 
with the wife. Ruth Donnelly and Hobart Cavanaugh as friends and 
Willard Robertson as the judge contribute good comedy. Director Alfred 
E. Green gives inspiration to the picture and the cast. 

The picture will go best where the cast names will draw. Running 
time, 70 minutes. 



Warner Calls 
Dougherty Ban 
' Un-American ' 



(Continued from page 1) 

of a great industry and of the liveli- 
hood of thousands of people." 

The talk was received in silence. 

Warner continued with a suggestion 
that the postmaster general issue a 
stamp containing a picture of "one of 
our charming girls," charge an extra 
cent for it and "send the proceeds out 
here to take care of the distress that 
would be caused if the cardinal's ad- 
vice were taken." 

Farley made only a veiled reference 
to the situation by saying : "You will 
always, and always must, respond to 
public opinion. Only bv doing that 
can you hope to prosper and win the 
approval of all our citizens." 



Steffes Sees Local 
Censorship Stirred 

(Continued from page 1) 

theatre is located, I am afraid the 
industry is inviting more trouble than 
the Legion of Decency has given it 
to date. 

"The Legion of Decency is a na- 
tional organization and why should not 
pictures condemned, barred or black- 
listed by an organization of such wide 
scope and magnitude not be sufficient 
to allow every theatre owner in the 
United States to cancel pictures 
banned by them, if he so desires, 
rather than insist that local boards be 
established all over the United 
States?" 



C. C. Petti john could not be reached 
yesterday. He was reported out of 
town. Comment on Steffes' letter was 
withheld pending his return. A copy 
had not yet reached the M. P.P. DA 
office, it was said. 

Drive Held Imperilled 
By Publicity Seekers 

Fear that the crusade for clean films 
is in danger of becoming "unwork- 
able, if not ridiculous" through the 
activities of "notoriety seekers" being 
drawn to it is expressed in an edi- 
torial in the Catholic News, out to- 
day. 

"All sorts of notoriety seekers are 
getting into the clean movies cru- 
sade now that organized effort among 
Catholics has demonstrated that it is 
possible to compel Hollywood produ- 
cers to mend their ways," the editorial 
says. "There is danger, therefore, 
that the whole movement may be made 
unworkable, if not ridiculous, by the 
demands of unreasonable individuals." 



Clean Film Campaign 
Dangerous — Franklin 

Current agitation against objection- 
able films is "fraught with dangerous 
possibilities to an industry that may 
be hampered in its free expression," 
writes Harold B. Franklin in the cur- 
rent issue of The Theatre, house 
organ of Frankwyn Prod. 

Producers, Franklin writes, are in 
full sympathy with the objections to 
immoral stories on the screen. He also 
says the most successful pictures of 



the past have been those that appeal 
to the "finer emotions," but, he con- 
tinues : 

"If the cinema is to attain the art- 
istic pinnacle that seems to be its des- 
tiny, it must patiently meet the issue, 
eliminate vulgarity and find some way 
to segregate motion pictures that are 
not intended for juvenile consumption, 
ff there is to be a cinematic literature 
it will come only if the screen dram- 
atists and producers are given every 
opportunity for free expression. This, 
however, must not be construed as 
license to produce subjects in obvious 
bad taste." 

Tobias A. Keppler 
Critically Injured 

Tobias A. Keppler, attorney, well 
known in film circles, was critically 
injured in the offices of Referee Rob- 
ert Stephenson, 29 Broadway, yester- 
day. 

Keppler, who is 55 years old, was 
knocked through a glass door, suffer- 
ing severe cuts. He was taken to the 
Broad St. Hospital, where his condi- 
tion last night was reported to be 
"just fair." His alleged assailant, Mil- 
ton Gordon, was arrested. The cause 
of the fight was not learned. Keppler, 
last summer, was instrumental in or- 
ganizing independent producers and 
distributors into what later became 
the Federation of the M. P. Industry. 



War on Star Hookup 
Asked by Kuykendall 

(Continued from page 1) 

unbusinesslike, unfair and unreason- 
able plan to undermine theatre attend- 
ance. Many patrons of established the- 
atres, whose film rentals pay the star 
salaries, will remain at home to hear 
these stars and radio plays for noth- 
ing rather than go and pay admission 
to the theatre to hear the same star do 
the same or similar stuff. How can 
we sell such entertainment, stars and 
personalities if the advertiser subsi- 
dizing the performance gives it away 
for nothing? 

"Prompt and strong action should 
be taken by theatre owners to protest 
and prevent such broadcasting. Write 
or wire the Screen Actors' Guild and 
let them know how you feel, protest 
to the stars and studios against such 
unfair competition. Do it now before 
it gets under way and you may not 
have to regret not doing it later on." 

Passaic Mortgage Paid 

Passaic, N. J., July 20.— The $250,- 
000 mortgage which the Harris 
brothers gave on their Capitol theatre 
building here eight years ago has been 
paid off in full. Payment was made 
this week through the Guarantee Mort- 
gage and Title Insurance Co. 



Loew- Warner 
Fox Met Deal 
Seen Certain 

(Continued from page 1) 

be completed in the meantime. Con- 
summation of the deal, however, could 
not be had prior to late August as an 
opportunity would have to be given , 
all bondholders to appear in court 
after completion of the Loew-Warner 
bid to express their views on the offer 
and on the existing reorganization 
plan devised by the bondholders' com- 
mittee or on any similar reorganization 
plan which may be developed in the 
meantime. This is expected to take 
about three weeks additionally follow- 
ing the completion of the Loew- 
Warner bid. 

Acquisition of the Fox Met bonds, 
as contemplated in the new $4,000,000 
bid, will put Loew's and Warners in 
the position now occupied by the bond- 
holders' committee. It would give 
them control of more than 85 per cent 
of the $12,500,000 Fox Met notes out- , 
standing. With these, Loew's and 
Warners would proceed to foreclose 
on the circuit, taking over its assets i 
of 79 leaseholds and eight fee proper- 
ties and proceeding with their own re- 
organization. 

In addition to the $4,000,000 to be ' 
paid the bondholders' committee for 
the bonds deposited with it, bond- 
holders would also come into posses- 
sion of approximately $1,000,000 cash 
now held by Irving Trust Co., re- 
ceiver for Fox Met. 

No government interference with 
the Loew-Warner deal for the circuit 
is anticipated, it was learned yester- 
day, if the ultimate reorganization 
plan achieves a complete divorce of 
operation of the theatres by Loew's 
and Warners. This is contemplated 
by the bidders, as the ultimate di- 1 
vision of the circuit would give War- 
ners the New Jersey houses and 
Loew's the remainder, with the Loew- 
Warner bidding combination terminat- 
ing there. 

John H. Amen, special assistant to 
the attorney general, again was a spec- 
tator at yesterday's court hearing. 

Academy in Appeal 
For Writers' Code 

(Continued from page 1) 

by members who are now leading fig- 
ures in the guild. 

One of the passages of the letter 
reads : 

"The existing writer-producer code 
is not a political issue between the 
academy and the guild and nothing 
should be permitted to interfere in 
any way with all writers getting full 
benefits of the code. We ask that you 
acquaint your members with their 
rights under this code and to empha- 
size that the code will continue to be 
administered without any distinction 
between the academy or guild mem- 
bers." 

The Writers' Guild has passed a 
resolution to abide by the code now 
being formulated and to be passed 
upon by the five-five committee of the 
NRA. A meeting of the executive 
board is to be called to discuss the 
practicability of accepting the writer- 
producer code negotiated by the acad- 
emy. It is believed doubtful that they 
will accept this in its entirety 7 . 



The Leading 
Daily 

-. \ ■ x 

Newspaper 

Motion 
Picture 
Industry 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



NEW YORK, MONDAY, JULY 23, 1934 



Theatre Grosses Show Drop 
Of $88,540,917 in 2 Years 

Washington, July 22. — Painting a startling picture of what has hap- 
pened in exhibition, further analysis of the salary report made by Divi- 
sion Administrator Sol A. Rosenblatt shows gross theatre receipts 
dropped $88,540,917 from their $260,410,597 total in at the end of 1931 
to $171,869,680 at the end of 1933. 

Noting the shrinkage which has prevailed throughout the entire 
industry, the statistics on exhibition include these : 

1931 1932 1933 

Gross receipts $260,410,597 $216,892,126 $171,869,680 

Capital investment ... . 297,516,406 255,886,015 238,313,838 

Surplus and reserves... 64,741,732 39,725,706 19,906,678 

Total assets 599,656,480 521,312,233 460,988,049 

Net profit or loss 5,054,611 —13,979,210 —10,268,891 

{Continued on page 8) 



VOL. 36. NO. 18 

Wisconsin Up 
In Arms Over 
Cancellations 

Allied Unit Says Banned 
Films Forced on It 

Milwaukee, July 22. — Declaring lo- 
cal exchanges have refused to co-oper- 
ate in cancelling salacious pictures, Al- 
lied Independent Theatre Owners of 
Wisconsin is waging a publicity cam- 
paign explaining their position to 
Catholic societies, clubs and organiza- 
tions, which have stood for the aboli- 
tion of block booking. Both newspa- 
per publicity and bulletins are being 
used with 80 parent-teacher organiza- 
tions in the state contacted. 

According to R. A. Tesch, business 
manager for Allied, one state exhibi- 
tor went to five local exchanges trying 
to cancel pictures on the condemned 
iist and was unable to do so. Various 
clubs and organizations here are send- 

(Continued on page 7) 

K. C. Men Skeptical 
Over Cancellations 

Kansas City, July 22. — Heads of 
both exhibitor organizations in this 
territory question whether the major 
distributors' decision to permit cancel- 
lations on moral grounds was not in- 
tended to shift responsibility for show- 
ing objectionable films to the exhibitor. 

At the same time, it was reported 
numerous exhibitors, particularly in- 
dependents in Kansas City, were pre- 
paring to take immediate advantage of 
the cancellation ri<;ht. 

Jay Means, president of the I. T. O.. 
commended the distributors for taking 
(Continued on page 7) 

St. Louis to Abide 
By Legion, Council 

St. Louis. July 22. — Any picture 
banned by both the local Legion of 
Decency and Better Films Council will 
be regarded by members of the M.P. 
T.O. of St. Louis. Eastern Missouri 
and Southern Illinois as coming within 
the cancellation provisions for any 
picture to which there is a genuine 
(Continued on page 7) 

Chortle Over Duals 
Flop in Cleveland 

Cleveland, July 22. — Local ex- 
hibitors, all of whom unanimously 
eliminated double features on July 8, 
point with satisfaction to the low 
record at the Hanna during its three 
day existence as the only downtown 
double feature house in the city. They 
(Continued on page 3) 



New Fox Met 
Angle Seeks 
Reorganizing 

Indicating potential complications in 
the Fox Met situation, a petition for 
reorganization under the new bank- 
ruptcy laws was filed by a group of 
bondholders of the circuit in U. S. 
District court here over the week-end. 

Archibald Palmer, downtown at- 
torney, represented the petitioning 
bondholders, but could not be reached 
on Saturday for questioning as to the 
identity of holders and the amount of 
bonds he represents. It was stated 
by attorneys close to the Fox Met 
situation, however, that the petition- 
ing holders represented a "very small 
minority" of the $12,500,000 of Fox 
Met bonds outstanding. 

More than 85 per cent of the bonds, 
it was pointed out, have been de- 
posited with the bondholders' commit- 
tee which is negotiating with Loew's 
and Warners for a sale of their hold- 
ings for approximately $4,000,000. 
The petition for reorganization under 
(Continued on page 3) 



'Frisco Houses Back 
To Normal Once More 

San Francisco, July 22. — All quiet 
on the theatre front here. Houses 
operated normally over the week-end. 
following their temporary shutdown 
while the general strike raged. 

The Federated Women's Clubs, the 
Parent-Teachers' Ass'ns and the M.P. 
Council have gone civic by protesting 
against newsreel coverage of the 
strike. The protest was registered 
with Hulda McGinn, manager of the 
I California Theatre Ass'n. 



MPTO to Sift 
Film Comment 
For Studios 

An M. P. T. O. A. production con- 
tact committee has been appointed to 
relay to studio executives reactions of 
independent exhibitors nationally and 
the public to types of pictures, per- 
sonalities, scenes and dialogue in new 
releases, it is stated in the national 
exhibitor organization's general bulle- 
tin distributed Saturday. It is inti- 
mated that the reports will be influ- 
ential in guiding production changes 
imposed by the church decency cam- 
paign. 

Walter Vincent of New York is 
chairman of the committee. R. B. 
W'ilby, Atlanta: E. C. Beatty, De- 
troit ; Karl Hoblitzelle, Dallas, and 
Morgan A. Walsh, San Francisco, are 
members. The committee will gather, 
correlate and forward the information 
to the studios. 

"It has developed," the bulletin 
states, "that the responsible heads of 
the studios are sincerely and keenly 

(Continued on page 7) 



Nazis Seek to Force 
Cultural Film Use 

That the Nazi government will take 
steps to force exhibitors to include 
cultural films in their programs is in- 
dicated in dispatches from Berlin over 
the week-end. 

This is understood to be in accord 
with Adolf Hitler's efforts to elevate 
the quality of films. Another step 
toward this end, it is revealed, is pos- 
sible abolition of the rebate system 
under which small producers have 
been underbidding competitors, 



Alert, 

Intelligent 

and 

Faith fut 
Service to 
the Industry 
in All 
Branches 



TEN CENTS 



See Hurdles 
Confronting 
Percentages 

Early Opinion Views NRA 
Idea Variously 

it may be a fine theory on paper, 
but practical application of a percen- 
tage plan for talent, controlled through 
a commission with or without govern- 
ment participation, as suggested by 
Division Administrator Sol A. Rosen- 
blatt in his salary report, is something 
else again. This is the first reaction 
of ranking executive opinion in New 
York, as reflected in scattered and in- 
complete comment available over the 
week-end. 

Those reached for an expression of 
opinion, voiced privately and with 
strict injunctions against quotations 
incidentally, envisioned many obstacles 
in the path of such an idea. There 
was, for instance, one individual who 
speculated if a commission to deter- 
mine percentages could function with- 
out contravening the law. 

A second objection immediately 
raised was the practicability of such a 

(Continued on page 8) 



ChurchBoardWould 
Displace Hays Ass'n 

A permanent board of control for 
the industry to be composed of repre- 
sentatives of the public, the national 
religious ministry and producers and 
distributors, is proposed in a plan ad- 
vanced over the week-end by the New 
York Board of Jewish Ministers, 
which is scheduled to be presented 
(Continued on page 7) 

Campaign Hops Line, 
Reaches Into Mexico 

By JAMES LOCKHART 

Mexico City, July 22. — The decency 
campaign today reached across the 
border when 30,000 residents of Ciudad 
Juarez, State of Chihuahua, across the 
international border from El Paso, 
Tex., pledged themselves to shun 
theatres which run pictures considered 
off color. This goes for their own 
city as well as for El Paso. 

Anticipation is the movement will 
now spread to other parts of Mexico. 

Fleischer Lines U p 
3rd Dimension Plan 

Buffalo, July 22. — The illusion of 
depth and objects seen in relief and 
perspective was demonstrated at a 
screening of Max and Dave Fleischer's 

(Continued on page 3) 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



Monday, July 23, 1934 



MOTION PICTURE 

DAILY 



(Registered U. S. Patent Office) 



Vol. 36 



July 23, 1934 No. 18 




Martin Quigley 
Editor-Chief and Publisher 
MAURICE KANN Jmr, 
Editor 

JAMES A. CRON 
Advertising Manager 



Published daily except Sunday and holi- 
days by Motion Picture Daily, Inc., sub- 
sidiary of Quigley Publications, Inc., 
Martin Quigley, President; Colvin Brown, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 

Publication Office: 1790 Broadway. New 
York. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Cable ad- 
dress "Quigpubco, New York." All con- 
tents copyrighted 1934 by Motion Picture 
Daily, Inc. Address all correspondence to 
the New York Office. Other Quigley pub- 
lications: MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 
BETTER THEATRES, THE MOTION 
PICTURE ALMANAC and THE CHI- 
CAGOAN. 

Hollywood Bureau: Postal Union Life 
Building, Vine and Yucca Streets, Victor 
M. Shapiro, Manager; Chicago Bureau: 407 
South Dearborn Street, Edwin S. Clif- 
ford, Manager; London Bureau: Remo 
House, 310 Regent St., London, W. 1, 
Bruce Allan, Representative. Cable address: 
"Quigpubco, London"; Berlin Bureau: 
Berlin - Tempelhof , Kaiserin - Augustastrasse 
28, Joachim K. Rutenberg, Representative; 
Paris Bureau: 19, Rue de la_Cour-des- 
Noues, Pierre Autre, Representative; Rome 
Bureau: Viale Gorizia, Vittorio Malpassuti, 
Representative; Sydney Bureau, 102 Sus- 
sex Street, Cliff Holt, Representative; Mex- 
ico City Bureau: Apartado 269, ]ames 
Lockhart, Representative; Glasgow Bureau: 
86 Dundrennan Road, G. Holmes, Repre- 
sentative; Budapest Bureau: 3, Kaplar-u, 
Budapest, II, Endre Hevesi, Representa- 
tive. 

Entered as second class matter, January 
4, 1926 at the Post Office at New York 
City, N. Y., under Act of March 3, 1879. 

Subscription rates per year: $6 in the 
Americas, except Canada $15 and foreign 
$12. Single copies: 10 cents. 



Warners Seen After 
Allen in Cleveland 

Cleveland, July 22. — Rumors are 
persistent that Warners are about to 
take over the Allen from Myer Fine, 
Abe Kramer, P. E. Essick and Max 
Lefkowosh, who have been operating 
the house for the past year and a 
half. The Allen, originally built by 
Jules and J. J. Allen, passed from 
their hands into the control of Loew's 
Ohio Theatres where it remained until 
taken over by the independent ex- 
hibitor group. 



Warners Darken 4 

Canton, O., July 22. — Warners 
have closed several theatres in this 
area, according to Nat Wolf, zone 
manager. Those recently closed in- 
clude the Lake and Variety in Cleve- 
land, Kenton at Kenton and the Plaza 
at Sandusky. 



According to Order 

Buffalo, July 22. — Presented by his 
wife with an eight-pound daughter as 
per his specifications, Herbert T. 
Silverberg, film attorney, is going to 
pick a name for his offspring by 
numerology. The Silverbergs also 
have a son two years old. 



Majestic Men In 

Thomas A. Branon, of Affiliated 
Producers, Atlanta, and Harry Asher 
and Morris Segal, Majestic Pictures, 
Inc., Boston and Cincinnati, respec- 
tively, all franchise holders, are in 
town on business with Majestic. 



Insiders' Outlook 



COL ROSENBLATT'S salary immediately leaps to the fore is 

^ report is fascinatingly inter- best symbolized by three little 

esting in point of statistical for- words. They are: "What of it?" 

midability, but it is in that direc- . . . 

tion only that it contains facts y 

which are new Anyone who may The anti . star raid cl t 

have overlooked or who may have wag , , SQ WQrds Tq 

forgo ten the terrific wallop h.s kin wh . ag £ j as the 

industry has taken m the last two „.if„_ TV , „ m 5, , 

r , , ... . , other, Ihe arrangement was de- 
years will find a forcible reminder ■ , . ?j „ . . 

; , , ^ it signed to permit old emplovers to 

by devoting a few minutes to the ° . .< a t i 

J r ■ r , • . . meet the offers of potential em- 
mass of information the division , ( ■ , 

, ... , - , , . , ... ployers ot their talent over a 

administrator, through his facia- f. j • • j r 1 

. -i , r~, , three and six-month period fol- 

ties, has compiled, ihe wonder , • ■ c , . 

• • i- 1 5 r. 1 ^ ^ n lowing expiration of contracts, 

is, m the light of what the figures « • ° j , , 

' , f , & Again and perhaps workable on 

reveal, that so many o the old- 5 what fa * ng fa fact and 

lme companies are still around in F deed? T he human element- 

each morning to conduct their . . rr n A 4. • i c 

I . b the constant Hollywood trick of 

usmess. . . . steaming up desirable talent by 

rjyi j , • ,« , dangling alluring offers of higher 

Ihe recommendation that the ? ,i .■ c 

<Mnnnn u i ( an d higher pay; the gvrations of 

$10,001) penaltv clause for en- & , r J ' . aj * 

. r J , , , . unscrupulous agents w-ho live 

couragmg unreasonable salaries ... r , ? , n 

, . ? ° , , • , , . better when their 10 per cent is 

and those clauses designed to set , . , , . , 

. r ■ .■ , better and who negotiate accord- 

up a system of circumventing star , , , ° . . , 

• j . • • • , r mglv — has been entirely over- 
raids continue m indefinite sus- , , J , , , . , J . < 

, looked and completely negated on 
pension because they are not , i i.iT i.-i. 

v r , , J what is purely a theory which, 

enforceable comes as anvthmg . r . r , J 

, • T i.l c i. i so far at least, has never trans- 

but a surprise. In the first place, r , .. ir V ... 

t, i j ,i . ferred itself from writing to 

the penalty clause was added to ac tion 
the code out of deference to the 
President and his memorable re- " 
marks concerning "unconscion- Lacking in significance, except 

able salaries." Moreover, its to some NRA officials perhaps, is 

inclusion was in that its intent at Rosenblatt's conclusion that stars 

the outset never would have are worth what they draw at the 

brought about the objective for box-office. When was there ever 

which it was created. . . . any question about that ? The 

y tragedy here is that many stars, 

This is obvious because the who aren't that at all any longer, 
penalty would not have vitiated continue to earn compensation far 
the contract on which such a fine out of line with their actual draw- 
was to be invoked, but merely ing power. Yet, you tell us 
sock the guilty producer an extra because we don't know and have 
$10,000 for having engineered been trying to find out for almost 
such a pact. Suppose — this is two decades now, exactly how is 
purely a case in point — Metro the drawing value of a star to be 
offered Greta Garbo $250,000 for accurately gauged ? The one way 
two pictures and this came to be is on percentage, but there again 
viewed as a step encouraging un- are difficulties not easy to sur- 
reasonable salaries. Metro, if mount. Rosenblatt's conclusions 
found guilty, would pay the on trade procedure in this in- 
10,000 iron men and proceed dustry impart nothing fresh or 
with its star and her pictures. new. He does prove rather con- 
The deal, on such a basis, would clusively what everyone who is at 
run to $260,000 instead of $250,- all observant has known right 
000 and the conclusion which along. That is, the tail, meaning 

Loew Pfd. Off 1% on Big Board 

Net 

High Low Close Change Sales 

Columbia Pictures, vtc 26M 26U 2654 + V s 100 

Fox Film "A" 10^ 10!4 10'A 700 

Loew's, Inc 25% 25 ! A 25% — Vs 2,2W) 

Loew's, Inc.. pfd 88^ 88 r /4 88'^ —W s 100 

Paramount Publix, cts 3^ 2% 2Ji 1.400 

Pathe Exchange 1% VA VA . — Vi 2.100 

Pathe Exchange "A" 17 16'^ 17 — Y 2 700 

RKO 2 \y A 2 +y s 900 

Warner Bros 3%, 334 3M — Vt 4,100 

Technicolor Takes Eighth-Point Loss 

Net 

High Low Close Change Sales 

Technicolor \3% 13J6 13% — % 400 

Warner Bonds Advance % Point 

Net 

High Low Close Change Sales 

General Theatre Equipment 6s '40 6% 6% 6% — i/% 2 

Loew's 6s '41, ww deb rights 100 100 IOC 8 

Paramount F. L. 6s '47 44% 44% 44% + % 2 

Pathe 7s '37, ww 99K 99VJ 99^ + y 2 4 

Warner Bros. 6s '39. wd S3'A 51 l A 53% + % 16 



Hollywood, continues to wag the 
dog, meaning New York. . . . 
T 

If Winchell can spare a scal- 
lion, it ought to be handed with 
pomp and ceremony to the Screen 
Writers' Guild as well as to the 
Screen Actors' Guild. Those 
outfits, drunk on Hollywood sal- 
ary and Hollywood indifference 
to what goes on elsewhere, are 
conspiring to sell air time be- 
ginning Sept. 1 and running 18 
weeks thereafter. A neat idea. 
The writers will write and the 
actors will act. Neither will 
accept compensation, but turn 
the dough over to the guild treas- 
ury and so make sweeter the final 
days of indolent members of both 
groups. This, after nation-wide 
yells from exhibitors who gather 
in the money that keeps the Gold 
Coast immune from depressing 
times. There's a producers' as- 
sociation somewhere in Holly- 
wood that ought to go to work. . . . 
▼ 

The "You Dastard" line dis- 
played in New York newspaper 
copy for the week's run of "The 
Old-Fashioned Way" at the 
Paramount last week has some 
of the advertising boys around 
town wondering how come. After 
all. there's only one letter be- 
tween B and D. . . . Joe Brandt 
says there is only one small 
"maybe" between re-entry or no 
re-entry into the business. Popu- 
lar Pictures, Inc. — Philadelphia 
Lou B erman and New \ ork Sam 
Spring, associates — is the com- 
pany which is talking a varia- 
tion of the original First Na- 
tional franchise